Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 58 items for :

  • "occupational socialization" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Anne M. Merrem and Matthew D. Curtner-Smith

Occupational socialization within physical education (PE) has been defined as “all kinds of socialization that initially influence persons to enter the field. . . and later are responsible for their perceptions and actions as teacher educators and teachers” ( Lawson, 1986 , p. 107). It is a

Restricted access

K. Andrew R. Richards and Thomas J. Templin

perspective is to adopt occupational socialization theory as a lens to understand how the physical education profession reproduces itself through intergenerational socialization ( Richards, Housner, & Templin, 2018 ). The purpose of this chapter is to present a conceptual framework for understanding PETE

Restricted access

Laura Prior and Matthew Curtner-Smith

specifically focused on the influence of occupational socialization on the curricula constructed and delivered by elementary teachers. This is a significant gap in the literature given the unique characteristics of elementary physical education in terms of organization, students, and culture. The purpose of

Restricted access

Chan Woong Park and Matthew D. Curtner-Smith

Following Lawson’s ( 1983a , 1983b ) early theoretical work, research examining the occupational socialization of mainstream physical education (PE) teachers in the last 34 years has provided much important information that helps to explain why PE teachers think and act in the ways that they do

Restricted access

Chan Woong Park and Matthew D. Curtner-Smith

occupational socialization on sport pedagogy IFMs’ perspectives and practices regarding physical education teaching and PETE. These perspectives might include overarching value orientations ( Jewett, 1994 ) for physical education and orientations toward a particular form of PETE ( Zeichner, 1983 ). During this

Restricted access

Hal A. Lawson

The following analysis is one-sided and selective. It is an attempt to derive guidelines for the design of teacher education programs from recent work on the occupational socialization of physical educationists. The work cited is limited almost exclusively to that completed by the author and his former students. This can be justified insofar as this analysis doubles as a benchmark for an additive and integrative research program, indicating which questions need to be asked next and signalling the practical significance of past work. The discussion begins with a definitional treatment of occupational socialization prior to identifying guidelines for teacher education programs.

Restricted access

Hal A. Lawson

Occupational socialization, together with selected works in cultural studies, offers analysts of the physical education curriculum a unique scholarly perspective. Presentation of this perspective proceeds by means of 11 primary assumptions about curriculum work and workers. Such a perspective helps to explain the absence of other theoretical perspectives in physical education, as well as the prevalence of competing technical models which are dominant, emergent, and residual. This perspective also calls attention to the relationship among teachers, teacher educators, curricula, and social structure.

Restricted access

Margaret Stran and Matthew Curtner-Smith

The purpose of this study was to (a) examine how two preservice teachers (PTs) interpreted and delivered the sport education (SE) model during their student teaching and (b) discover factors that led to the their interpreting and delivering the model in the ways they did. The theoretical framework used to guide data collection and analysis was occupational socialization. Data were collected using a variety of qualitative techniques and analyzed using standard interpretive methods. Results revealed that high quality SE-Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) facilitated both a commitment to the model and the ability to teach the full version of it for a teaching-oriented and moderately coaching-oriented PT. Key elements of SE-PETE responsible for this commitment and competence appeared to be the teaching of prescribed mini-seasons before student teaching, the conditions encountered by PTs during teaching practice, and a host of PETE faculty characteristics congruent with the general PETE occupational socialization literature.

Restricted access

Hong-Min Lee and Matthew D. Curtner-Smith

The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of occupational socialization on the perspectives and practices of sport pedagogy doctoral students in terms of physical education (PE) teaching and physical education teacher education (PETE). Participants were 12 students. Data were collected through formal and informal interviews, observations, and self-reflective posters. They were analyzed using analytic induction and constant comparison. Key findings were that doctoral students espoused both conservative and liberal forms of PE and PETE. These views were shaped by the various phases of their socialization. Doctoral students recalled being oriented to teaching and coaching. The longer coaching orientations remained intact, the more likely they were to espouse conservative versions of PE and PETE. The students’ graduate education was shown to be particularly potent and powerful. This appeared to be due to influential faculty, a practitioner focus in master’s degree programs, and engagement in undergraduate PETE.

Restricted access

K. Andrew Richards and Thomas J. Templin

Using occupational socialization theory, this investigation describes the socialization of Janet, an induction phase physical education (PE) teacher. Special attention was given to the forms of induction assistance Janet was exposed to during her first two years at Liberty Middle School. Data were collected through seven interviews with Janet and interviews with Janet’s mentor, principal, and assistant superintendent. Analyses were conducted using inductive analysis and the constant comparative method. Results indicate that Janet was exposed to several forms of assistance including a state wide induction assistance initiative called the State Mentoring and Assessment Program (S-MAP). She found the informal assistance provided by her teaching colleague and the community of practice they formed to be among the most important elements of her induction, and she was critical of the formal support she received through the S-MAP.