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Vaithehy Shanmugam, Sophia Jowett, and Caroline Meyer

In the current study, we had two aims. First, we investigated the associations between eating psychopathology, situational interpersonal difficulties, and dispositional interpersonal difficulties among athletes and nonathletes. Second, we examined the mediating role of self-critical perfectionism, self-esteem, and depression in these associations. A total of 152 athletes and 147 nonathletes completed self-report instruments pertaining to relationship quality with significant others, as well as social anxiety, loneliness, self-critical perfectionism, self-esteem, depression, and eating psychopathology. Social anxiety and loneliness were found to be the only significant independent predictors of eating psychopathology among both athletes and nonathletes. However, such associations were indirectly mediated through depression for athletes and through self-critical perfectionism, self-esteem, and depression for nonathletes. The findings of this study suggest that the psychosocial mechanisms involved in the eating psychopathology of athletes are relatively similar to that of nonathletes. Thus, it can be tentatively proposed that treatments and interventions that target reducing interpersonal conflicts currently available for the general population should also be offered to athletes.

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Özlem Feyzioğlu, Özgul Öztürk, Bilsen Sirmen, and Selim Muğrabi

of such an accelerated program on nonathletes and compared its clinical results with elite athletes. From this point of view, our study aim was to compare the same accelerated rehabilitation program’s functional outcomes between elite athletes and nonathletes. We hypothesized that an accelerated

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Nenad Ponorac, Mira Popović, Dea Karaba-Jakovljević, Zorislava Bajić, Aaron Scanlan, Emilija Stojanović, and Dragan Radovanović

and macrophage recycling of iron, further contributing to the high number of athletes commonly diagnosed with ID ( Peeling, 2010 ). As such, female athletes may be at a heightened risk of disrupted iron regulation compared with nonathletes. Despite the general consensus that female athletes possess a

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Jessyca N. Arthur-Cameselle and Molly Curcio

of qualitative studies on the emotional, personal, and social experiences of (non-athlete) women who have recovered (e.g.,  Linville, Brown, Sturm, & McDougal, 2012 ). Though many studies have explored the process and course of recovery, far fewer have focused specifically on the initial motivation

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Laura K. Fewell, Riley Nickols, Amanda Schlitzer Tierney, and Cheri A. Levinson

Eating disorders (EDs) are serious illnesses with the highest mortality rate among all psychiatric disorders ( Harris & Barraclough, 1998 ). The prevalence of EDs has been found to be higher in athletes than non-athletes: non-athletes hold a lifetime prevalence rate of up to 4.6% ( Sundgot

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Matthew D. Bird, Graig M. Chow, Gily Meir, and Jaison Freeman

-athletes may be experiencing these issues at higher rates when compared to non-athletes. Wolanin, Hong, Marks, Panchoo, and Gross ( 2016 ) found 23.7% of student-athletes in their study to be showing clinically relevant symptoms of depressive disorder, while Yang et al. ( 2007 ) identified 21% of a sample of

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Laura K. Fewell, Riley Nickols, Amanda Schlitzer Tierney, and Cheri A. Levinson

are needed to investigate the effectiveness of exercise within intensive ED treatment centers for all patients, particularly athlete patients. Current Study The present study investigates the effectiveness of incorporating exercise into intensive ED treatment for athletes and non-athletes

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Claudia G. Levenig, Michael Kellmann, Jens Kleinert, Johanna Belz, Tobias Hesselmann, Jahan Heidari, and Monika I. Hasenbring

LBP, who display a DER pattern according to the AEM. A negative body image, however, might also be present in individuals showing FAR, as damage to the body could lead to anticipatory anxiety and negative thoughts. 26 However, athletes showed lower levels of avoidance compared with nonathletes. 27

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Richard E. Tahtinen and Hafrun Kristjansdottir

symptoms ( Gouttebarge et al., 2015 ; Nixdorf et al., 2013 ), other studies have assessed prevalence rates among North American collegiate athletes and non-athletes, and reported lower depression prevalence rates in athletes than non-athletes ( Armstrong, Burcin, Bjerke, & Early, 2015 ; Armstrong & Oomen

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Canan Koca and F. Hulya Asci

The purpose of this study was to compare gender role orientation and classification of elite female athletes aged between 18 to 30 years with age-matched female non-athletes in Turkey. Additionally, gender role differences with regard to types of sport in elite female athletes were examined. In this study 306 elite female athletes (Mage = 22.17 ± 2.51) and 264 female non-athletes (Mage = 21.34 ± 3.14) were participants of this study. Female athletes were selected from feminine sports; ballet dancing, aerobic dance, swimming, ice skating, tennis, volleyball (n = 70), from masculine sports; basketball, handball, soccer, wrestling, weight lifting, taekwando, karate, judo (n = 127), and from gender-neutral sports; track and field, shot putting and javelin throwing (n = 109). The Bern Sex Role Inventory was administered to assess the gender role orientations of participants. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) showed that there were significant differences in gender role orientation between elite female athletes from different types of sport and female non-athletes (Hotelling’s T2 = 0.145; F(6,112) = 13.63; p<.01). In a follow-up univariate analysis, a significant difference in masculinity (F(3,569) = 26.07; p<.01) scores between female athletes from different types of sport and female non-athletes were observed. In addition, a chi square analysis showed a significant difference in gender role classifications between elite female athletes from different types of sport and female non-athletes (X2 = 68.22; p<. 01). Based on these findings it was concluded that there were significant differences in gender role orientations between Turkish elite female athletes and nonathletes.