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Stephen W. Dittmore, G. Clayton Stoldt and T. Christopher Greenwell

This case study explores the use a Major League Baseball team’s organizational weblog. Organizational weblogs are forums for the 2-way exchange of information and commentary between an organization and its publics. Most sport organizations, however, have yet to embrace the weblog as a form of organizational communication. Recent research suggests a greater need to understand how sport organizations might use weblogs to outreach to target audiences from a communications perspective. This study assesses whether readers perceive an organization’s official weblog to be an effective form of 2-way communication and profiles the readers of an organizational weblog based on demographics, consumption patterns, and points of attachment. Results showed that readers perceived the organizational weblog to be highly conversational and effective at communicating organizational commitment. In addition, readers were voracious media consumers of the team’s games, repeat ticket customers, and highly identified, both with the sport and with the team.

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Ted Hayduk III and Matt Walker

Human-resource management is a unique challenge for professional sport franchises (PSFs). A lack of research on full-time employees in sport means we know little about the perceptions of those most connected to PSFs despite the unique nature of the sport industry. This paper investigates whether communicating socially responsible behavior (SRB) in sport job postings generates more prospective person–organization fit (POFit) and greater application intention. Uncovering these relationships will help sport practitioners optimize their hiring process by targeting recruitment messages. The analysis does not support the idea that communicating SRB in a sport job posting enhances prospective POFit or application intentions, even for socially conscious applicants. These findings contradict similar exercises carried out in other industries, highlighting the distinctiveness of professional sport.

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Amy Baker, Mary A. Hums, Yoseph Mamo and Damon P.S. Andrew

The importance of mentoring in the development of individual careers is noted in the business and higher education literature. However, prior research has given little attention to the development of mentoring relationships between junior and senior sport management faculty members. In addition to providing context-specific information, mentorship studies of sport management faculty provide insight on an emerging and gender-imbalanced discipline in the academy. This study reviews the literature on mentorship, and presents a hybrid framework on the mentor–protégé relationships established in the academic field of sport management. Specifically, the study identifies aspects of the relationships likely to yield positive perceptual outcomes, such as relationship effectiveness, trust, and job satisfaction. Data were collected from 161 sport management faculty members in the United States and Canada. The results provide support for the new hybrid framework and highlight mentoring as a valuable mechanism to support sport management faculty.

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Brody J. Ruihley, Jason Simmons, Andrew C. Billings and Rich Calabrese

, as well as the organizational communication from fantasy hosts, this research was able to gather insight into public and organizational reaction in a time of crisis. With that, the purpose of this case study was to explore organizational communication strategy and stakeholder response surrounding the

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Glynn M. McGehee, Armin A. Marquez, Beth A. Cianfrone and Timothy Kellison

implications of organizational communication to diverse groups of stakeholders regarding a stadium-centered development project by identifying and discussing the emerging themes of (a) GSU’s communication to public stakeholders via social media throughout the planning process of the stadium project and (b) the

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Russell E. Ward Jr.

Despite suggestions that mission statements represent a strategic component of organizational communication, there has been little research of these documents in athletic departments at U.S. colleges and universities. The purpose of this research was to explore the relationship between mission statement content and athletic department accomplishments in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I schools (N = 343). The content analysis of mission statements revealed that athletics missions do not differentiate accomplished from less accomplished athletic programs. Athletic departments with strong traditions of promoting the academic advancement of student-athletes, achieving gender equity, and complying with NCAA rules tend to reference these distinctions in the same way as departments with less favorable histories. Grounded in institutional theory, this article describes the external pressures toward sameness rather than differentiation in mission statement content. Implications for intercollegiate athletics and higher education are discussed.

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David Hunnicutt

A serious problem facing contemporary athletic departments is increasing bureaucratization. Further, many management scholars feel that bureaucracies inhibit human creativity and organizational communication. Ironically, the traits of creativity and communication are the very ingredients that helped athletic departments achieve success. This paper discusses the idea of integrating athletic administration and staff into a unified community of achievers by implementing a Japanese participative management technique known as quality circles into the organization. The paper (a) defines quality circles, (b) gives their origin, (c) presents an overview of quality circles in U.S. industry, (d) points to the need for quality circles in university athletic departments, and (e) discusses the implementation of quality circles into athletic departments.

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Emily M. Newell

men’s sports. These chapters also expand beyond traditional sports and provide examples of emerging and niche sports like mixed martial arts, in terms of both fan following and media coverage. A third grouping of chapters focuses on interpersonal and organizational communication throughout each level

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Jeffrey W. Kassing

aspiration of FCB. Strategic ambiguity is a concept developed in organizational communication that recognizes and identifies how and when organizations intentionally disseminate ambiguous messages (i.e., ones that have multiple vs. singular meanings) to achieve particular goals ( Eisenberg, 1984 ). This case

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Nadège Levallet, Norm O’Reilly, Elizabeth Wanless, Michael Naraine, Ethan Alkon and Wade Longmire

Communication channels are important for the fan experience, be it through peer-to-peer communication among fans or fan-to-sport organization communication. Engaging sports fans has involved harnessing social media ( Naraine & Parent, 2016 ). Enabling consumption of social media within a venue increases the