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Kacey C. Neely and Nicholas L. Holt

The overall purpose of this study was to examine parents’ perspectives on the benefits of sport participation for their young children. Specifically, this study addressed two research questions: (1) What benefits do parents perceive their children gain through participation in organized youth sport programs? (2) How do parents think their children acquire these benefits? Twenty-two parents (12 mothers, 10 fathers) of children aged 5-8 years participated in individual semistructured interviews. Data were subjected to qualitative analysis techniques based on the interpretive description methodology. Parents reported their children gained a range of personal, social, and physical benefits from participating in sport because it allowed them to explore their abilities and build positive self-perceptions. Parents indicated they believed children acquired benefits when coaches created a mastery-oriented motivational climate that facilitated exploration. Crucially, parents appeared to play the most important role in their children’s acquisition of benefits by seizing “teachable moments” from sport and reinforcing certain principles in the home environment.

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Alice M. Buchanan, Benjamin Miedema, and Georgia C. Frey

“ecological models are particularly applicable to PA” (p. 379) because participation is often restricted by places and settings. Indeed, physical environments, as well as social and cultural values, are all aspects of ecological models that are known to guide behavior. Because of our focus on parents

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Leanne K. Elliott, Jonathan A. Weiss, and Meghann Lloyd

parentsperspectives. For the remainder of this work, the terms “participants” and “parents” will be used interchangeably to describe those who were interviewed. Procedures The parents were interviewed within a 6- to 9-month period following their child’s participation in the motor skill intervention

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Donna L. Goodwin, David A. Fitzpatrick, Robin Thurmeier, and Carol Hall

This phenomenological study explored the decision-making experience of parents whose children joined Special Olympics programs. The experiences of 16 families with children 10-22 years old were gathered through interviews, artifacts, and field notes. Three themes emerged from the thematic analysis (a) thoughtful instruction, (b) finding the fit, and (c) security of acceptance. Parents sought instructors who were interested in building relationships with their children and creating anxiety-free instructional environments for them. A good program fit occurred when instructors had expectations for motor skill development and increased independence. Parents also preferred environments that encouraged meaningful peer interactions. The findings were interpreted within the context of self-determination theory.

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Camilla J. Knight and Nicholas L. Holt

The purposes of this study were to identify the strategies parents use to be able to support their children’s involvement in competitive tennis and identify additional assistance parents require to better facilitate their children’s involvement in tennis. Interviews were conducted with 41 parents of junior players in the United States. Data analysis led to the identification of 4 strategies parents used to be able to support to their children: spouses working together, interacting with other parents, selecting an appropriate coach, and researching information. Five areas where parents required additional assistance were also identified. These were understanding and negotiating player progression, education on behaving and encouraging players at tournaments, evaluating and selecting coaches, identifying and accessing financial support, and managing and maintaining schooling. These findings indicated that parents “surrounded themselves with support” to facilitate their children’s involvement in tennis but required additional information regarding specific aspects of tennis parenting.

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Lundqvist * Fredrik Sandin * 9 2014 28 28 3 3 245 245 254 254 10.1123/tsp.2013-0024 ParentsPerspectives on the Benefits of Sport Participation for Young Children Kacey C. Neely * Nicholas L. Holt * 9 2014 28 28 3 3 255 255 268 268 10.1123/tsp.2013-0094 Olympic Athletes’ Experiences of a Post Games

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Decision to Join Special Olympics: ParentsPerspectives Donna L. Goodwin * David A. Fitzpatrick * Robin Thurmeier * Carol Hall * 4 2006 23 2 163 183 10.1123/apaq.23.2.163 Integration of Disability Sport in the Norwegian Sport Organizations: Lessons Learned Marit Sørensen * Nina Kahrs * 4 2006

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and Assistance Required to Facilitate Children’s Involvement in Tennis: ParentsPerspectives Camilla J. Knight * Nicholas L. Holt * 9 2013 27 27 3 3 281 281 291 291 10.1123/tsp.27.3.281 Research Note Getting Them on the Same Page: A Method to Study the Consistency of Coaches’ and Athletes

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Witte * Monique A.M. Berger * Marco J.M. Hoozemans * Dirkjan H.E.J. Veeger * Lucas H.V. van der Woude * 1 10 2017 34 4 382 400 10.1123/apaq.2016-0125 apaq.2016-0125 ParentsPerspectives of Physical Activity in Their Adult Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Social-Ecological Approach

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Bobbi-Jo Atchison and Donna L. Goodwin

). Transition in physical recreation and students with cognitive disabilities: Graduate and parent perspectives . Education and Training in Developmental Disabilities, 42 , 94 – 106 . Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/23880142 Sandelowski , M. ( 1993 ). Theory unmasked: The uses and guises of