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Paul D. Loprinzi and Jerome F. Walker

Objective:

To our knowledge, no longitudinal epidemiological study among daily smokers has examined the effects of physical activity change/trajectory on smoking cessation. The purpose of this study was to examine the longitudinal effects of changes in physical activity on smoking cessation among a national sample of young (16–24 y) daily smokers.

Methods:

Data from the 2003–2005 National Youth Smoking Cessation Survey were used (N = 1178). Using hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis, 5 distinct self-reported physical activity trajectories over 3 time periods (baseline, 12-month, and 24-month follow-up) were observed, including stable low physical activity, decreasing physical activity, curvilinear physical activity, stable high physical activity, and increasing physical activity. Nicotine dependence (Heaviness of Smoking Index) and demographic parameters were assessed via survey.

Results:

With stable low physical activity (16.2% quit smoking) serving as the referent group, those in the stable high physical activity (24.8% quit smoking) group had 1.8 greater odds of not smoking at the 24-month follow-up period (odds ratio = 1.81; 95% confidence interval, 1.12–2.91) after adjusting for nicotine dependence, age, gender, race-ethnicity, and education.

Conclusions:

Maintenance of regular physical activity among young daily smokers may help to facilitate smoking cessation.

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Kellie A. Langlois, Nicholas Birkett, Rochelle Garner and Jennifer O’Loughlin

Background:

Despite the benefits of physical activity, many Canadian adolescents are inactive and rates of inactivity increase with age. Few studies describe the pattern of change in physical activity as a function of age during adolescence.

Methods:

Data were drawn from the Nicotine Dependence in Teens Study. The analytic sample included 1206 adolescents who completed a 7-day physical activity recall up to 4 times per year over 5 years. Individual growth models, analyzed using multilevel models for change, were developed separately by sex controlling for season.

Results:

Physical activity levels through adolescence were best described by a cubic function. Levels increased from age 12 to a peak at approximately age 13.5, decreased to age 16.5, and increased again to age 17. Activity participation was highest in the spring and lowest during fall and winter. Substantial within- and between-subject heterogeneity in the trajectories was evident.

Conclusion:

Adolescent physical activity follows a complex, curvilinear pattern in both males and females, with considerable variation within- and between-persons.

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Lisa Kakinami, Erin K. O’Loughlin, Erika N. Dugas, Catherine M. Sabiston, Gilles Paradis and Jennifer O’Loughlin

Background:

Compared with traditional nonactive video games, exergaming contributes significantly to overall daily physical activity (PA) in experimental studies, but the association in observational studies is not clear.

Methods:

Data were available in the 2011 to 2012 wave of the Nicotine Dependence in Teens (NDIT) study (N = 829). Multivariable sex-stratified models assessed the association between exergaming (1–3 times per month in the past year) and minutes of moderate and vigorous physical activity in the previous week, and the association between exergaming and meeting PA recommendations.

Results:

Compared with male exergamers, female exergamers were more likely to believe exergames were a good way to integrate PA into their lives (89% vs 62%, P = .0001). After we adjusted for covariates, male exergamers were not significantly different from male nonexergamers in minutes of PA. Female exergamers reported 47 more minutes of moderate PA in the previous week compared with female nonexergamers (P = .03). There was no association between exergaming and meeting PA recommendations.

Conclusion:

Exergaming contributes to moderate minutes of PA among women but not among men. Differences in attitudes toward exergaming should be further explored.

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Diego Munguia-Izquierdo, Carmen Mayolas-Pi, Carlos Peñarrubia-Lozano, Federico Paris-Garcia, Javier Bueno-Antequera, Miguel Angel Oviedo-Caro and Alejandro Legaz-Arrese

the Mediterranean diet. Consumption of and dependence on tobacco were evaluated by the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence revised, 27 which has shown good psychometric properties. Alcohol consumption per week was assessed by the sum of products, which was calculated by multiplying the frequency

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Mohammad Siahpush, Trish D. Levan, Minh N. Nguyen, Brandon L. Grimm, Athena K. Ramos, Tzeyu L. Michaud and Patrik L. Johansson

. Socioeconomic variations in nicotine dependence, self-efficacy and intention to quit across four countries: findings from the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Survey . Tobacco Control . 2006 ; 15 ( suppl 3 ): iii71 – iii75 . 10.1136/tc.2004.008763 43. Hitchman SC , Fong GT , Zanna MP

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Michael J. Panza, Scott Graupensperger, Jennifer P. Agans, Isabelle Doré, Stewart A. Vella and Michael Blair Evans

 al., 2013 ; Jewett et al., 2014 ; Sabiston et al., 2016 ) drew data from the Nicotine Dependence in Teens Study and two studies (i.e.,  Agans & Geldhof, 2012 ; Zarrett et al., 2009 ) drew data from the 4-H Study of Positive Youth Development. The majority of studies were published in the past 10 years