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David L. Nichols, Charlotte F. Sanborn, Eve V. Essery, Rachel A. Clark and Jennifer D. Letendre

The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of jumping activities and nutrition education on bone accretion in prepubescents. Fourth-grade children were divided into four groups: jumping (n = 61), nutrition (n = 9), jumping plus nutrition (n = 14), and control (n = 28). Interventions spanned the fourth and fifth grade academic years. Assessments were gathered at 0, 8 and 20 months. Baseline BMD values were (mean ± SD): lumbar (0.752 ± 0.095 g/cm2), neck (0.794 ± 0.089 g/cm2) and total (0.907 ± 0.060 g/cm2). There was a significant increase in BMD over time. However, the interventions produced no significant effects. Twice weekly jumping and/or biweekly nutrition education did not influence bone accrual.

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Katelyn Barnes, Lauren Ball and Ben Desbrow

Personal trainers are well placed to provide nutrition care in line with their recommended scope of practice. However, providing nutrition care beyond their recommended scope of practice has been identified as an industry risk. The International Confederation of Registers for Exercise Professionals (ICREPs) have international standards for nutrition knowledge and skills that are recommended for all fitness professionals, including personal trainers. This study investigates whether the ICREPs standards align with i) national nutrition education standards and ii) national nutrition occupational standards and scopes of practice for personal trainers within ICREPs affiliated countries. Content analysis of each standard and/or scope of practice was undertaken to extract nutrition statements. Extracted statements were matched with nutrition components of the ICREPs standards to result in a score based on the number of aligned ICREPs knowledge and skills criteria. Ten countries, with 16 organizations, were identified as being involved in the development of national education standards, occupational standards, or scopes of practice for personal trainers. The educational and occupational standards varied widely among countries and had minimal alignment with the ICREPs standards. As such, the expected role of personal trainers in providing nutrition care appeared to differ between countries. Further work is required to support personal trainers to develop a level of knowledge and skills that enables the provision of safe, consistent, and effective nutrition care.

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José Joaquín Muros, Mikel Zabala, María Jesús Oliveras-López, Paula Rodríguez Bouzas, Emily Knox, José Ángel Rufián-Henares and Herminia López-García de la Serrana

Background:

The aim of this study was to determine the effects of nutritional education and vigorous physical activity on health-related parameters.

Methods:

The sample group consisted of 134 children from 5 rurally located schools. Participants were divided between 5 different experimental groups: control group (CG), physical activity group (PA), nutritional education group (NE), combined intervention group (PA+NE), and a combined intervention group with additional substitution of normally used oil for extra virgin olive oil (EVOO; PA+NE+EVOO). The intervention consisted of 60 minute sessions of physical activity held twice a week as well as nutritional education sessions held over 6 months.

Results:

Students in the groups receiving physical activity reduced their fat percentage and increased their muscle mass post intervention. At posttest the lipid profile improved in all intervention groups. The proportion of macronutrients and dietary cholesterol improved in the groups receiving nutritional education. The posttest comparison showed significantly lower fat percentage, sum of skinfolds and waist circumference in NE relative to CG and PA relative to CG. Diastolic blood pressure and glycaemia were significantly lower in PA+NE+EVOO relative to CG.

Conclusion:

A school-based program consisting of nutritional education or nutritional education plus a physical activity program showed a positive effect on health-related parameters in children.

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Angela de Silva, Yasas Samarasinghe, Dhammika Senanayake and Pulani Lanerolle

Intake of dietary supplements is widespread among athletes in developed countries. This study evaluated the use of dietary supplements in athletes from a developing country. Dietary supplementation practices of 113 national-level athletes age 15–35 yr in Sri Lanka were assessed. All athletes from track-and-field, badminton, football, swimming, cycling, and karate squads who consented to participate in the study were administered an anonymous questionnaire by an interviewer. Information on number of supplements taken, frequency of use, nature of product, rationale, sources of advice, and reasons for taking supplements was obtained. Most athletes (94%) consumed dietary supplements. On average, 3.7 products/day were consumed. Footballers had significantly lower intake of supplements than other athletes (footballers 71%, others 98%; p < .05). They also consumed fewer products per day (footballers 0.7, others 3.5; p < .05). Popular supplements included multivitamins, vitamin E, calcium, energy foods and drinks, and creatine. Multiple supplement use was common, with 29% athletes taking 4 products/day. The athletes sought advice on supplement use from sports doctors (45%), team coaches (40%), or friends (15%). Most took supplements to improve performance (79%), and 19% claimed to take supplements to improve their overall health status. Dietary supplement use is widespread among national-level Sri Lankan athletes. The ad hoc use of supplements indicates that educational intervention in the sporting community is essential.

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Regina Belski, Alex Donaldson, Kiera Staley, Anne Skiadopoulos, Erica Randle, Paul O’Halloran, Pam Kappelides, Steve Teakel, Sonya Stanley and Matthew Nicholson

to improve the nutrition knowledge of coaches and increase their self-efficacy in advising young Australian football players about nutrition. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a simple nutrition education session embedded in a mandatory Australian football coach education course

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Maria Heikkilä, Raisa Valve, Mikko Lehtovirta and Mikael Fogelholm

focus does not assess nutrition knowledge properly, whereas a valid instrument does and can also detect potential knowledge gaps ( Spronk et al., 2014 ). Information thus obtained can then be used in, for example, the planning of targeted and effective nutrition education interventions ( Devlin & Belski

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Daniel P. Joaquim, Claudia R. Juzwiak and Ciro Winckler

assesses the quality of food consumed using tools such as quality indexes. In previous decades, several tools for assessing diet quality have been developed based on dietary guidelines to direct food choices or to develop nutritional education activities. Among them, for instance, the Healthy Eating Index

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Hani Kopetschny, David Rowlands, David Popovich and Jasmine Thomson

capturing their intentions. An understanding of athletes’ intentions is important to developing nutrition education strategies ( Karpinski & Milliner, 2016 ) particularly due to the importance of peer experience in informing practice in this cohort ( Robins & Hetherington, 2005 ). Athletes’ training plans

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Alba Reguant-Closa, Margaret M. Harris, Tim G. Lohman and Nanna L. Meyer

Athlete’s Plate nutrition education tool The AP was launched during the 2012 London Olympics and has been in use since then by the USOC sport dietitians and internationally, as it is available for free download at www.uccs.edu/swell/athletes-plate . To date, the AP has not been validated. Validation is

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Claire Blennerhassett, Lars R. McNaughton, Lorcan Cronin and S. Andy Sparks

symptoms of exercise-associated hyponatremia has led to a number of fatalities ( Rosner & Kirven, 2007 ). Therefore, assessing baseline nutrition knowledge of athletes could facilitate targeted nutrition education to optimize nutritional status during ultraendurance training and competition. Previous