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Bianca Miarka, Fábio Dal Bello, Ciro J. Brito, Fabrício B. Del Vecchio, John Amtmann and Karim Chamari

Performance analyses have been applied to investigate movements during mixed martial arts (MMA) competition and have created an accurate picture of the activity patterns that occur in the sport of MMA. 1 , 2 MMA bouts are typically decided by tactical methods with the intentional goal to

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Diego Alves dos Santos, Bianca Miarka, Fabio dal Bello, Andreia Cristiane Carrenho Queiroz, Pedro Henrique Berbert de Carvalho, Ciro José Brito and Ralph Beneke

Performance in mixed martial arts (MMA) competitions is questionably the highest assessment of physiological integration, where cardiovascular, respiratory, neuromuscular, and cognitive systems must all be articulated. 1 , 2 Indeed, preceding authors noted that much could be learned about human

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Mathew Hillier, Louise Sutton, Lewis James, Dara Mojtahedi, Nicola Keay and Karen Hind

Mixed martial arts (MMA) is a combat sport, with bouts defined by weight divisions ( Reale et al., 2017 ) with the aim of endorsing balanced and stimulating matches while reducing potential injuries that may result from substitutional differences in weight ( Mendes et al., 2013 ). For the athlete

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Oliver R. Barley, Dale W. Chapman and Chris R. Abbiss

been observed in many combat sports, such as mixed martial arts (MMA), boxing, taekwondo (TKD), karate, wrestling, judo, and kickboxing. 3 – 7 There is a large range of methods employed by combat sports athletes to lose weight, though the most common methods are body fluid manipulation and food

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Victor Silveira Coswig, Bianca Miarka, Daniel Alvarez Pires, Levy Mendes da Silva, Charles Bartel and Fabrício Boscolo Del Vecchio

Mixed martial arts (MMA) is a combat sport in which athletes aim to knockout or submit opponents through striking and grappling techniques, respectively, in both standing and ground positions ( Coswig et al., 2016a ; Kirk et al., 2015 ; Miarka et al., 2016 ). As with almost all combat sports, MMA

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Jamie Taber and Kat Longshore

As mixed martial arts (MMA) has become a more popular and technical sport ( Downey, 2007 ), it has also begun to receive more attention from sport psychologists. Elite fighters in past studies demonstrated the extreme mental stress inherent to the sport and indicated a need for improved skills to

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Andreas M. Kasper, Ben Crighton, Carl Langan-Evans, Philip Riley, Asheesh Sharma, Graeme L. Close and James P. Morton

Mixed martial arts (MMA) is a full contact combat sport often referred to as cage fighting or ultimate fighting . When compared with other combat sports ( Alderman et al., 2004 ; Davis et al., 2001 ; Kiningham & Gorenflo, 2001 ; Kordi et al., 2011 ; Morton et al., 2010 ; Oppliger et

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Carla A. Santos, Scott Tainsky, K. Alexander Schmidt and Changsup Shim

To date, scholarly attention to mixed martial arts (MMA) and the Ultimate Fighting Championship organization has been limited. This study sought to address this gap in literature by focusing on the news media’s framing of public officials’ discourse concerning MMA. In so doing, the study addressed the entanglement of news media, sport, and contemporary political maneuvering. Overall, findings suggest two dominant media frames: leveraging of sociopolitical capital to protect societal values and leveraging of sociopolitical capital to advocate for legislation. Specifically, the authors propose that news media have framed and reframed MMA as a succession of moral threats and reassurances that are given voice by public officials in the name of protecting the citizenry.

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Terry Eddy, Lamar Reams and Stephen Dittmore

As online business models have evolved, learning what drives users’ consumptive behaviors has gained increasing interest to sport researchers and sport properties. An increasing number of sport properties are expanding, and deriving revenues from, their presence on digital-media platforms (e.g., MLB, NBA, NFL, UFC, WWE, etc.). Of the sport properties mentioned, none are more reliant on digital-media activity than the Ultimate Fighting Championship. As such, the purpose of this study was to examine the motivations and related consumption habits of users of non-subscription-based (i.e., free-to-use) online message boards. Findings suggest that message-board users find value in the opportunities for interactivity and that heavy online mixed-martial-arts users watch more events and purchase more merchandise than those who spend less time online.

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Mark Mierzwinski, Philippa Velija and Dominic Malcolm

Mixed Martial Arts (MMA), like the majority of relatively violent sports, has mainly been organized around the capabilities of the male body. However various indices suggest that women’s engagement with MMA is growing. The purpose of this paper is to offer an analysis of women’s involvement in MMA using a figurational sociological approach. In doing so, we draw on interview data with “elite” female mixed martial artists to explore the extent to which females within MMA experience a specifically gendered “quest for excitement.” The paper further illustrates how the notion of “civilized bodies” can be used to interpret the distinctly gendered experiences of shame in relation to fighting in combat sports, the physical markings incurred as a consequence, and perceptions of sexual intimacy in the close physical contact of bodies. In so doing this paper provides the first figurationally-informed study of female sport involvement to focus explicitly on the role of violence in mediating social relations, while refining aspects of the figurational sociological approach to provide a more adequate framework for the analysis of gender relations.