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Xihe Zhu and Justin A. Haegele

), including those with visual impairments ( Ayvazoglu et al., 2006 ), is highly associated to engagement among siblings and parents. However, it is unknown if reactivity is consistent across the family unit. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine differences in reactivity to accelerometer

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Camilla J. Knight

, athletes will seek support from a range of sources including coaches, teammates, partners, and teachers ( Wylleman & Lavallee, 2004 ). One of the most influential sources, particularly for children and adolescents, is their parents. 1 Through their involvement, the vast majority of parents positively

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J.D. DeFreese, Travis E. Dorsch and Travis A. Flitton

Youth sport is a prominent relational and developmental context for youth and their parents. As many as 44 million children and adolescents participate in organized youth sport in the United States each year ( Bremer, 2012 ; National Council of Youth Sports 2008). Based on these nearly ubiquitous

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Sharon E. Taverno Ross

This paper provides an overview of the growing U.S. Latino population, the obesity disparity experienced by this population, and the role of parents and physical activity in promoting a healthy weight status in Latino preschool children. The main portion of this paper reviews seven intervention

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Pedro Teques, Luís Calmeiro, Henrique Martins, Daniel Duarte and Nicholas L. Holt

Parents exert a powerful influence on their children’s sporting experiences via the emotional climate they create. This emotional climate can be conveyed in numerous settings, including the family home ( Holt, Tamminen, Black, Mandigo, & Fox, 2009 ), during car rides ( Tamminen, Poucher

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Ethan E. Hull, Jeannette M. Garcia, Angela M. Kolen and Robert J. Robertson

Background:

New parents have to adjust to less sleep, less free time, and more responsibility as a result of having a child. The purpose of this study was to examine how having a child impacts the physical activity (PA) beliefs and behaviors of new parents over a 2- to 3-year time period.

Methods:

Participants included 49 men and women (31% men, 96% white) who did not have a child at baseline (26.3 ± 1.1 years old) but did have a child at the time of follow-up (28.9 ± 1.7 years old). The child’s mean age at follow-up was 12 ± 7 months old. PA was measured via questionnaire at baseline and again at follow-up. Interviews regarding PA occurred at follow-up.

Results:

PA significantly decreased in parents across the time period (P < .001), and parents attributed this decrease to having a child and being pregnant. Parents mentioned they lack time, energy, and motivation for PA as a result of caring for a new child. Parents who maintained their activity level stated they prioritized PA and chose activities they enjoyed.

Conclusion:

These results show that although activity levels decrease in individuals who have a child, PA in new parents may be a function of priority, intensity, and enjoyment.

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Joanna M. Kesten, Russ Jago, Simon J. Sebire, Mark J. Edwards, Laura Pool, Jesmond Zahra and Janice L. Thompson

Background:

Interventions to increase children’s physical activity (PA) have achieved limited success. This may be attributed to inaccurate parental perceptions of their children’s PA and a lack of recognition of a need to change activity levels.

Methods:

Fifty-three parents participated in semistructured interviews to determine perceptions of child PA. Perceptions were compared with children’s measured MVPA (classified as meeting or not meeting UK guidelines) to produce 3 categories: “accurate,” “over-estimate,” and “under-estimate.” Deductive content analysis was performed to understand the accuracy of parental perceptions.

Results:

All parents of children meeting the PA guidelines accurately perceived their child’s PA; while the majority of parents whose child did not meet the guidelines overestimated their PA. Most parents were unconcerned about their child’s PA level, viewing them as naturally active and willing to be active. Qualitative explanations for perceptions of insufficient activity included children having health problems and preferences for inactive pursuits, and parents having difficulty facilitating PA in poor weather and not always observing their child’s PA level. Social comparisons also influenced parental perceptions.

Conclusions:

Strategies to improve parental awareness of child PA are needed. Perceptions of child PA may be informed by child “busyness,” being unaware of activity levels, and social comparisons.

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Katie Teller, Mark Abbey-Lambertz, Nasira Sharma, Alan Waite, Scott Ickes and Jason A. Mendoza

, in which children walk to and from school in groups accompanied by parents and other adult chaperones. 11 Students join the WSB at designated stops along a route, similar to a traditional school bus. The WSBs can bring a multitude of benefits, including increased physical activity, 12 increased

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Meredith George and Matthew D. Curtner-Smith

on their children’s behavior and development in educational settings ( Chen, Dornbusch, & Liu, 2007 ), a primary influence on these reactions and perceptions is likely to be the beliefs, values, and perceptions of parents. To date, there has been little direct research of parental beliefs about and

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Jon C. Hellstedt

Coaches often have difficulty working with the parents of their athletes. Communication problems, conflict, and sometimes power struggles over who has control over the child’s training occasionally develop. Based on an integration of sport psychology and family systems theory, a model for understanding the coach / parent / athlete triangle is developed. Three types of parents are described: overinvolved, underinvolved, and moderately involved, as well as goals and strategies for working with each type of parent.