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Fábio Saraiva Flôres, Luis Paulo Rodrigues, and Rita Cordovil

Motor Behavior of Schoolchildren (AMBS), which assesses the quality and quantity of the physical affordances in the 6- to 10-year-old children microsystems. Specifically, we intend to validate the AMBS as a reliable tool to analyze the home (and its materials) and school environments, with the purpose

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A. Mark Williams and Bradley Fawver

developments in the field of motor behavior research over the last 10–15 years. Our intention is to highlight some of the most significant and impactful empirical work conducted in the field and to highlight novel and emerging areas for future research. The task of identifying areas of study that have been the

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Laura Žlibinaitė, Rima Solianik, Daiva Vizbaraitė, Dalia Mickevičienė, and Albertas Skurvydas

cognitive and motor behavior in overweight and obese women. Methods Participants Thirty-six subjects were assessed for eligibility to participate in this study. The inclusion criteria were as follows: women (1) with a body mass index (BMI) greater than 25 kg/m 2 , (2) exhibiting weight stability (body

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Nathálya Gardênia de Holanda Marinho Nogueira, Bárbara de Paula Ferreira, Fernanda Veruska Narciso, Juliana Otoni Parma, Sara Edith Souza de Assis Leão, Guilherme Menezes Lage, and Lidiane Aparecida Fernandes

-types have better athletic performance in the morning, measured by race times, than N- and E-types. The Grooved Pegboard Test is a suitable task for investigating the relationship between chronotypes and cognitive/motor behavior because it has both motor and cognitive demands ( Bryden & Roy, 1999 ; Bryden

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Greg Reid

Four types of motor behavior research that include special populations are described. These research areas are descriptive, program effectiveness, theory generalization, and theory construction. In addition, three levels of applied and basic research outlined by Christina (in press) are described and juxtaposed to the four types of motor behavior research. Current trends and potential areas of inquiry are highlighted in each. In particular, Christina’s Level 2 applied research is considered attractive for adapted physical activity researchers, as it is theory-driven with relevant tasks and fiinctional settings and may therefore contribute to a growing professional literature.

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Sara M. Scharoun, David A. Gonzalez, Eric A. Roy, and Pamela J. Bryden

feedback in the development of reaching . Journal of Motor Behavior, 11 ( 3 ), 189 – 200 . PubMed doi:10.1080/00222895.1979.10735187 10.1080/00222895.1979.10735187 Heath , M. , Westwood , D.A. , Roy , E.A. , & Young , R.P. ( 2002 ). Manual asymmetries in tool-use: Implications for apraxia

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Emmanuel Jacobs, Ann Hallemans, Jan Gielen, Luc Van den Dries, Annouk Van Moorsel, Jonas Rutgeerts, and Nathalie A. Roussel

only seven workshops on the motor behavior of novice performers. The workshops focused on using the body’s qualities (such as gait pattern) creating a specific image. Specific imaginary techniques have proven their efficiency concerning motor control adaptations when they are used to change the moving

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Richard C. Noel

The effect of visuo-motor behavioral rehearsal (VMBR) training on tennis service performance during a tournament was investigated with 14 male tennis players. Seven participants were trained in relaxation I0 days before a major tournament, and then given a. relaxation and visualization audiocassette tape to use on a daily basis prior to the tournament. The visualization part of the tape led them to imagine themselves performing in their first tournament match, and guided them in repetitive practice on their serves. Seven other participants also competed in the tournament but did not receive the VMBR training. The higher ability training group achieved a marginally significant improvement in their percentage of good first serves, while the lower ability training group declined in their accuracy. Overall performance, as measured by their ratio of winners to errors, also favored the higher ability training group. Possible explanations of the results are discussed in terms of the interaction between the training program and the type of performer.

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Greg Reid

Physical activity participation of persons with disabilities might be enhanced by careful application of motor behavior research to instructional settings. However, it is argued that this research is not easily stated in terms that are useful to practitioners. The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between theoretical research and practice, and to suggest research strategies that will translate findings into helpful information for instruction. A number of applied research strategies are proposed, intended to gradually move from laboratory-inspired problems to issues applicable in typical instructional settings. These strategies include a clear conceptual rationale for including people with disabilities in the research, task modifications, a powerful initial study, replications, investigating interactions, conducting comparative studies, modifying the unit of analysis, generalization, and instructional considerations.

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Jerry R. Thomas, Karen E. French, and Charlotte A. Humphries

In this paper we propose that research in motor behavior has failed to meet the obligation of studying how children learn important sport skills. In particular, understanding the specific sport knowledge base is essential to studying skilled sport behavior. To support this view we review the research in the cognitive area relative to the development of expertise. We then attempt to justify why a similar approach is useful for motor behavior researchers and why they should undertake the study of sport skill acquisition. Finally, we offer a paradigm within which sport skill research might take place.