Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,272 items for :

  • "outcome measures" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Luke M. Mueller, Ben A. Bloomer and Chris J. Durall

Clinical Scenario:

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are associated with a lengthy recovery time, decreased performance, and an increased rate of reinjury. To improve performance of the injured knee, affected athletes often undergo surgical reconstruction and rehabilitation. Determining when an athlete is ready to safely return to play (RTP), however, can be challenging for clinicians. Although various outcome measures have been recommended, their ability to predict a safe RTP is questionable.

Focused Clinical Question:

Which outcome measures should be used to determine readiness to return to play after ACL reconstruction?

Restricted access

Lori A. Michener

Outcome measures can be classified as clinician rated and patient rated. Clinician-rated measures predominantly assess impairments, whereas patient-rated measures, also known as patient-based measures, are designed to evaluate the impact of the injury on a patient’s daily activities, work, and recreation. Currently, there is a greater reliance on clinician-rated impairment measures for clinical decision making, specifically with treatment planning and assessing outcomes of care. To comprehensively evaluate the effect of an injury, patient-rated outcome measures must be used because they allow for the assessment of a patient’s ability to perform daily activities and participate in work and recreation that is affected by an injury. Clinician-rated impairment measures should be used to guide the development of a treatment program, and patient-rated measures should be used for both treatment-program development and assessing treatment outcomes in daily clinical practice. The purposes of this article are to describe patient- and clinician-rated outcome measures and to provide guidance and illustrate the benefits of the use of these measures in clinical decision making and documenting outcomes of care.

Restricted access

Patti Syvertson, Emily Dietz, Monica Matocha, Janet McMurray, Russell Baker, Alan Nasypany, Don Reordan and Michael Paddack

Context:

Achilles tendinopathy is relatively common in both the general and athletic populations. The current gold standard for the treatment of Achilles tendinopathy is eccentric exercise, which can be painful and time consuming. While there is limited research on indirect treatment approaches, it has been proposed that tendinopathy patients do respond to indirect approaches in fewer treatments without provoking pain.

Objective:

To determine the effectiveness of using a treatment-based-classification (TBC) algorithm as a strategy for classifying and treating patients diagnosed with Achilles tendinopathy.

Participants:

11 subjects (mean age 28.0 ±15.37 y) diagnosed with Achilles tendinopathy.

Design:

Case series.

Setting:

Participants were evaluated, diagnosed, and treated at multiple clinics.

Main Outcome Measures:

Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), Disablement in the Physically Active Scale (DPA Scale), Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment–Achilles (VISA-A), Global Rating of Change (GRC), and Nirschl Phase Rating Scale were recorded to establish baseline scores and evaluate participant progress.

Results:

A repeated-measures ANOVA was conducted to analyze NRS scores from initial exam to discharge and at 1-mo follow-up. Paired t tests were analyzed to determine the effectiveness of using a TBC algorithm from initial exam to discharge on the DPA Scale and VISA-A. Descriptive statistics were evaluated to determine outcomes as reported on the GRC.

Conclusion:

The results of this case series provide evidence that using a TBC algorithm can improve function while decreasing pain and disability in Achilles tendinopathy participants.

Restricted access

Alison R. Snyder and Tamara C. Valovich McLeod

Edited by Gary Wilkerson

Restricted access

Ellen C. Jørstad-Stein, Klaus Hauer, Clemens Becker, Marc Bonnefoy, Rachel A. Nakash, Dawn A. Skelton and Sarah E. Lamb

The purpose of the study was to identify physical activity questionnaires for older adults that might be suitable outcome measures in clinical trials of fall-injury-prevention intervention and to undertake a systematic quality assessment of their measurement properties. PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO were systematically searched to identify measurements and articles reporting the methodological quality of relevant measures. Quality extraction relating to content, population, reliability, validity, responsiveness, acceptability, practicality, and feasibility was undertaken. Twelve outcome measures met the inclusion criteria. There is limited evidence about the measures’ properties. None of the measures is entirely satisfactory for use in a large-scale trial at present. There is a need to develop suitable measures. The Stanford 7-day Physical Activity Recall Questionnaire and the Community Health Activities Model Program for Seniors questionnaire might be appropriate for further development. The results have implications for the designs of large-scale trials investigating many different geriatric syndromes.

Restricted access

Shana Harrington, Corinne Meisel and Angela Tate

Context:

The prevalence of shoulder pain in the competitive swimming population has been reported to be as high as 91%. Female collegiate swimmers have a reported shoulder-injury rate 3 times greater than their male counterparts. There has been little information on how to best prevent shoulder pain in this population. The purpose of this study was to examine if differences exist in shoulder range of motion, upper-extremity strength, core endurance, and pectoralis minor length in NCAA Division I female swimmers with and without shoulder pain and disability.

Methods:

NCAA Division I females (N = 37) currently swimming completed a brief survey that included the pain subscale of the Penn Shoulder Score (PSS) and the sports/performing arts module of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Outcome Measure. Passive range of motion for shoulder internal rotation (IR) and external rotation (ER) at 90° abduction was measured using a digital inclinometer. Strength was measured using a handheld dynamometer for scapular depression and adduction, scapular adduction, IR, and ER. Core endurance was assessed using the side-bridge and prone-bridge tests. Pectoralis minor muscle length was assessed in both a resting and a stretched position using the PALM palpation meter. All measures were taken on the dominant and nondominant arms.

Results:

Participants were classified as positive for pain and disability if the following 2 criteria were met: The DASH sports module score was >6/20 points and the PSS strenuous pain score was ≥4/10. If these criteria were not met, participants were classified as negative for pain and disability. Significant differences were found between the 2 groups on the dominant side for pectoralis muscle length at rest (P = .003) and stretch (P = .029).

Conclusions:

The results provide preliminary evidence regarding an association between a decrease in pectoralis minor length and shoulder pain and disability in Division I female swimmers.

Restricted access

J. Robert Grove, Peter J. Norton, Judy L. Van Raalte and Britton W. Brewer

Restricted access

Fadi M. Al Zoubi and Richard A. Preuss

Measuring lumbar spine range of motion (ROM) using multiple movements is impractical for clinical research, because finding statistically significant effects requires a large proportion of subjects to present with the same impairment. The purpose of this study was to develop a single measure representing the total available lumbar ROM. Twenty participants with low back pain performed three series of eight lumbar spine movements, in each of two sessions. For each series, an ellipse and a cubic spline were fit to the end-range positions, measured based on the position of the twelfth thoracic vertebra in the transverse plane of the sacrum. The area of each shape provides a measure of the total available ROM, whereas their center reflects the movements’ symmetry. Using generalizability theory, the index of dependability for the area and anterior-posterior center position was found to be 0.90, but was slightly lower for the mediolateral center position. Slightly better values were achieved using the spline-fitting approach. Further analysis also indicated that excellent reliability, and acceptable minimal detectable change values, would be achieved with a single testing session. These data indicate that the proposed measure provides a reliable and easily interpretable measure of total lumbar spine ROM.

Restricted access

Allan Munro, Lee Herrington and Michael Carolan

Context:

Two-dimensional (2D) video analysis of frontal-plane dynamic knee valgus during common athletic screening tasks has been purported to identify individuals who may be at high risk of suffering knee injuries such as anterior cruciate ligament tear or patellofemoral pain syndrome. Although the validity of 2D video analysis has been studied, the associated reliability and measurement error have not.

Objective:

To assess the reliability and associated measurement error of a 2D video analysis of lower limb dynamic valgus.

Design:

Reliability study.

Participants:

20 recreationally active university students (10 women age 21.5 ± 2.3 y, height 170.1 ± 6.1 cm, weight 66.2 ± 10.2 kg, and 10 men age 22.6 ± 3.1 y, height 177.9 ± 6.0 cm, weight 75.8 ± 7.9 kg).

Main Outcome Measurement:

Within-day and between-days reliability and measurement-error values of 2D frontal-plane projection angle (FPPA) during common screening tasks.

Interventions:

Participants performed single-leg squat and drop jump and single-leg landings from a standard 28-cm step with standard 2D digital video camera assessment.

Results:

Women demonstrated significantly higher FPPA in all tests except the left single-leg squat. Within-day ICCs showed good reliability and ranged from .59 to .88, and between-days ICCs were good to excellent, ranging from .72 to .91. Standard error of measurement and smallest detectable difference values ranged from 2.72° to 3.01° and 7.54° to 8.93°, respectively.

Conclusions:

2D FPPA has previously been shown to be valid and has now also been shown to be a reliable measure of lower extremity dynamic knee valgus. Using the measurement error values presented along with previously published normative data, clinicians can now make informed judgments about individual performance and changes in performance resulting from interventions.