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Kate Hovey, Diana Niland and John T. Foley

Purpose: Self-efficacy, having been identified as a factor influencing teacher effectiveness, combined with the increased prevalence of outdoor education (OE) content being taught within physical education contexts, warrants the need for physical education teacher education (PETE) programs to address OE outcomes. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if participation in an OE program increased self-efficacy to teach OE among PETE students. Methods: PETE students (N = 95) were taught OE content in multiple residential environments and were evaluated using the “Survey of Self-efficacy for Teaching Outdoor Education.” Results: Results indicated a significant increase in self-efficacy scores from pretest to posttest in all content areas (OE skills, group dynamic skills, and models and theories). Overall, the OE program had a large effect in changing self-efficacy scores. Conclusion: Participation in the program positively affected PETE students’ self-efficacy for teaching OE, which may improve their ability to ultimately teach this content in physical education settings.

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K. Andrew R. Richards and Kim C. Graber

Background/Purpose: Teacher educators must help students overcome faulty beliefs they developed through acculturation while also retaining highly qualified candidates through to graduation. This aspect of this study sought to understand physical education teacher education program coordinators’ perspectives about their role in the process of student retention. Method: Participants included physical education teacher education program coordinators who completed an online survey as detailed in Chapter 4. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics, with attention to differences across Carnegie Classification. Results: There was relative alignment between the perceived effectiveness of recruitment strategies and the extent to which they were employed. There was also a preference for strategies that develop relationships among students. Limited differences were noted across Carnegie Classifications. Discussion/Conclusion: Physical education doctoral programs should prepare future faculty members to serve retention roles, but complete retention of students whose beliefs do not align with best practice may not be desirable.

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Shrehan Lynch and Matthew D. Curtner-Smith

different difference: Students reading of critical pedagogy in PETE . In D. Garbett & A. Ovens (Eds.), Teaching for tomorrow today (pp.  431 – 438 ). Auckland, New Zealand : Edify Ltd . Philpot , R. , & Smith , W. ( 2018 ). Making a different difference: Physical education teacher education