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Nkechi Offor, Peace Ossom Williamson and Priscila Caçola

Purpose:

The purpose of this systematic literature review and meta-analysis is to identify the types of interventions in physical therapy contexts that have been explored in children with developmental coordination disorder, the most common variables being addressed, and whether these interventions are effective.

Method:

This systematic search of MEDLINE, PEDro, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, PsycINFO, and Cochrane Library identified interventions in physical therapy contexts for children and adolescents with DCD, and studies were screened using these criteria and assessed using the PEDro and NIH quality assessment scales. AMSTAR was used to evaluate systematic reviews and a meta-analysis was conducted.

Results:

From the articles reviewed, 29 articles of moderate to good quality were included in the qualitative analysis. Task-oriented approaches as well as motor skill training–based interventions have shown beneficial effects in improving motor function in children with DCD. Data from 14 articles was extracted for inclusion in the meta-analysis, providing support for the effectiveness of physical therapy interventions against inaction.

Conclusion:

Researchers recommend the use of task-oriented and traditional physical therapy interventions for children with DCD. In addition, interventions in physical therapy contexts need clear goals and outcome measures for individual children.

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Corbin A. Hedt, S. Brett Holland, Bradley S. Lambert, Joshua D. Harris and Patrick C. McCulloch

(RTS). Although the differences among specific specialties within physical therapy have not been studied, one can expect a sports physical therapist to be well versed on the protocols and current research in sport. For instance, the RTS phase for any rehabilitating athlete is often considered the most

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Ian J. Dempsey, Grant E. Norte, Matthew Hall, John Goetschius, Lindsay V. Slater, Jourdan M. Cancienne, Brian C. Werner, David R. Diduch and Joseph M. Hart

. Others 21 have evaluated long-term outcomes in patients who completed a formal supervised physical therapy (PT) rehabilitation program compared with a home-based program, reporting equivalent improvements in self-reported quality of life. The timing of rehabilitation has been investigated, supporting

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Jesse C. Christensen, Caitlin J. Miller, Ryan D. Burns and Hugh S. West

ensuring affordable health care, physical therapy (PT) is being critically evaluated in terms of its effectiveness in the outpatient setting. 3 A systematic review 3 concluded that a more supervised PT program in healthy patients with minimal comorbidities is equivalent to an unsupervised program

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Mohamed Kohia, John Brackle, Kenny Byrd, Amanda Jennings, William Murray and Erin Wilfong

Objective:

To analyze research literature that has examined the effectiveness of various physical therapy interventions on lateral epicondylitis.

Data Sources:

Evidence was compiled with data located using the PubMed, EBSCO, The Cochrane Library, and the Hooked on Evidence databases from 1994 to 2006 using the key words lateral epicondylitis, tennis elbow, modalities, intervention, management of, treatment for, radiohumeral bursitis, and experiment.

Study Selection:

The literature used included peer-reviewed studies that evaluated the effectiveness of physical therapy treatments on lateral epicondylitis. Future research is needed to provide a better understanding of beneficial treatment options for people living with this condition.

Data Synthesis:

Shockwave therapy and Cyriax therapy protocol are effective physical therapy interventions.

Conclusions:

There are numerous treatments for lateral epicondylitis and no single intervention has been proven to be the most efficient. Therefore, future research is needed to provide a better understanding of beneficial treatment options for people living with this condition.

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Robert C. Manske and George J. Davies

Context:

Most patients on an index concentric isokinetic test of the shoulder internal and external rotators have significant torque-acceleration-energy (TAE) deficits.

Objective:

To assess the effectiveness of rehabilitation on muscle power in patients with shoulder dysfunctions.

Design:

Prospective, pretest–posttest.

Setting:

Physical therapy clinic.

Participants:

67, mean age 28.7 ± 12.89 years.

Main Outcome Measures:

Concentric shoulder internal and external rotators measured with arm at 90° of abduction, 90° of elbow flexion. Isokinetic velocities tested: 60°, 180°, and 300°/s.

Results:

A paired t test (P < .05) compared the differences from index to discharge test for involved and uninvolved internal and external shoulder rotators. Percentages of TAE deficits involved vs uninvolved on discharge and change in TAE from index to discharge were also analyzed. Significant improvement of the involved shoulder for all velocities for both internal and external rotators was seen. The uninvolved extremity saw statistically significant improvements at all velocities for external rotators yet only at 300°/s for internal rotators. Involved-extremity TAE deficits returned to within 10% on discharge.

Conclusions:

The study demonstrated improved muscle power as measured by TAE in shoulder internal and external rotators in a sample of patients treated in an outpatient clinic.

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Tania Pizzari, Nicholas F. Taylor, Helen McBurney and Julian A. Feller

Objective:

To investigate the relationship between adherence to rehabilitation and outcome after reconstructive surgery of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL).

Design:

A prospective cohort study with adherence to rehabilitation evaluated over 8 weeks correlated with outcomes at 9 and 12 months postsurgery.

Participants:

68 patients who had undergone ACL-reconstructive surgery.

Main Outcome Measures:

Adherence was measured to and during appointments and by a self-report diary of home exercise. Outcomes were measured by 6 knee-function scales and 2 hop tests.

Results:

There was a significant relationship between home-exercise adherence and many outcomes for participants under 30 years of age (r s = .33-.44). For participants age 30 and over there was a negative relationship between home-exercise adherence and outcome. There were no significant relationships between adherence to and during physical therapy appointments and outcome after ACL-reconstructive surgery.

Conclusion:

Participants under 30 years of age who adhered to their home-exercise regimen had better functional outcome, whereas adherent participants age 30 and over experienced worse outcome with better home-exercise adherence.

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E. Paul Zehr

Edited by Richard Nichols

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Mohamed Abdelmegeed, Everett Lohman, Noha Daher, June Kume and Hasan M. Syed

investigate the effect of orthotics and strengthening exercises on subjects with ulnar wrist pain. The Institutional Review Board of Loma Linda University approved the study prior to the recruitment of subjects. The study was conducted between March 2014 and February 2015 at the physical therapy research