Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 13 items for :

  • "mixed-methods analysis" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Joanna M. Kesten, Russ Jago, Simon J. Sebire, Mark J. Edwards, Laura Pool, Jesmond Zahra and Janice L. Thompson

Background:

Interventions to increase children’s physical activity (PA) have achieved limited success. This may be attributed to inaccurate parental perceptions of their children’s PA and a lack of recognition of a need to change activity levels.

Methods:

Fifty-three parents participated in semistructured interviews to determine perceptions of child PA. Perceptions were compared with children’s measured MVPA (classified as meeting or not meeting UK guidelines) to produce 3 categories: “accurate,” “over-estimate,” and “under-estimate.” Deductive content analysis was performed to understand the accuracy of parental perceptions.

Results:

All parents of children meeting the PA guidelines accurately perceived their child’s PA; while the majority of parents whose child did not meet the guidelines overestimated their PA. Most parents were unconcerned about their child’s PA level, viewing them as naturally active and willing to be active. Qualitative explanations for perceptions of insufficient activity included children having health problems and preferences for inactive pursuits, and parents having difficulty facilitating PA in poor weather and not always observing their child’s PA level. Social comparisons also influenced parental perceptions.

Conclusions:

Strategies to improve parental awareness of child PA are needed. Perceptions of child PA may be informed by child “busyness,” being unaware of activity levels, and social comparisons.

Restricted access

Jeanette M. Garcia, Alen Agaronov, John R. Sirard, Diane Whaley, David J. Rice and Arthur Weltman

Background:

Sedentary behavior (SB) increases throughout adolescence, and is associated with adverse health outcomes.

Purpose:

Examine psychosocial and friend influences on SB and screen time in adolescents using a mixed-methods design.

Methods:

108 middle and high school students wore accelerometers to measure objective SB, completed screen time and psychosocial questionnaires, and nominated friends to complete activity questionnaires. Focus groups centered around influences on SB behavior. Regression analyses and NVivo software analyzed quantitative and qualitative data.

Results:

Screen time was associated with greater screen time enjoyment, lower self-efficacy, and friends’ screen time (r 2 = .21, P < .0001). Friends influenced whether adolescents engaged in screen time behaviors, with active friends encouraging less screen time.

Conclusion:

Active friends influenced adolescents to engage in less SB. Interventions should place an emphasis on encouraging less screen time, and providing opportunities for adolescents and their friends to engage in activities that promote physical activity rather than SB.

Restricted access

James D. Wyant, Emily M. Jones and Sean M. Bulger

In recent years increased attention has been placed on physical education teachers’ use of technology. To date little research has been disseminated regarding the strategies physical education teacher education (PETE) programs are employing to prepare preservice teacher’s to use technology. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence a technology course had on advancing change in preservice teachers. A mixed methods process involving qualitative and quantitative data collection was employed. Participants included 12 preservice teachers enrolled at a mid-Atlantic university. Data analysis revealed four dominant themes emerged from participant data: (1) Increased Technological and Technological Pedagogical Knowledge; (2) Persistent First- and Second-Order Barriers to Technology Use; (3) Necessity of Experiential and Hands-on Learning; and (4) Variation in Warrant for Technology Use. Findings illustrate strengths and limitations of a technology course in a preservice PETE program as well as its potential benefits and impediments to manifesting teacher change.

Restricted access

Mika R. Moran, Perla Werner, Israel Doron, Neta HaGani, Yael Benvenisti, Abby C. King, Sandra J. Winter, Jylana L. Sheats, Randi Garber, Hadas Motro and Shlomit Ergon

Walking is a central form of physical activity among older adults that is associated with the physical environment at various scales. This mixed-methods study employs a concurrent nested design to explore objective and perceived environmental characteristics of older adults’ local walking routes. This was achieved by integrating quantitative Geographic Information System (GIS) data with qualitative data obtained using the Stanford Discovery Tool (DT). Fifty-nine community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults (14 men and 45 women aged 50+) were recruited in a snowball approach through community centers in the city of Haifa (Israel). Four neighborhood environment themes were identified: pedestrian infrastructure, access to destinations, aesthetics, and environmental quality. Both geometrical traits (i.e., distance, slope) and urban features (i.e., land-uses, greenery) of the route may impact the experience of walking. The findings thus highlight the importance of micro-scale environmental elements in shaping environmental perceptions, which may consequently influence the choice of being active.

Restricted access

Thomas Horky, Marianna Baranovskaa, Christoph G. Grimmer, Honorata Jakubowska and Barbara Stelzner

Football’s (soccer’s) EURO 2016 in France marked a high point for sport journalism and broadcasting. Due to the implementation of a uniform multilateral image feed by the European Football Association (UEFA), differences in the verbal live commentary became significant. This study investigated commentary of the live television broadcasts of 4 matches in a specific country. Using social identity and self-categorization, a mixed-methods analysis was employed to quantitatively analyze the commentary and qualitatively assess content for notions of nationalism, patriotism, or globalization. Instead of notions of ideological nationalism, coverage emphasized sporting action and Europeanization of the event. Excluding forms of “banal nationalism” like introducing the teams and playing national anthems, live commentary presented fair or positive patriotism, together with remarks of transnational friendship and comradeship of the players. Based on the increasing frequency of sport organizations using similar image feeds in the future, a decreasing relevance for live commentary by national broadcasters is discussed.

Restricted access

Nicole Alfonsin, Vienna McLeod, Angela Loder and Loretta DiPietro

(Baltim) . 2015 ; 70 : 50 – 58 . PubMed ID: 25448843 doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.11.011 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.11.011 18. Hipp JA , Dodson EA , Lee JA , et al . Mixed methods analysis of eighteen worksite policies, programs, and environments for physical activity . Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act

Restricted access

Tyler Prochnow, Haley Delgado, Megan S. Patterson and M. Renée Umstattd Meyer

sedentary behavior and screen time: a mixed methods analysis . J Phys Act Health . 2017 ; 14 ( 3 ): 213 – 221 . PubMed ID: 27918697 doi: 10.1123/jpah.2016-0035 30. Garcia JM , Sirard JR , Deutsch NL , Weltman A . The influence of friends and psychosocial factors on physical activity and

Restricted access

Denny Meyer, Madawa W. Jayawar, Samuel Muir, David Ho and Olivia Sackett

has shown that a mixed-methods analysis is well suited to an evaluation of programs such as the VPGC, with qualitative data used to add richness and context for the quantitative results. The use of text mining for the extraction of qualitative information is recommended because this information can

Restricted access

Sheena S. Philip, Joy C. Macdermid, Saranya Nair, Dave Walton and Ruby Grewal

. This mixed method analysis will capture the risk factors for DRF from multiple dimensions, including patient perception. Objective To describe the factors that lead to a DRF, considering age, gender, mechanism of fracture, work status, and patient perception. Methods Ethics The study was reviewed and

Restricted access

Travis R. Bell and Karen L. Hartman

study: RQ1 : How did media coverage of Maria Sharapova’s drug suspension change linguistically in the week following her admitted drug suspension? RQ2 : How did media frame Maria Sharapova’s press conference in the week following her admitted drug suspension? Method This research is a mixed-methods