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Josef Mitáš, Ding Ding, Karel Frömel and Jacqueline Kerr

Background:

Post-communist countries have experienced rapid economic development and social changes, which have been accompanied by changes in health-related lifestyle behaviors, such as physical activity. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations of domain-specific physical activity and total sedentary time with BMI among adults in the Czech Republic.

Methods:

We surveyed a nationally representative sample (n = 4097) of the Czech Republic in fall 2007 using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (long form). Multiple linear regression analyses were used to examine associations of physical activity, sedentary time and sociodemograhic characteristics with BMI.

Results:

Older age, lower educational attainment, and lower levels of leisure-time physical activity were associated with higher BMI. Compared with those living in large cities, men living in small towns and women living in small villages had higher BMI.

Conclusions:

This study has identified correlates of BMI in the Czech Republic. Although more evidence from longitudinal studies is needed, findings from the current study can inform interventions to prevent the rising obesity epidemic.

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Mette Toftager, Ola Ekholm, Jasper Schipperijn, Ulrika Stigsdotter, Peter Bentsen, Morten Grønbæk, Thomas B. Randrup and Finn Kamper-Jørgensen

Background:

This study examines the relationship between distance to green space and the level of physical activity among the population of Denmark. In addition, the relationship between distance to green space and obesity is investigated.

Methods:

Data derived from the Danish National Health Interview Survey 2005, a cross-sectional survey based on a region-stratified random nationally representative sample of 21,832 Danish adults. All data are self-reported.

Results:

Respondents living more than 1 km from green space had lower odds of using green space to exercise and keep in shape compared with persons living closer than 300 m to green space (OR: 0.71; 95% CI: 0.60−0.83). A relationship between moderate/vigorous physical activity during leisure time and distance to green space can also be found. Persons living more than 1 km from green space had higher odds of being obese (BMI ≥ 30) than those living less than 300 m from green space (OR: 1.36; 95% CI: 1.08−1.71).

Conclusions:

Self-reported distance to green space is related to self-reported physical activity and obesity. To exercise and keep in shape is an important reason for visiting green space, and distance to green space is associated with moderate/vigorous physical activity in leisure time.

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Suresh Joshi, Santosh Jatrana and Yin Paradies

Background:

We investigated the differences and over time changes in recommended physical activity among foreign-born (FB) from English speaking countries (ESC) and non-English speaking countries (NESC) relative to native-born (NB) Australians, and whether the association between nativity and duration of residence (DoR) and physical activity is mediated by English language proficiency, socioeconomic status and social engagement/membership.

Methods:

This study applies multilevel group-meancentered mixed (hybrid) logistic regression models to 12 waves of longitudinal data (12,634 individuals) from the Household, Income and Labor Dynamics in Australia survey with engagement in physical activities for more than 3 times a week as the outcome variable.

Results:

Immigrants from ESC had higher odds of physical activity, while immigrants from NESC had significantly lower odds of physical activity than NB Australians, after adjusting for covariates. There was no evidence that these differences changed by DoR among immigrants from NESC, whereas ESC immigrants had higher odds of physical activity when their DoR was more than 20 years. We also found a mediating role of English language proficiency on immigrants physical activities.

Conclusion:

Appropriate health promotion interventions should be implemented to foster physical activities among NESC immigrants, considering English language proficiency as an important factor in designing interventions.

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Sharon E. Taverno Ross, Lori A. Francis, Rhonda Z. BeLue and Edna A. Viruell-Fuentes

Background:

This study examines relations between parent and youth physical activity (PA; days per week), sports participation, and overweight (BMI ≥ 85th percentile) among U.S. youth, and whether this relationship varies by immigrant generation and sex.

Methods:

Participants included 28,691 youth ages 10–17 years from the 2007 National Survey of Children’s Health. Youth were grouped into first, second, and third or higher generation. Primary analyses include Chi-square and post hoc tests to assess mean differences, and adjusted logistic regressions to test associations between weight status and independent variables.

Results:

Each additional day youth participated in PA decreased their odds of overweight (OW) by 10% [OR: 0.90 (0.87–0.94)]; participation in sports significantly reduced their odds of OW by 17% [OR: 0.83 (0.71–0.98)]. First generation boys who participated in sports had 70% lower odds of OW [OR: 0.30 (0.11–0.83)] compared with first generation boys who did not participate in sports. For third generation girls, participation in sports reduced the odds of OW by 23% [OR: 0.77 (0.62–0.96)] compared with those who did not participate in sports.

Conclusion:

The protective influence of PA on youth’s risk of OW varies by immigrant generation and sex. Parent PA was not related to youth’s risk of OW.

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Hayley Guiney, Michael Keall and Liana Machado

older adults’ physical activity is limited, with only a handful of studies examining relevant correlates. In one study, which used physical activity data from a 2003 nationally-representative survey with people aged 60 years and over, 18% met the physically inactive criterion (defined as engaging in no

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Patrick Abi Nader, Lina Majed, Susan Sayegh, Lama Mattar, Ruba Hadla, Marie Claire Chamieh, Carla Habib Mourad, Elie-Jacques Fares, Zeina Hawa and Mathieu Bélanger

nationally representative study that evaluated the weight status of Lebanese youth. 10 In this most recent study, authors found that 34.8% and 13.2% of Lebanese youth were overweight and obese, respectively. 10 Furthermore, both studies reported participation in PA using 3 weekly frequency cutoffs (did not

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Theresa E. Gildner, J. Josh Snodgrass, Clare Evans and Paul Kowal

Health Organization (WHO) study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) Wave 1 ( Kowal et al., 2012 ). Nationally representative data were drawn from six LMICs (China, Ghana, India, Mexico, the Russian Federation, and South Africa) to examine these relations in several distinct populations, a unique

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Rachel Allison

, nationally representative dataset to assess the extent to which race shapes sportswomen’s perceived life skill development in college. My analysis brings intersectionality and critical race theories into the Student-Athlete Climate Study (SACS) conceptual model of college athletes’ academic experiences

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Adam Karg, Heath McDonald and Civilai Leckie

reason for support. As expected, given the diverse behaviors of this nationally representative sample, the number of STH differed across groups. The AFL has over 900,000 STHs ( Guthrie, 2017 ), translating to more than one in every 28 Australians being a STH of their supported team. This initial analysis

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Meghan Edwards and Paul Loprinzi

representative sample of US adults. Such a study, to the authors’ knowledge, has yet to be conducted. Examining this dose–response association within a nationally representative sample will increase the evidence supporting a biological link between the physical activity and the AIP and will maximize the