Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 630 items for :

  • "motor skills" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Megan MacDonald, Catherine Lord and Dale A. Ulrich

In addition to the core characteristics of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), motor skill deficits are present, persistent, and pervasive across age. Although motor skill deficits have been indicated in young children with autism, they have not been included in the primary discussion of early intervention content. One hundred fifty-nine young children with a confirmed diagnosis of ASD (n = 110), PDD-NOS (n = 26), and non-ASD (n = 23) between the ages of 14–33 months participated in this study.1 The univariate general linear model tested the relationship of fine and gross motor skills and social communicative skills (using calibrated autism severity scores). Fine motor and gross motor skills significantly predicted calibrated autism severity (p < .05). Children with weaker motor skills have greater social communicative skill deficits. Future directions and the role of motor skills in early intervention are discussed.

Restricted access

You Fu and Ryan D. Burns

, 2007 ). Because children spend a significant portion of waking hours during school, finding ways to increase school day physical activity may facilitate meeting daily guidelines. Improving gross motor skills may facilitate meeting daily physical activity guidelines in youth. Evidence suggests that the

Restricted access

Jacqueline D. Goodway, Heather Crowe and Phillip Ward

The influence of a 9-week instructional program on locomotor and object control skill development of preschoolers who are at risk of developmental delay was investigated. The motor skill instruction group (n = 33) received 18, 35-min lessons; the comparison group (n = 30) received the regular prekindergarten program. Pre and posttest scores on the locomotor and object control subscales of the Test of Gross Motor Development (Ulrich, 1985) were obtained. A Group by Gender MANOVA with repeated measures yielded a significant Group by Time interaction. The intervention group performed significantly better than the comparison group from pre to posttest for both locomotor and object control skills. Additionally, this group had significantly higher posttest scores than the comparison group.

Restricted access

Ruri Famelia, Emi Tsuda, Syahrial Bakhtiar and Jacqueline D. Goodway

proposed by Stodden et al. ( 2008 ). This model suggests that fundamental motor skill (FMS) competence may be a key underlying mechanism driving physical activity behaviors over time. Moreover, perceived motor competence, and health-related fitness may mediate this relationship ( Robinson et al., 2015

Restricted access

Laura Spivey Kabiri, Katy Mitchell, Wayne Brewer and Alexis Ortiz

Almost 2 million American children are homeschooled but no information is currently available regarding motor skill proficiency within this population. The purpose of this research was to describe motor skill proficiency among homeschooled children and assess differences in homeschooled subgroups. This crosssectional study screened 73 homeschooled children aged 5–8 years for overall motor skill proficiency using the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, Second Edition, Short Form (BOT-2 SF). Independent t tests examined differences in motor skill proficiency within the homeschooled population. Mann-Whitney U tests examined differences in motor skill proficiency classification within significantly different subgroups. Homeschooled children demonstrated average motor proficiency. Significantly different motor proficiency was seen among homeschooled children participating in 3 or more hours of organized sports per week, t(71) = 2.805, p = .006, 95% CI = 1.77, 10.49, and whose primary caregiver was employed versus unemployed, t(71) = –3.875, p < .001, 95% CI = –13.29, –4.26. Mann-Whitney U tests revealed significantly different motor skill proficiency classification in these same subgroups. Overall, homeschooling showed no detrimental effect on motor skill proficiency. Participation in 3 or more hours of organized sports per week or having an unemployed primary caregiver may improve motor skill proficiency among this population.

Restricted access

David I. Anderson

“Motor Development as Foundation and Future for Developmental Psychology” ( Thelen, 2000a ). That agenda included 6 themes: multimodal perception and action, formal models and robotics, embodied cognition, neural bases of motor skill development, learning and plasticity, and cultural and individual

Restricted access

Edward Hebert

The use of demonstrations, or modeling, is among the most commonly used instructional strategies, and the idea that one could learn a motor skill by watching another perform it has intrigued scholars for decades (for recent reviews, see Ong & Hodges, 2012 ; Rosen, Salas, Pavlas, Jensen, Fu

Restricted access

Ryan D. Burns, Youngwon Kim, Wonwoo Byun and Timothy A. Brusseau

Fundamental gross motor skills facilitate physical health, well-being, and performance in activities of daily living for the developing child. 1 , 2 Fundamental gross motor skills manifest from rudimentary phases of infancy to complicated locomotor and manipulative movements and serve as building

Restricted access

Victor E.D. Pinheiro and Herbert A. Simon

The ability to diagnose motor skills is one of the most important competences of a teacher of physical education and sport. Teacher education programs fall short of providing prospective teachers with courses in motor skill diagnosis. To be successful, any effort to teach it must rest on a sound conceptual framework or model. This article provides the theoretical framework for adapting information-processing theory, a widely accepted theory of human thinking, to modeling diagnostic thought processes. It describes specifically the three components of the model: acquisition, cue interpretation, and diagnostic decision. The findings from the model provide a foundation upon which to build instructional strategies for developing diagnostic competence.

Restricted access

Amanda Timler, Fleur McIntyre and Beth Hands

. Boldface indicates gender difference ( p  < .001). Discussion The PCA of the AMCQ scores identified four factors that contributed to Australian adolescent self-report of their motor skill competence. These were related to Participation in Physical Activities and Sports, Activities of Daily Living, Public