Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 131 items for :

  • "obliquity" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Dale Bickham, Warren Young and Peter Blanch

Objective:

To determine the relationship between lumbopelvic (LP) stabilization strength and pelvic motion during running.

Design:

Runners were assessed for pelvic motion and undertook an LP stabilization strength test.

Participants:

Sixteen elite male middle- and long-distance runners.

interventions:

Pelvis kinematics were assessed while subjects ran at 5 m/s on a treadmill.

Main Outcome Measures:

Angular pelvis displacement was divided into 3 axes of rotation: pelvic tilt, obliquity, and rotation. LP stabilization strength was the capacity to resist increasing static loads applied to each leg and maintain a neutral LP zone. Intercorrelations were calculated for all measures of pelvic motion and LP stabilization strength.

Results:

There were no significant relationships found among any of the variables (P > .05). However, the LP stabilization strength test possessed good interday reliability.

Conclusions:

The relationship between pelvic motion and muscle function should be studied under a variety of other conditions.

Restricted access

Diane C. Westfall and Teddy W. Worrell

Anterior knee pain syndrome (AKPS) represents a significant problem for patients and sports medicine clinicians. Many predisposing factors have been associated with AKPS. Considerable attention has been given to quadriceps strengthening. Specifically the vastus medialis oblique (VMO) muscle is targeted for selective strengthening. Because of the VMO's oblique attachment to the patella, researchers report that proper dynamic alignment of the patella is dependent on VMO control. Given the lack of scientific information and agreement concerning the rehabilitation of patients with AKPS, the clinician and patient often become frustrated with the lack of progress during rehabilitation. Therefore the purpose of this paper is to clarify the current literature concerning the role of the VMO.

Restricted access

Francesca Wightman, Suzanne Delves, Caroline M. Alexander and Paul H. Strutton

Descending bilateral control of external oblique (EO) and latissimus dorsi (LD) was investigated using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Contralateral (CL) motor evoked potential (MEP) thresholds were lower and latencies were shorter than for ipsilateral (IL) MEPs. Hotspots for EO were symmetrical; this was not the case for LD. The volumes of drive to the left and right muscles were not different. The laterality index was not different between the left and right muscles. The average index for the EO muscles was closer to zero than that for LD, suggesting a stronger IL drive to EO. The symmetry of drive to each muscle did not differ; however, the symmetry of drive varies within a subject for different muscles and between subjects for the same muscle. The findings may be useful in understanding a number of clinical conditions relating to the trunk and also for predicting the outcome of rehabilitative strategies.

Restricted access

Lee Herrington and Stephen Pearson

Context:

One factor believed to affect Patella tracking is an alteration in the timing of the contraction of the muscular stabilizers of the patella. The muscles responsible for this are Vastus Medialis Oblique (VMO) and Vastus Laterialis (VL). A number of authors believe that asynchronous recruitment of the VMO muscle occurs in patella mal-tracking, with the VL muscle firing first and VMO firing first with normal tracking. This has lead to a variety of exercise interventions to reverse the situation with varying success. The discrepancy between the majority of the available research findings and the clinical hypothesis of VMO action or facilitation of this action may in part be due to methodological variability between studies, especially lack of control of the exercise variables of angular velocity and relative load.

Objective:

To assess the effect of different quadriceps exercises on VMO and VL EMG recruitment timing, while controlling load and velocity of contraction.

Design:

Repeated measures.

Setting:

Biomechanics laboratory.

Main Outcome Measures:

Differences in time of onset of muscle activity between VMO and VL.

Results:

No significant difference existed between gender (P = 0.78). Analysis factorial ANOVA (muscle, contraction type and exercise type) showed the main effects of muscle (P = 0.15) and type of contraction (P = 0.79) did not have a significant effect, the nature of exercise (OKC or CKC) had a significant effect (P < 0.001). The interaction of muscle and exercise type (P = 0.34) also had a nonsignificant effect.

Conclusions:

Onset timing does not differ significantly between VMO and VL during a variety of exercise tasks.

Restricted access

Lou Grant

Column-editor : Joseph J. Piccininni

Restricted access

James W. Youdas, Hannah E. Baartman, Brian J. Gahlon, Tyler J. Kohnen, Robert J. Sparling and John H. Hollman

be directed to movement at its distal end. Trunk muscles such as the external oblique, internal oblique, rectus abdominis, and erector spinae provide spinal stabilization, so the prime mover muscles (pectoralis major, anterior deltoid, serratus anterior, and triceps brachii) can generate forceful arm

Restricted access

Rodrigo Cappato de Araújo, Vinícius Yan Santos Nascimento, Rafaela Joyce Barbosa Torres, Francis Trombini-Souza, David Behm and Ana Carolina Rodarti Pitangui

fascia. Specifically, the existence of a continuity between the myofascial oblique muscles and the SA is described. 15 Recently, de Araújo et al 16 verified the existence of a positive correlation between the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the SA and EO during the execution of push-up on different

Restricted access

Timothy J. Gibbons and Marie-Louise Bird

), internal oblique abdominis (IO), and external oblique abdominis (EO). 9 Real-time ultrasound is used extensively in musculoskeletal investigations and has advantages when applied in rehabilitation. 11 Figure 1 —Image of Oov. The primary objective of this study was to compare ultrasound measurements of TrA

Restricted access

Carol A. Boliek, Reyhaneh Bakhtiari, Lauren Pedersen, Julia R. Esch and Jacqueline Cummine

intermuscular coherence strength in the 15- to 30-Hz bandwidth ( Stepp et al., 2011 ). As a starting point, we wanted to determine whether or not intermuscular coherence between internal interosseous (expiratory) intercostal and oblique muscles of the abdomen varied as a function of targeted lung volume

Restricted access

Kunal Bhanot, Navpreet Kaur, Lori Thein Brody, Jennifer Bridges, David C. Berry and Joshua J. Ode

Abbreviations: CAI, chronic ankle instability; LE, lower-extremity. The Biopac MP 36 System (Biopac Systems Inc, Santa Barbara, CA) was used to collect all the EMG data. 25 , 26 Surface EMG was collected from the erector spinae (ES), external oblique (EOB), and rectus abdominis (RA) bilaterally (ipsilateral