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Matthew R. Nagy, Molly P. O’Sullivan, Shannon S. Block, Trevor R. Tooley, Leah E. Robinson, Natalie Colabianchi and Rebecca E. Hasson

Despite the known benefits of physical activity, less than 50% of children in the United States meet the national physical activity recommendations of 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per day. 1 Overweight/obese (OW/OB) children fare even worse with only 20%–40% meeting the

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Mynor Rodriguez-Hernandez, Jeffrey S. Martin, David D. Pascoe, Michael D. Roberts and Danielle W. Wadsworth

duration conditions on postprandial glucose (PPG) content in an at-risk population of sedentary normoglycemic obese women. We chose to evaluate obese, sedentary women given that women meet physical activity guidelines less than males, 4 and because obesity is also linked to SED, 9 affects nearly 4 in 10

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Marissa A. Kobayashi, Tae Kyoung Lee, Rafael O. Leite, Blanca Noriega Esquives, Guillermo Prado, Sarah E. Messiah and Sara M. St. George

Pediatric obesity in the United States has remained exceedingly high for well over a decade, 1 with ethnic minorities carrying a disproportionate burden of the epidemic compared with their non-Hispanic white counterparts. 2 In particular, Hispanic youth have the highest prevalence of obesity (25

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Alexei Wong, Marcos A. Sanchez-Gonzalez, Won-Mok Son, Yi-Sub Kwak and Song-Young Park

The prevalence of obesity among children and adolescents has become a major public health concern. In fact, obesity is associated with a variety of inflammatory disorders, including insulin resistance (IR), hypertension, and development of atherosclerosis, which are risk factors for cardiovascular

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James A. Levine

The know-how is available to reverse the obesity epidemic. Reversing obesity is a societal necessity because it is the predominant contributor to chronic ill health in developed countries and a growing precipitant of illness in middle and low-income countries. In the United States, for example, obesity is the chief driver of health care costs in a country that can no longer afford health care. Although some might advocate population-wide medication use to mitigate the effects of obesity on health, the more direct response is to end obesity. The goal of this paper is explain how mass-scalable obesity containment can be designed, built, and disseminated. Scalable Obesity Solutions (S.O.S.) are discussed from concept through deployment.

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Hyung Joon Joo, Sang-A Cho, Jae-Young Cho, Seunghun Lee, Jae Hyung Park, Cheol Woong Yu, Soon Jun Hong and Do-Sun Lim

Background:

Although the relationship between physical activity and arterial stiffness has been shown in healthy persons, it remains controversial in obese persons.

Methods:

From January 2014 to September 2014, we evaluated 795 obese subjects from 25 public health centers in Seoul, Korea. We compared physical activity and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) between obese subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS) (MO) and obese subjects without MetS (NMO).

Results:

The MO group had more men, higher body mass index (BMI), higher fasting glucose level, lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol level, and higher triglyceride level. The mean physical activity levels were similar between the 2 groups. baPWV was higher in the MO group than the NMO group. MO group showed positive correlation between baPWV and physical activity (P trend = 0.04). Interestingly, baPWV was significantly higher in the MO group than in the NMO group in subjects with moderate and vigorous physical activity (1403.4 cm/sec vs 1349 cm/sec [95% CI 21.4 to 87.4], P < .05). Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was apparently associated with age, BMI, blood pressure, and glucose level.

Conclusions:

In a community-based population, baPWV was higher in obese MetS group compared with obese non-MetS group. Physical activity showed different association with baPWV depending on metabolic status.

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Holiday A. Durham, Miriam C. Morey, Cheryl A. Lovelady, Rebecca J. Namenek Brouwer, Katrina M. Krause and Truls Østbye

Background:

Low physical activity (PA) during the postpartum period is associated with weight retention. While patterns of PA have been examined in normal weight women during this period, little is known about PA among overweight and obese women. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate PA and determine the proportion of women meeting recommendations for PA.

Methods:

Women (n = 491), with a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m2 were enrolled in a behavioral intervention. PA was assessed at six weeks postpartum using the Seven-Day PA Recall.

Results:

Women averaged 923 ± 100 minutes/day of sedentary/ light and 33 ± 56 minutes/day of combined moderate, hard, and very hard daily activity. Women with a BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2 reported more time in sedentary/light activities and less hours of sleep than those with a lower BMI. Only 34% met national PA guidelines; this proportion was significantly lower among blacks (OR 0.5, CI 0.3−0.9).

Conclusions:

These overweight and obese postpartum women reported a large percentage of time spent in sedentary/light activity, and a high proportion failed to meet minimal guidelines for PA. Promotion of PA in the postpartum period should focus on reducing sedentary behaviors and increasing moderate PA.

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Eimear Keane, Xia Li, Janas M. Harrington, Anthony P. Fitzgerald, Ivan J. Perry and Patricia M. Kearney

Purpose:

Globally, public health policies are targeting modifiable lifestyle behaviors. We explore the independent association of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary behavior on the risk of childhood overweight/obesity.

Method:

A cross-sectional survey of children aged 8–11 years (N = 826). Objective body mass index was used to classify children as normal weight or overweight/obese. Children wore wrist-worn Geneactiv accelerometers for 7-days and thresholds were applied to categorize MVPA and sedentary time. Screen time (ST) was parent reported. Poisson regression examined the independent association of (1) MVPA (2), objective sedentary time and (3) ST on the risk of overweight/obesity.

Results:

Overall, 23.7% (95% CI, 20.8–26.6%) of children were overweight/obese. On average, children spent 10.8% of waking time at MVPA and 61.3% sedentary. One-fifth (22.1%, 95% CI, 19.3–25.0%) of children achieved MVPA recommendations (≥ 60 min each day) and 17.5% (95% CI, 14.9–20.1%) met ST recommendations (<2 hr per day). Time spent at MVPA was inversely associated with the risk of overweight/obese independent of total sedentary time. Total time spent sedentary was not associated with overweight/obese independent of MVPA. ST was associated with an increased risk of overweight/obese independent of physical activity.

Conclusion:

Few schoolchildren met physical activity and screen time recommendations suggesting population based measures are needed.

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Kyu-Jin Lee, Yun-A. Shin, Kyoung-Young Lee, Tae-Won Jun and Wook Song

The purpose of this study was to assess differences in the levels of plasma visfatin among female adolescents and changes in plasma visfatin and insulin resistance in obese female adolescents after 12 wk of aerobic exercise training. Twenty normal-weight female students (body-mass index [BMI] <22.9 kg/m2 and body fat ≤29.9) and 18 obese female students (BMI ≥25 kg/m2 and body fat ≥30%) participated in this study. Eleven obese students were assigned to an exercise group and completed a 12-wk aerobic exercise-training program that included four 40- to 50-min sessions per wk with an energy expenditure of 300–400 kcal/d. Seven obese students were assigned to a control group that received no exercise sessions or dietary restriction. The plasma visfatin levels of obese female adolescents were significantly higher (p < .05) than those of the normal-weight female adolescents. The plasma visfatin levels (294.00 ± 124.74 ng/ml to 185.55 ± 67.30 ng/ml, p < .01) and insulin resistance (p < .05) were significantly reduced after 12 wk of aerobic exercise. The results suggest that aerobic exercise resulting in an energy expenditure of 1,200–1,600 kcal/wk for 12 wk decreases plasma visfatin and insulin resistance in obese female adolescents.

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Paul A. McAuley, Haiying Chen, Duck-chul Lee, Enrique Garcia Artero, David A. Bluemke and Gregory L. Burke

Background:

The influence of higher physical activity on the relationship between adiposity and cardiometabolic risk is not completely understood.

Methods:

Between 2000–2002, data were collected on 6795 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) participants. Self-reported intentional physical activity in the lowest quartile (0–105 MET-minutes/week) was categorized as inactive and the upper three quartiles (123–37,260 MET-minutes/week) as active. Associations of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference categories, stratified by physical activity status (inactive or active) with cardiometabolic risk factors (dyslipidemia, hypertension, upper quartile of homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR] for population, and impaired fasting glucose or diabetes) were assessed using logistic regression analysis adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity, and current smoking.

Results:

Among obese participants, those who were physically active had reduced odds of insulin resistance (47% lower; P < .001) and impaired fasting glucose/diabetes (23% lower; P = .04). These associations were weaker for central obesity. However, among participants with a normal waist circumference, those who were inactive were 63% more likely to have insulin resistance (OR [95% CI] 1.63 [1.24–2.15]) compared with the active reference group.

Conclusions:

Physical activity was inversely related to the cardiometabolic risk associated with obesity and central obesity.