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Deirdre Dlugonski, Katrina D. DuBose, Christine M. Habeeb, and Patrick Rider

the study. After excluding 7 parent–child dyads who had less than 2 shared days of accelerometer wear, the final sample included 47 parent–child dyads (n = 24 mothers; 51%). Procedure All study procedures and materials were reviewed and approved by the East Carolina University institutional review

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Mayrena I. Hernandez, Kevin M. Biese, Dan A. Schaefer, Eric G. Post, David R. Bell, and M. Alison Brooks

, but with a different set of research questions. 3 , 5 Additionally, the parent–child dyad information is also novel. Methods Design This study is a cross-sectional descriptive survey of youth athletes and parents of youth athletes, as well as related parent–child dyads. Recruitment occurred at

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Nicole E. Nicksic, Meliha Salahuddin, Nancy F. Butte, and Deanna M. Hoelscher

-perceived neighborhood safety and parent- and child-reported child’s outdoor PA, using data from parent–child dyads who participated in the Texas Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (TX CORD) study. We hypothesized that parents’ perceptions of a safe neighborhood will be associated with parental encouragement of

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Byungmo Ku, Megan MacDonald, Bridget Hatfield, and Kathy Gunter

The purpose of this study was to test a modified conceptual model of the associations between parental supports and physical activity (PA) orientations and the PA behaviors of young children with developmental disabilities (DDs). In total, 135 parents of young children with DDs completed a questionnaire, which consisted of 67 questions. A pathway analysis indicated that tangible and intangible parental supports were significantly associated with PA behaviors in young children with DDs (β = 0.26, p = .01, and β = 0.24, p = .02, respectively). Tangible parental support was positively associated with parents’ PA behaviors and PA enjoyment (β = 0.22, p < .001, and β = 0.13, p = .04, respectively). Intangible parental support was positively associated with parents’ PA behaviors and PA importance (β = 0.19, p = .05, and β = 0.33, p < .001, respectively). In addition, parental PA behaviors and parents’ perceptions of their children’s motor performance were both directly associated with PA behaviors in young children with DDs. These results highlight the importance of parental support and PA orientations in relation to the PA behaviors of young children with DDs.

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Eleanor B. Tate, Anuja Shah, Malia Jones, Mary Ann Pentz, Yue Liao, and Genevieve Dunton

Background:

Research on adolescent physical activity is mixed regarding the role of parent activity. This study tested parent encouragement, direct modeling, and perceived influence as moderators of objectively-measured (accelerometer) parent and child moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) associations.

Methods:

Parent-child dyads (n = 423; mean child age = 11.33 yrs.) wore accelerometers for 7 days; parents completed surveys. Hierarchical linear regression models tested moderation using a product of constituent terms interaction.

Results:

Parent-reported encouragement moderated the association between parent and child MVPA (β = –.15, P = .01, ΔR 2 = .02, P < .01). Among parents with lower MVPA, child MVPA was higher for children receiving high encouragement (mean = 3.06, SE = .17) vs. low (mean = 3.03, SE = .15, P = .02) and moderate encouragement (mean = 3.40, SE = .09) vs. low (P = .04).

Conclusions:

Physical activity promotion programs may use parent encouragement as a tool to boost child activity, but must consider other child and parent characteristics that could attenuate effects.

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Jamie Lau, Lina Engelen, and Anita Bundy

Background:

After-school hours provide an opportunity for physical activity (PA). Parental perceptions influence children’s PA. The aims were to: compare parents’ perceptions of children’s PA with objectively measured PA; shed light on PA during after-school hours; and compare two electronic devices for collecting data.

Methods:

Twenty parent-child dyads participated. Children (5–7 years, mean 6.25 ± 0.64) wore Actical accelerometers; their parents responded to activity diaries on electronic devices. Data were collected twice for 4 consecutive weekday afternoons (15.30–19.00).

Results:

While parents perceived their children to be quite active, children were, in fact, largely inactive. Parents’ responses compared with accelerometer data yielded moderate correlations (r = .44, p < .01). Two thirds of parents’ responses were overestimations. Boys were physically more active than girls and had higher PA outdoors than indoors. Girls’ PA remained similar indoors and outdoors but parents did not perceive the similarity. Both electronic devices produced similar results and compliance rates.

Conclusion:

Parents consistently over-reported their children’s PA. Findings have implications for initiatives to increase PA. If parents perceive their children as very active, they may lack motivation to promote PA. Parents’ limitations as proxy reporters aside, the similarity of results yielded by the two electronic devices suggests that the choice is a matter of researcher preference.

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Paloma Flores-Barrantes, Greet Cardon, Iris Iglesia, Luis A. Moreno, Odysseas Androutsos, Yannis Manios, Jemina Kivelä, Jaana Lindström, Marieke De Craemer, and on behalf of the Feel4Diabetes Study Group

number of steps established (30,000 steps). After this process, a total of 250 parent–child dyads with complete data were selected. Descriptive statistics were computed for children and their parents, and differences between sex and parent–child dyads were examined. Continuous data were analyzed with t

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Erin Strutz, Raymond Browning, Stephanie Smith, Barbara Lohse, and Leslie Cunningham-Sabo

than children with lower activity levels. The null hypothesis stated that parent and child percentage of time spent in MVPA is not correlated across parent–child dyads. Alternative hypotheses were as follows: (1) parent–child MVPA levels are positively correlated, particularly during times that parents

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Sharon E. Taverno Ross

was a pilot study that built on the aforementioned Hip-Hop to Health Jr., while including a more substantial family component ( Fitzgibbon et al., 2013 ). This study randomized 72 parent–child dyads from two preschools to a family-based weight-control intervention and 74 dyads from two preschools to a

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Brad R. Julius, Amy M.J. O’Shea, Shelby L. Francis, Kathleen F. Janz, and Helena Laroche

aged 11–12 ( r s  = .52; P  < .001), and daughters ( r s  = .37; P  < .001). Mother’s waking hours spent with their children was only associated with MVPA of all children on WE ( r s  = .19; P  < .05). Table 2 Spearman Correlations Between Parent–Child Dyads Presented Overall and by Age and Gender