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Jairo H. Migueles, Alex V. Rowlands, Florian Huber, Séverine Sabia and Vincent T. van Hees

one-stop overview of the GGIR package, the papers underpinning the theory of GGIR, and how research contributes to the continued growth of the GGIR package. How Open Source Software Can Contribute to Advances in the Field of Physical Activity Measurement GGIR contributes to scientific discovery by

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Dinesh John, Qu Tang, Fahd Albinali and Stephen Intille

-user researcher, the application of summary acceleration metrics to perform different tasks in various types of accelerometer-based physical activity research may continue to serve as a reasonable alternative. This paper describes an open-source acceleration summary that is designed to maximally capture human

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Column-editor : Scott R. Sailor

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Steve Cernohous

Column-editor : Scott R. Sailor

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Alex V. Rowlands, Tatiana Plekhanova, Tom Yates, Evgeny M. Mirkes, Melanie Davies, Kamlesh Khunti and Charlotte L. Edwardson

brands of monitor can be processed and analyzed identically using open-source software, GGIR ( van Hees et al., 2013 , 2014 ), that is freely available, can easily be applied to large datasets, and is already used in epidemiological surveys (e.g.,  da Silva et al., 2014 ; Menai et al., 2017 ). Using

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In the article Migueles, J. H., Rowlands, A. V., Huber, F., Sabia, S., & van Hees, V. T. (2019). GGIR: A Research Community–Driven Open Source R Package for Generating Physical Activity and Sleep Outcomes From Multi-Day Raw Accelerometer Data. Journal for the Measurement of Physical Behaviour, 2

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Matthew S. Tenan, Andrew J. Tweedell and Courtney A. Haynes

appropriate for their given data set and not blindly apply the results from our studies. Ultimately, we believe this present scenario to be a demonstration of the benefits of Open Science practices. Without posting our raw data and using open source software packages, these potential inconsistencies would not

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Kelsey Lucca, David Gire, Rachel Horton and Jessica A. Sommerville

computer which emits a reading of force at .01 second intervals in pounds per square inch (PSI). There are open-source software programs available online that will read and store force measurements (e.g., Micro-Measurements MM01 MultiDAQ). In between readings, it is important to zero out the force reading

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Jacob A. Goldsmith, Cameron Trepeck, Jessica L. Halle, Kristin M. Mendez, Alex Klemp, Daniel M. Cooke, Michael H. Haischer, Ryan K. Byrnes, Robert F. Zoeller, Michael Whitehurst and Michael C. Zourdos

developed at a low cost (∼$250) and is “open source” (freely available manufacturing instructions). This study investigated the validity of OBS and TWAS versus OC3D. We hypothesized LPTs would produce similar velocity measurements to each other; but would be less accurate than OC3D. Methods Experimental

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Alex V. Rowlands

thresholds is highly correlated with volume of activity (eg, counts per day), meaning that it is difficult to explore relative contributions of volume and intensity of activity to health outcomes. • It should be possible to produce both metrics simply by using open-source, freely available software that