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James L. Farnsworth II, Todd Evans, Helen Binkley, and Minsoo Kang

The use of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) has been shown to increase adherence to rehabilitation and improve communication between patients and their clinician through measurement of important subjective outcomes, such as quality of life and other psychological, sociological, and

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James L. Farnsworth II, Todd Evans, Helen Binkley, and Minsoo Kang

Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) help clinicians evaluate patients’ perceptions of changes in their own health status. These tools are especially valuable for measuring attributes that cannot be directly measured, such as pain, or that are not pragmatic or feasible to measure (eg

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Revay O. Corbett, Tyler R. Keith, and Jay Hertel

suggested to be used to aid in the RTP decision-making process. Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) are collected using questionnaires to assess a patient’s perception of their injury, function, and overall well-being. Although these tools are widely used and accepted in research and clinical practice, they

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Erik A. Wikstrom, Sajad Bagherian, Nicole B. Cordero, and Kyeongtak Song

ankle joint mobilizations on patient-reported outcomes in patients with CAI remain unclear. Focused Clinical Question Do anterior-to-posterior ankle joint mobilizations improve patient-reported outcomes in patients with CAI? Summary of Search, “Best Evidence” Appraised, and Key Findings • The literature

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Jennifer F. Mullins, Arthur J. Nitz, and Matthew C. Hoch

thereby present valuable evidence in patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in individuals with CAI. 23 Therefore, the purpose of this Critically Appraised Topic (CAT) was to appraise the best evidence regarding the effects of DN on PROs in individuals with CAI. Focused Clinical Question Does DN improve PROs

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Mark A. Sutherlin

Clinical Scenario Widespread patient-reported outcome (PRO) use in athletic training is still marginal. 1 As sport injury pathologies tend to affect and are reported for individual body parts (e.g., ankle, knee, etc.) or more broadly across regions (e.g., the upper or lower extremity), 2 it is

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Johanna M. Hoch, Cori W. Sinnott, Kendall P. Robinson, William O. Perkins, and Jonathan W. Hartman

-oriented outcomes are used to subjectively assess a patient’s well-being and function and are often categorized into generic, region, and dimension-specific patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). 3 Clinician-oriented outcomes (CBOs) can be utilized to assess the effects of the health condition at the body

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Samuel F. Jazzo, Daniel Scribner, Stephanie Shay, and Kyung-Min Kim

to be more effective than hyaluronic acid, thus PRP should be the primary adjunct to microfracture surgery. The use of a postoperative PRP injection 6–24 hours after microfracture surgery showed favorable patient reported outcomes in patients with OCLs of the talus. PRP injections have psychological

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Emily R. Hunt, Cassandra N. Parise, and Timothy A. Butterfield

), using the PICO strategy. 11 • P atient/Client group: ACL rupture • I ntervention: nonoperative treatment protocol • C omparison: ligamentous reconstruction OR no • O utcome: patient-reported outcomes AND muscular strength Figure 1 —Summary of search history and included studies. Sources of Evidence

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Christopher J. Burcal, Sunghoon Chung, Madison L. Johnston, and Adam B. Rosen

Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are useful tools to assess patient function and monitor rehabilitation progress. The paper versions of PROs can be time-consuming due to manual grading, which may be a barrier to utilizing these outcomes. 1 Digital methods of administration (MOA) have been shown to