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Erica S. Albertin, Emilie N. Miley, James May, Russell T. Baker and Don Reordan

Clinical Scenario Hip osteoarthritis affects up to 28% of the population and is expected to rise as the American population ages. 1 , 2 Limited hip range of motion (ROM) has been identified as a predisposing factor to hip osteoarthritis and limited patient function (ability to complete pain

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James L. Farnsworth II, Todd Evans, Helen Binkley and Minsoo Kang

patient’s function has improved to be similar with their preinjury or noninjured state. To ensure that patients are receiving optimal care following injury, PROMs should be capable of measuring patient function across a wide spectrum ranging from low function (eg, an injured patient) to high function (eg

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Emily R. Hunt, Cassandra N. Parise and Timothy A. Butterfield

reliable and valid tools, they are subjective to normal patient function and how the patient feels during a given time frame. Several studies 5 , 14 showed that patients who opted to go through nonoperative treatment presented with better IKDC-2000 scores at baseline. However, the patient population of

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James L. Farnsworth II, Todd Evans, Helen Binkley and Minsoo Kang

, following injury, athletes often experience a reduction in physical performance; however, despite the decrease in performance, the majority of injuries do not result in time loss from competition. 8 For many clinicians, the goal of rehabilitation is to reduce pain levels and to improve patient function to

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Kristina L. Dunn, R. Curtis Bay, Javier F. Cárdenas, Matthew Anastasi, Tamara C. Valovich McLeod and Richelle M. Williams

. 1 , 2 These assessments are used to evaluate patient function immediately following injury and throughout recovery and it is suggested that measurements be similar to baseline values prior to returning the patient to athletic participation. In the sport setting, the use of serial testing requires

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Sara J. Golec and Alison R. Valier

health system and insurance database between January 2003 to December 2005. Outcome Measure(s) Guideline adherence: Determined by the percentage of quality indicators that were followed per patient. Function and Disability: Determined by scores on the Quebec Back Pain and Disability Scale (QBPDS). Pain

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Frank E. DiLiberto and Deborah A. Nawoczenski

profile of pathologies that affect midfoot integrity may better represent the effects of pathology on patient function. Posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction, diabetes mellitus, and midfoot arthritis are examples of pathologies that affect midfoot anatomy and kinematics, but have received minimal

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Christopher J. Burcal, Sunghoon Chung, Madison L. Johnston and Adam B. Rosen

Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are useful tools to assess patient function and monitor rehabilitation progress. The paper versions of PROs can be time-consuming due to manual grading, which may be a barrier to utilizing these outcomes. 1 Digital methods of administration (MOA) have been shown to

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Sarah Daniels, Gabriela Santiago, Jennifer Cuchna and Bonnie Van Lunen

inclusion in this critically appraised topic. These studies were selected because they were graded with a level of evidence of 4 or higher and examined the effects of LITUS on clinical outcomes (tissue temperature, pain, and patient function). Table 2 Characteristics of Included Studies Rigby et al 4 Lewis

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Serkan Usgu, Günseli Usgu, Fatma Uygur and Yavuz Yakut

, impairments, and quality of life. The obtained information provides important feedback and details about any disorderly function. 7 , 8 These patient-assessed outcome measures can be used in conjunction with FPTs to gain a more complete understanding of patientsfunctioning following injury. However