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Inhyang Choi, Damian Haslett, Javier Monforte, and Brett Smith

Para-sport activism is gaining attention around the world due to the potential of disabled elite athletes to highlight forms of oppression that disabled people experience, such as negative attitudes, inaccessible environments, or social exclusion (see Haslett & Smith, 2020 ). In Para-sport

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Jessica J. Ferguson and Nancy L.I. Spencer

view that disability is considered to be incoherent with athleticism, and fewer developmental sport opportunities for women experiencing disability as well as more men than women experiencing disability participating in parasport and holding positions of power ( Blinde, & McCallister, 1999 ; Buysse

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Pierre Lepage, Gordon A. Bloom, and William R. Falcão

lead to the enhancement of psychological factors, such as autonomy, competence, and confidence ( Harvey et al., 2009 ; Malone et al., 2012 ; Shapiro & Martin, 2010 ). Finally, participation in parasport provides youth with a sense of community by creating meaningful peer relationships that are often

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Erik L. Lachance and Milena M. Parent

through a focus on the impacts and interrelationships of satisfaction, motivation, commitment, and sense of community, rather than a single outcome (e.g., satisfaction). An additional issue within the sport (event) volunteer literature pertains to research on para-sport (event) volunteers. In comparison

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Marte Bentzen, Danielle Alexander, Gordon A. Bloom, and Göran Kenttä

and behaviors to better meet the personal and athletic needs of the athletes or team ( Lara-Bercial & Mallet, 2016 ). Research incorporating the definition of coaching effectiveness has been documented in the parasport literature to better understand coaching knowledge on a professional, interpersonal

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Laura Misener, Kerri Bodin, and Marika Kay

NSGB’s members, as well as working with the provincial/territorial organizations associated with the NSGB. Recently, there has been a government mandate to provide inclusive, equitable, and accessible programming for athletes of all abilities. As such, Katie’s sport organization and its parasport

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Kirsti Van Dornick and Nancy L.I. Spencer

Parasport 1 has grown significantly over the past 60 years, with the Paralympic Games becoming the second largest multisport event on Earth ( Steadward & Peterson, 1997 ). To gain access to competitive parasport, athletes with physical, sensory, and intellectual impairment are classified

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Laura Misener, Landy Di Lu, and Robert Carlisi

research was to address this gap by examining the case of a strategic partnership that emerged as an event-leveraging tactic. The focal case is on the Ontario Parasport Legacy Group 1 (OPLG), which developed in conjunction with the hosting of the Toronto 2015 Parapan American Games as a means to increase

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Marion E. Hambrick, Mary A. Hums, Glenna G. Bower, and Eli A. Wolff

Elite athletes require the most advanced sports equipment to maintain their competitive edge, but manufacturers cannot always satisfy these athletes’ specific equipment needs. Sport involvement can influence sports-equipment selections and is described as the process by which individuals rely on attitudes and belief systems to make sports-related consumption decisions. This study involved semistructured interviews with 5 elite Parasport athletes to identify and analyze the role of sport involvement in their selection of sports equipment. The results revealed that the athletes identified product limitations, created a collaborative environment, and promoted a culture of innovation to develop new sports products and address existing limitations. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

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Shaunna L. Taylor, Penny Werthner, and Diane Culver

The complex process of sport coaching is a dynamic and evolving practice that develops over a long period of time. As such, a useful constructivist perspective on lifelong learning is Jarvis’ (2006, 2009) theory of human learning. According to Jarvis, how people learn is at the core of understanding how we can best support educational development. The purpose of the current study is to explore the lifelong learning of one parasport coach who stood out in his feld, and how his coaching practice evolved and developed throughout his life. A thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2006) was used to extract themes and examples from three two-hour interviews as well as interviews with key collaborators in his coaching network. The findings reveal a coach whose coaching practice is founded on pragmatic problem solving in the face of a lack in resources; an investment in formal and nonformal adapted activity education at the start of his parasport career; and observation, communication, and relationship-building with his athletes and the parasport community. Suggestions are provided for coach developers on how they might invest resources and create learning opportunities for coaches of athletes with a disability.