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Tim Takken, Nynke de Jong and on behalf of the Dutch Physical Activity Report Card Study Group

Introduction National surveillance data in the Netherlands show that the percentage of children and youth, who meet the Dutch physical activity guidelines has decreased significantly between 2006 and 2014. 1 Data from the 2016 Dutch Physical Activity Report Card showed that only a minority of

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Marcella Burghard, Karlijn Knitel, Iris van Oost, Mark S. Tremblay, Tim Takken and the Dutch Physical Activity Report Card Study Group

Background:

The Active Healthy Kids the Netherlands (AHKN) Report Card consolidates and translates research and assesses how the Netherlands is being responsible in providing physical activity (PA) opportunities for children and youth (<18 years). The primary aim of this article is to summarize the results of the 2016 AHKN Report Card.

Methods:

Nine indicators were graded using the Active Healthy Kids Global Alliance report card development process, which includes a synthesis of the best available research, surveillance, policy and practice findings, and expert consensus.

Results:

Grades assigned were: Overall Physical Activity Levels, D; Organized Sport Participation, B; Active Play, B; Active Transportation, A; Sedentary Behaviors, C; Family and Peers, B; School, C; Community and the Built Environment, A; Government Strategies and Investments, INC.

Conclusions:

Sedentary behavior and overall PA levels are not meeting current guidelines. However, the Dutch youth behaviors in sports, active transportation, and active play are satisfactory. Several modifiable factors of influence might be enhanced to improve these indicators or at least prevent regression. Although Dutch children accumulate a lot of daily PA through cycling, it is not enough to meet the current national PA guidelines of 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous PA per day.

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Matthew O. Fullmer, Carol Wilkinson, Keven A. Prusak, Dennis Eggett and Todd Pennington

Due, in part, to leisure-time inactivity, obesity and related chronic health issues effect the lives of many adolescents in the United States ( Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2015a ; Currie et al., 2012 ). Participating regularly in physical activity is a key factor in maintaining

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Ayse Meydanlioglu and Ayse Ergun

overweight children increased from 4.2% in 2013 to 14.6% in 2016 in Turkey. 6 In recent years, the decrease in participation in physical activities has also become an important problem in addition to the obesity among children. 7 , 8 In Turkey, according to the data of the “Turkey Nutrition and Health

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Chris Hopkins

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a highly prevalent disease among older adults ( Lawrence et al., 2008 ) and one of the leading causes of functional loss and disability ( Cross et al., 2014 ). Physical activity has been deemed crucial to optimal health outcomes, which has led to federal recommendations for

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Volker Cihlar and Sonia Lippke

lifestyle factor is physical activity, which will therefore be investigated in the current study. Regular physical activity supports healthy aging in the sense that it helps individuals to remain healthy or to improve their health. Physical activity reduces the risk for most of the common causes of death

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Roger J. Paxton, Jeri E. Forster, Matthew J. Miller, Kristine L. Gerron, Jennifer E. Stevens-Lapsley and Cory L. Christiansen

than 3 million per year projected by 2030 ( Kurtz et al., 2007 ). TKA reliably reduces pain and improves self-reported functional performance postoperatively ( Bruun-Olsen, Heiberg, Wahl, & Mengshoel, 2013 ), yet physical activity levels are not typically increased after TKA ( Brandes, Ringling, Winter

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Kerstin Gerst Emerson and Jennifer Gay

higher prevalence of hypertension, obesity, and diabetes ( Mensah, Mokdad, Ford, Greenlund, & Croft, 2005 ). The disparity in risk factors is particularly intriguing because they are more amenable to interventions, such as increasing physical activity. Epidemiologic evidence consistently points to a

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Richard Cooke, Helena Trebaczyk, Peter Harris and Alison J. Wright

The present study tests whether a self-affirmation intervention (i.e., requiring an individual to focus on a valued aspect of their self-concept, such as honesty) can increase physical activity and change theory of planned behavior (TPB) variables linked to physical activity. Eighty young people completed a longitudinal intervention study. Baseline physical activity was assessed using the Godin Leisure-Time Physical Activity Questionnaire (LTPAQ). Next, participants were randomly allocated to either a self-affirmation or a nonaffirmation condition. Participants then read information about physical activity and health, and completed measures of TPB variables. One week later, participants again completed LTPAQ and TPB items. At follow up, self-affirmed participants reported significantly more physical activity, more positive attitudes toward physical activity, and higher intentions to be physically active compared with nonaffirmed participants. Neither attitudes nor intentions mediated the effects of self-affirmation on physical activity. Self-affirmation can increase levels of physical activity and TPB variables. Self-affirmation interventions have the potential to become relatively simple methods for increasing physical activity levels.

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Christine E. Roberts, Louise H. Phillips, Clare L. Cooper, Stuart Gray and Julia L. Allan

to maintain ADL and IADL abilities during old age are of prime importance. Mounting evidence from large-scale epidemiological studies, randomized controlled trials, and meta-analytic reviews offer compelling evidence that physical activity positively influences older adults’ abilities to carry out