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Tim Takken, Nynke de Jong and on behalf of the Dutch Physical Activity Report Card Study Group

Introduction National surveillance data in the Netherlands show that the percentage of children and youth, who meet the Dutch physical activity guidelines has decreased significantly between 2006 and 2014. 1 Data from the 2016 Dutch Physical Activity Report Card showed that only a minority of

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Marcella Burghard, Karlijn Knitel, Iris van Oost, Mark S. Tremblay, Tim Takken and the Dutch Physical Activity Report Card Study Group

Background:

The Active Healthy Kids the Netherlands (AHKN) Report Card consolidates and translates research and assesses how the Netherlands is being responsible in providing physical activity (PA) opportunities for children and youth (<18 years). The primary aim of this article is to summarize the results of the 2016 AHKN Report Card.

Methods:

Nine indicators were graded using the Active Healthy Kids Global Alliance report card development process, which includes a synthesis of the best available research, surveillance, policy and practice findings, and expert consensus.

Results:

Grades assigned were: Overall Physical Activity Levels, D; Organized Sport Participation, B; Active Play, B; Active Transportation, A; Sedentary Behaviors, C; Family and Peers, B; School, C; Community and the Built Environment, A; Government Strategies and Investments, INC.

Conclusions:

Sedentary behavior and overall PA levels are not meeting current guidelines. However, the Dutch youth behaviors in sports, active transportation, and active play are satisfactory. Several modifiable factors of influence might be enhanced to improve these indicators or at least prevent regression. Although Dutch children accumulate a lot of daily PA through cycling, it is not enough to meet the current national PA guidelines of 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous PA per day.

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Shujun Gao, Lisa Harnack, Kathryn Schmitz, Janet Fulton, Leslie Lytle, Pamela Van Coevering and David R. Jacobs Jr.

Background:

We assessed the validity and reliability of a modified Godin-Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire in youth in grades 6 through 8.

Methods:

The questionnaire was completed by 250 children twice at a 1 wk interval to assess reliability. After the second questionnaire administration the children wore an accelerometer for 7 d (criterion measure).

Results:

Pearson correlations between the first and second reports of frequency of participation in strenuous and moderate physical activity were 0.68 and 0.51, respectively. Self-reported participation in strenuous activity was weakly correlated with strenuous activity as measured by accelerometer (r = 0.23, P = 0.01). A weak non-significant correlation was found between reported versus measured engagement in moderate activity (r = 0.13, P = 0.07).

Conclusion:

Findings suggest the questionnaire evaluated in this study may be of very limited use for assessing children’s physical activity.

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Kenneth E. Powell and Steven N. Blair

Nearly 25 years ago, Jeremy Morris ( 1994 ) declared physical activity to be the “best buy in public health.” Morris, the epidemiologist credited with publishing the first modern scientific evidence of the cardiovascular health benefits of physical activity ( Morris, Heady, Raffle, Roberts, & Parks

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Karin A. Pfeiffer and Michael J. Wierenga

Physical inactivity is a recognized independent risk factor for mortality and chronic morbidity in adults ( Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee, 2018 ). Specific to the U.S. context, physical inactivity is estimated on average to cause 11% of premature mortality and 7% of disease burden

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Leigh Ann Ganzar, Nalini Ranjit, Debra Saxton and Deanna M. Hoelscher

Physical activity provides numerous health benefits for children by facilitating energy balance, 1 , 2 assisting in the prevention of chronic disease, 3 improving bone strength, 4 and reducing depression and mental stress. 5 The current guidelines in the United States for physical activity

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Kazuhiro Harada, Sangyoon Lee, Sungchul Lee, Seongryu Bae, Yuya Anan, Kenji Harada and Hiroyuki Shimada

). Previous studies have suggested that physical activity can minimize one’s risk of developing cognitive impairments ( Blondell, Hammersley-Mather, & Veerman, 2014 ; Sofi et al., 2011 ) and dementia ( Aarsland, Sardahaee, Anderssen, Ballard, & the Alzheimer's Society Systematic Review group, 2010 ; Beckett

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MinKyoung Song, Robert F. Corwyn, Robert H. Bradley and Julie C. Lumeng

Childhood obesity continues to be an epidemic. 1 , 2 Given that low levels of physical activity increase the risk for obesity, 3 , 4 the importance of physical activity among youth cannot be overemphasized. 5 , 6 Unfortunately, despite increased efforts to promote physical activity levels by

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Inácio Crochemore M. da Silva, Grégore I. Mielke, Andréa D. Bertoldi, Paulo Sergio Dourado Arrais, Vera Lucia Luiza, Sotero Serrate Mengue and Pedro C. Hallal

Over 5 million deaths per year are attributable to physical inactivity, which is responsible for 9% of all-cause mortality. 1 Strategies to promote physical activity have been implemented in different settings, and there is currently a better understanding on the correlates of physical activity at

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Leehu Zysberg and Rotem Hemmel

Physical activity (PA) is considered a health-promoting behavior and is associated in the literature with life expectancy, quality of life, well-being, and additional positive health outcomes. 1 – 3 Studies have explored social and environmental aspects shaping PA patterns and levels focusing