Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 58 items for :

  • "multiple case study" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Laura Martin and Martin Camiré

instance, the Bean et al. ( 2018 ) continuum was used to conceptualize the study, structure data collection activities, and drive the deductive analysis. Furthermore, the study made use of a multiple case study design to examine patterns of corroboration through the triangulation of sources (i

Restricted access

Motohide Miyahara and Alena Wafer

The teaching process and outcome in a skill theme program and a movement concepts program were described and analyzed in seven children with developmental coordination disorder. It was hypothesized that the skill theme program would improve targeted skills and perceived physical competence, whereas the movement concepts program would improve self-esteem and creativity. The seven children were taught individually by the same student teachers twice a week for a period of five weeks in one of the teaching methods. After a vacation, the teachers changed their teaching strategies and taught the same children using the alternative method. Although the hypothesis was generally supported, the children’s response to and progress in the programs varied. Possible factors influencing the variation were discussed.

Restricted access

Hayley Morrison and Doug Gleddie

effective growth and learning. Research Design Methodology A multiple case study design of three schools (three distinct cases) was used to gather rich, detailed descriptions ( Merriam & Tisdell, 2016 ) of practitioners’ experiences. Stake (2005) describes that using multiple case studies allows the

Restricted access

James E. Johnson, Chrysostomos Giannoulakis, and Beau F. Scott

competitive balance decisions? Method Multiple Case Study Approach This study employed a multiple case study approach ( Yin, 2003 ) as part of a dual-method qualitative methodology that included semistructured in-depth interviews and secondary archival source material. Each interscholastic state athletic

Restricted access

Shaunna M. Burke, Jennifer Brunet, Amanda Wurz, Christina Butler, and Andrea Utley

recreational cycling over a 3-month period as a result of receiving a bicycle from Cyclist Fighting Cancer. Methods The present study was guided by a multiple case study approach ( Stake, 2005 ), which enabled an in-depth understanding of the complex and multidimensional processes underpinning childhood cancer

Restricted access

Wade D. Gilbert and Pierre Trudel

The present study examined how model youth sport coaches learn to coach through experience. Yin’s multiple-case study approach was used with six youth team sport coaches. Data were collected over an entire sport season through a series of semi-structured interviews, observations, and documents. All six case study coaches developed and refined coaching strategies through a process of reflection. Six components characterized reflection: coaching issues, role frame, issue setting, strategy generation, experimentation, and evaluation. A reflective conversation comprising the latter four components, triggered by coaching issues and bound by the coach’s role frame, was central to reflection. The selection of options at each stage in a reflective conversation was influenced by access to peers, a coach’s stage of learning, issue characteristics, and the environment. Furthermore, three types of reflection were evident: reflection-in-action, reflection-on-action, and retrospective reflection-on-action.

Restricted access

Wade D. Gilbert, Pierre Trudel, and Leon P. Haughian

This study provided a descriptive analysis of the interactive decision making factors considered by coaches of youth ice hockey (aged 10–15 years) during games. Using a multiple–case study design, data were collected using a combination of semistructured interviews and an adapted version of stimulated recall interviews. An inductive analysis of the interview transcripts revealed 5 types of interactive decisions, 5 types of goals, and 21 types of factors. The factors were regrouped into two categories (Field Information and Coach Knowledge) and four subcategories (Objective Information, Subjective Information, Player Characteristics, and Knowledge of the Game). Although individual coach differences were found, important cross-coach similarities also emerged. On average, between 2.6 and 3.2 factors were cited for each interactive decision. The adoption of dichotic (yes-no) decision making models based exclusively on player performance, and the ecological validity of conducting lab-based studies to examine the interactive decision making of coaches, is challenged.

Restricted access

Chris Button, Stuart Moyle, and Keith Davids

There has been no direct attempt to evaluate whether gait performed overground and on a treadmill is the same for lower limb amputees. A multiple case study approach was adopted to explore the degenerate movement behavior displayed by three male amputees. Participants walked overground at a self-selected preferred pace and when this speed was enforced on a treadmill (50 stride cycles per condition). The extremities of motion (i.e., maximum flexion) for the hip and knee joints differed between conditions (0.2–3.8°). For two participants, the temporal asymmetry of gait was reduced on the treadmill. Initial data suggest that research on amputees simulating overground walking on a treadmill might need to be interpreted with some caution.

Restricted access

Dina Bell-Laroche, Joanne MacLean, Lucie Thibault, and Richard Wolfe

This study examined sport leaders’ perceptions of the use of stated values in the management and performance of their organization. Qualitative data were collected from nine Canadian national sport organizations (NSOs) in a multiple-case studies design, involving analysis of interview transcripts. Results indicated that while many of the NSOs operated from a traditional management by objectives approach, they perceived management by values (MBV) as being important and contributing to enhanced organizational performance. Leaders indicated that more efforts to engage staff members in developing core organizational values and to strategically use values in day-to-day management practice were required. A 4-I Framework describing how an NSO can progress through different stages of strategically using values in management practice was developed. NSO leaders also voiced an interest in embedding organizational values into NSO strategic and other planning processes.

Restricted access

Wade D. Gilbert and Pierre Trudel

Similar to a belief system, a role frame acts as a perceptual filter that influences how practitioners define their professional responsibilities (Schön, 1983). The purpose of this article is to present the role frame components of model youth team sport coaches. The results are based on a two-year multiple-case study with six coaches. On average, the coaches’ role frame comprised two boundary components and nine internal components. Boundary components are objective environmental conditions that can influence an individual’s approach to coaching. Internal role frame components are personal views a coach holds regarding youth sport coaching. A discussion of how role frames can be examined and used by researchers, coaches, and coach educators is provided.