Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 78 items for :

  • "peak height velocity" x
Clear All
Restricted access

David Rodríguez-Rosell, Felipe Franco-Márquez, Fernando Pareja-Blanco, Ricardo Mora-Custodio, Juan M. Yáñez-García, José M. González-Suárez and Juan J. González-Badillo

Purpose:

To analyze the effects of low-load, high-velocity resistance training (RT) combined with plyometrics on physical performance in pre-peak-height-velocity (PHV) soccer players.

Methods:

Thirty young soccer players from the same academy were randomly assigned to either a strength training (STG, n = 15) or a control group (CG, n = 15). Strength training consisted of full squat exercise with low load (45–58% 1RM) and low volume (4–8 repetitions/set) combined with jumps and sprints twice a week over 6 wk of preseason. The effect of the training protocol was assessed using sprint performance over 10 and 20 m, countermovement jump, estimated 1-repetition maximum, and average velocity attained against all loads common to pre- and posttests in full squat.

Results:

STG showed significant improvements (P = .004–.001) and moderate to very large standardized effects (ES = 0.71–2.10) in all variables measured, whereas no significant gains were found in CG (ES = –0.29 to 0.06). Moreover, significant test × group interactions (P < .003–.001) and greater between-groups ESs (0.90–1.97) were found for all variables in favor of STG compared with CG.

Conclusion:

Only 6 wk of preseason low-volume and low-load RT combined with plyometrics can lead to relevant improvements in strength, jump, and sprint performance. Thus, the combination of field soccer training and lightweight strength training could be used for a greater development of the tasks critical to soccer performance in pre-PHV soccer players.

Restricted access

Job Fransen, Stephen Bush, Stephen Woodcock, Andrew Novak, Dieter Deprez, Adam D.G. Baxter-Jones, Roel Vaeyens and Matthieu Lenoir

surrounding the adolescent growth spurt (±12 y in girls and ±14 y in boys), individuals’ BA can differ by as much as 4 years ( 31 ). These differences are particularly apparent around the age at peak height velocity (APHV) and reflect the large variations in the timing and tempo of growth among individuals

Restricted access

Eric E. Wickel, Joey C. Eisenmann and Gregory J. Welk

Background:

This study compared physical activity levels among early, average, and late maturing boys and girls.

Methods:

Physical activity was assessed with an Actigraph accelerometer in 161 (76 boys, 85 girls) 9 to 14 year olds over 7 consecutive days. Anthropometric variables were measured and the maturity offset (ie, years from peak height velocity) was predicted. Biological maturity groups (early, average, and late) were created based on the mean estimated age at peak height velocity for boys and girls separately.

Results:

Levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were similar between early, average, and late maturing boys and girls after adjusting for differences in chronological age. Levels of MVPA progressively declined across chronological age in boys and girls (P < .001) and gender differences existed at 10-, 12-, and 13-years, with boys having higher levels than girls (P < .05). When aligned according to biological age, gender-related differences in MVPA did not exist.

Conclusions:

Within this sample of 9 to 14 year old boys and girls, there were no significant differences in MVPA among early, average, and late maturing individuals.

Restricted access

Robert M. Malina, Audrey C. Choh, Stefan A. Czerwinski and Wm. Cameron Chumlea

Sex-specific equations for predicting maturity offset, time before or after peak height velocity (PHV), were evaluated in 63 girls and 74 boys from the Fels Longitudinal Study. Serially measured heights (0.1 cm), sitting heights (0.1 cm), weights (0.1 kg), and estimated leg lengths (0.1 cm) from 8 to 18 years were used. Predicted age at PHV (years) was calculated as the difference between chronological age (CA) and maturity offset. Actual age at PHV for each child was derived with a triple logistic model (Bock-Thissen-du Toit). Mean predicted maturity offset was negative and lowest at 8 years and increased linearly with increasing CA. Predicted ages at PHV increased linearly with CA from 8 to 18 years in girls and from 8 to 13 years in boys; predictions varied within relatively narrow limits from 12 to 15 years and then increased to 18 years in boys. Differences between predicted and actual ages at PHV among youth of contrasting maturity status were significant across the age range in both sexes. Dependence of predicted age at PHV upon CA at prediction and on actual age at PHV limits its utility as an indicator of maturity timing and in sport talent programs.

Restricted access

Raouf Hammami, Anis Chaouachi, Issam Makhlouf, Urs Granacher and David G. Behm

Balance, strength and power relationships may contain important information at various maturational stages to determine training priorities.

Purpose:

The objective was to examine maturity-specific relationships of static/dynamic balance with strength and power measures in young male athletes.

Methods:

Soccer players (N = 130) aged 10–16 were assessed with the Stork and Y balance (YBT) tests. Strength/power measures included back extensor muscle strength, standing long jump (SLJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), and 3-hop jump tests. Associations between balance with strength/power variables were calculated according to peak-height-velocity (PHV).

Results:

There were significant medium-large sized correlations between all balance measures with back extensor strength (r = .486–.791) and large associations with power (r = .511–.827). These correlation coefficients were significantly different between pre-PHV and circa PHV as well as pre-PHV and post-PHV with larger associations in the more mature groups. Irrespective of maturity-status, SLJ was the best strength/power predictor with the highest proportion of variance (12–47%) for balance (i.e., Stork eyes opened) and the YBT was the best balance predictor with the highest proportion of variance (43–78%) for all strength/power variables.

Conclusion:

The associations between balance and muscle strength/power measures in youth athletes that increase with maturity may imply transfer effects from balance to strength/power training and vice versa in youth athletes.

Restricted access

Kyle S. Beyer, Jeffrey R. Stout, Michael J. Redd, Kayla M. Baker, Haley C. Bergstrom, Jay R. Hoffman and David H. Fukuda

study due to scheduling conflicts. This study was approved by the University of Central Florida Institutional Review Board and was conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki. Peak Height Velocity Estimation Each participant’s years from peak height velocity (PHV) was estimated using

Restricted access

Olaf Prieske, Helmi Chaabene, Christian Puta, David G. Behm, Dirk Büsch and Urs Granacher

national talent selection camp that was organized in February 2017 by the German Handball Federation. Participants’ maturity offset was determined by calculating years from peak height velocity (PHV) according to the sex-specific formula introduced by Mirwald et al. 16 All handball players were classified

Restricted access

Reid J. Reale, Timothy J. Roberts, Khalil A. Lee, Justina L. Bonsignore and Melissa L. Anderson

independent variable to consider when developing RMR prediction equations in adolescents. Mirwald et al. ( 2002 ) developed a noninvasive, practical, and reliable method to assess maturation via the prediction of years to peak height velocity (the age at when the maximum rate of growth occurs) accurate to

Restricted access

André O. Werneck, Evelyn C.A. Silva, Maria R.O. Bueno, Lidyane Z. Vignadelli, Adewale L. Oyeyemi, Catiana L.P. Romanzini, Enio R.V. Ronque and Marcelo Romanzini

). Somatic maturation was estimated through the estimated age at peak height velocity (PHV) ( 17 ). Socioeconomic status was assessed through the Associação Brasileira de Empresas de Pesquisa (ABEP) questionnaire ( 2 ). Statistical Analyses Mean and SD were used to describe the sample. Student t test was

Restricted access

Paul J. Read, Jon L. Oliver, Gregory D. Myer, Mark B.A. De Ste Croix and Rhodri S. Lloyd

Epidemiological data indicate that injury rates increase linearly from 9 to 18 years of age in elite male youth players ( 32 ), and a period of heightened risk occurs during peak height velocity (PHV) ( 39 ). Rapid changes in stature and mass are likely contributing factors to altered movement, and