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Jennifer Ostrowski, C. Collin Herb, James Scifers, Teraka Gonzalez, Amada Jennings and Danvirg Breton

heating modality has been introduced, the ThermoStim Probe (TSP; Dynatronics Corporation, Cottonwood Heights, UT). The TSP combines heat or cold with electrical stimulation, with a head designed for soft tissue mobilization (Figure  1A ); the recommendation is these 3 treatments be delivered

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Amy Warren, Erin J. Howden, Andrew D. Williams, James W. Fell and Nathan A. Johnson

Postexercise fat oxidation may be important for exercise prescription aimed at optimizing fat loss. The authors examined the effects of exercise intensity, duration, and modality on postexercise oxygen consumption (VO2) and substrate selection/respiratory-exchange ratio (RER) in healthy individuals. Three experiments (n = 7 for each) compared (a) short- (SD) vs. long-duration (LD) ergometer cycling exercise (30 min vs. 90 min) matched for intensity, (b) low- (LI) vs. high-intensity (HI) cycling (50% vs. 85% of VO2max) matched for energy expenditure, and (c) continuous (CON) vs. interval (INT) cycling matched for energy expenditure and mean intensity. All experiments were administered by crossover design. Altering exercise duration did not affect postexercise VO2 or RER kinetics (p > .05). However, RER was lower and fat oxidation was higher during the postexercise period in LD vs. SD (p < .05). HI vs. LI resulted in a significant increase in total postexercise energy expenditure and fat oxidation (p < .01). Altering exercise modality (CON vs. INT) did not affect postexercise VO2, RER, or fat oxidation (p > .05). These results demonstrate that postexercise energy expenditure and fat oxidation can be augmented by increasing exercise intensity, but these benefits cannot be exploited by undertaking interval exercise (1:2-min work:recovery ratio) when total energy expenditure, duration, and mean intensity remain unchanged. In spite of the apparent benefit of these strategies, the amount of fat oxidized after exercise may be inconsequential compared with that oxidized during the exercise bout.

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Dave Smith and Paul Holmes

This study examined the effect of various imagery modalities on golf putting performance. Forty experienced male golfers were randomly assigned to one of four groups. A “written script” group received a personalized, response proposition-laden script. Participants in the audio and video groups either listened to an audiotape or watched an internal-perspective videotape of themselves putting. Control participants spent an equivalent amount of time reading golf literature. Each participant completed a 15-ball putting task twice a week for 6 weeks and also performed his imagery or reading daily during this period. Pretests revealed no significant differences in performance. Posttests, however, showed that the video and audio groups performed significantly better than the written script and control groups. This indicates that the form in which an imagery intervention is delivered can have a significant impact on its performance effectiveness.

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Tannus Quatre

Column-editor : Robert D. Kersey

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Josely C. Koury, Astrogildo V. de Oliveira Jr., Emílson S. Portella, Cyntia F. de Oliveira, Gustavo C. Lopes and Carmen M. Donangelo

The purpose of this study was lo compare zinc and copper biochemical indices of antioxidant status and their relationship in elite athletes of different modalities: aerobic with high-impact (triathletes, n = 10 and long-distance runners, n = 12), anaerobic with high-impact (short-distance runners, n = 9), and anaerobic with low-impact (short-distance swimmers, n = 13). The influence of recent dietary intake and body composition was also evaluated. A venous blood sample was drawn 16-20 hr after competition for the following measurements: packed-cell volume and hemoglobin in blood; copper and zinc in plasma and erythrocytes; ceruloplasmin in plasma; superoxide dismutase activity and metal-lothionein in erythrocyles; and erythrocyte osmotic fragility. Zinc and copper intakes were not different in the athlete groups and did not affect the biochemical indices measured. Athletes of the long-distance high-impact aerobic modalities had higher indices of antioxidant protection (erythrocyte zinc, superoxide dismutase activity, and metallothionein) than those of the short-distance low-impact modalities, suggesting that there is adaptation of the antioxidant capacity to the specific training. Significant correlations were observed in all athletes between erythrocyte zinc, superoxide dismutase activity, and metallothionein consistent with the importance of an adequate zinc status in the response of antioxidant mechanisms to intense exercise.

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Liza Stathokostas and Gareth R. Jones

A convenience sample of 176 healthy, community-dwelling, inactive older adults (mean age 70 ± 5 years; 62 males, 114 females) were tracked for one year. The purpose was to describe the exercise modality choices older adults make one year following participation in an exercise and education intervention. Telephone follow-up contacted 137 participants (78%, men = 50, women = 87) and 62% of the men and 69% of the women reported to be “currently exercising.” Exercising independently was the most common type of exercise reported by 81% and 64% of men and women, respectively. Walking was the most commonly reported modality by both genders. The setting of exercise was most often reported to be at home or outside for both men and women. The main reason for continued participation at 12 months was for overall health (50% of men and 40% of women). Little variation was observed for exercise modality choice. Future interventions should consider a variety of exercise and physical activity opportunities for older adults.

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Jeremy R. Hawkins and Shawn W. Hawkins

Cryotherapy is commonly used by athletic trainers, although evidence is inconsistent to support its usage. Data are also lacking as to how athletic trainers treat common injuries with cryotherapy. The purpose of this study was to ascertain how collegiate athletic trainers approach the use of cryotherapy and whether that usage reflects what little we know about the modalities. Survey results indicated great variability in respondents’ approaches to the treatment of an acute and subacute ankle sprain. Additional data are needed to create clear treatment guidelines with respect to cryotherapy. Certain aspects of the application of cryotherapy should be reviewed and use adjusted accordingly.

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Matthew Hanson and James Day

Context:

Therapeutic modalities are routinely administered to increase fexibility, but the relative effects of different modes of tissue heating on passive range of motion (PROM) are unknown.

Objective:

To assess the relative effects of active exercise on a stationary bicycle, moist hot pack treatment, and warm whirlpool treatment on hip fexion PROM.

Design:

Repeated measures.

Subjects:

24 males and 20 females between the ages 18 and 24 years.

Main Outcome Measure

Hip fexion PROM measured by an inclinometer.

Results:

Repeated measures analysis of variance identified a significant difference among the heating methods, F(1, 43) = 32.41; p < .001. Active exercise produced the greatest change in hip fexion PROM.

Conclusions:

All three treatment methods produced an increase in hip fexion PROM, but active exercise produced a significantly greater increase than moist hot pack and warm whirlpool treatments.

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Geraldine L. Pellecchia, Holly Hamel and Peter Behnke

The purpose of this study was to compare an established protocol of modalities and transverse friction massage (MOD & TFM) with iontophoresis of dexamethasone and lidocaine (IONTO) in the treatment of patients with infrapatellar tendinitis. Thirty cases with infrapatellar tendinitis were randomly assigned to either the MOD & TFM or the IONTO intervention. Subjects still symptomatic after six sessions of intervention received the alternate treatment protocol. Four measures were used to assess patient status: a functional index questionnaire, a visual analog pain scale, a rating of tenderness with palpation of the involved tendon, and the number of step-ups needed to elicit pain. In response to the MOD & TFM intervention, only the number of step-ups performed to elicit pain showed significant improvement. All status measures improved significantly with the IONTO intervention. The results suggest that iontophoresis may be more effective and efficient in decreasing pain, reducing inflammation, and promoting healing in patients with infrapatellar tendinitis.

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Marc Sim, Brian Dawson, Grant Landers, Dorine W. Swinkels, Harold Tjalsma, Debbie Trinder and Peter Peeling

The effect of exercise modality and intensity on Interleukin-6 (IL-6), iron status, and hepcidin levels was investigated. Ten trained male triathletes performed 4 exercise trials including low-intensity continuous running (L-R), low-intensity continuous cycling (L-C), high-intensity interval running (H-R), and high-intensity interval cycling (H-C). Both L-R and L-C consisted of 40 min continuous exercise performed at 65% of peak running velocity (vVO2peak) and cycling power output (pVO2peak), while H-R and H-C consisted of 8 × 3-min intervals performed at 85% vVO2peak and pVO2peak. Venous blood samples were drawn pre-, post-, and 3 hr postexercise. Significant increases in postexercise IL-6 were seen within each trial (p < .05) and were significantly greater in H-R than L-R (p < .05). Hepcidin levels were significantly elevated at 3 hr postexercise within each trial (p < .05). Serum iron levels were significantly elevated (p < .05) immediately postexercise in all trials except L-C. These results suggest that, regardless of exercise mode or intensity, postexercise increases in IL-6 may be expected, likely influencing a subsequent elevation in hepcidin. Regardless, the lack of change in postexercise serum iron levels in L-C may indicate that reduced hemolysis occurs during weight-supported, low-intensity activity.