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Daniel Umpierre, Christianne Coelho-Ravagnani, Maria Cecília Tenório, Douglas Roque Andrade, Roseanne Autran, Mauro Virgilio Gomes de Barros, Tânia R. Bertoldo Benedetti, Fabiana Vieira Santos Azevedo Cavalcante, Edilson Serpeloni Cyrino, Samuel Carvalho Dumith, Alex Antonio Florindo, Leandro Martin Totaro Garcia, Sofia Wolker Manta, Grégore Iven Mielke, Raphael Mendes Ritti-Dias, Lorena Lima Magalhães, Paula Fabricio Sandreschi, Juliana Rezende Melo da Silva, Kelly Samara da Silva, Fernando Carlos Vinholes Siqueira, Pedro Curi Hallal, and on behalf of the Brazilian Physical Activity Guidelines Working Group*

tackle the pandemic of physical activity, WHO advises countries to develop and implement national physical activity guidelines, policies, and programs for individuals of all ages and abilities to become active. In Brazil, the National Health Promotion Policy constitutes the primary guidelines for

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Maria Cecília Marinho Tenório, Christianne Coelho-Ravagnani, Daniel Umpierre, Douglas Roque Andrade, Roseanne Autran, Mauro Virgilio Gomes de Barros, Tânia R. Bertoldo Benedetti, Fabiana Vieira Santos Azevedo Cavalcante, Edilson Serpeloni Cyrino, Samuel Carvalho Dumith, Alex Antonio Florindo, Leandro Martin Totaro Garcia, Grégore Iven Mielke, Raphael Mendes Ritti-Dias, Lorena Lima Magalhães, Paula Fabricio Sandreschi, Sofia Wolker Manta, Juliana Rezende Melo da Silva, Kelly Samara da Silva, Fernando Carlos Vinholes Siqueira, Pedro Curi Hallal, and on behalf of the Brazilian Physical Activity Guidelines Working Group*

, public health practitioners, health care personnel, and policy makers), could encourage the Brazilian population to continue to be active or to become active. The aim of this manuscript was to outline the process and methods used to develop the recently released Physical Activity Guidelines for the

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Catrine Tudor-Locke and Elroy J. Aguiar

coordinated effort from the U.S. government ( Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee, 2018 ; Pate et al., 1995 ; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2008 ), as well as several leading professional organizations ( American Heart Association, 1992 ; Colberg et al., 2016 ; Garber et

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Katrina L. Piercy, Frances Bevington, Alison Vaux-Bjerke, Sandra Williams Hilfiker, Sean Arayasirikul, and Elizabeth Y. Barnett

The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (the guidelines) outlines recommendations for the amount and types of physical activity necessary for good health based on the current scientific evidence. It includes specific physical activity dosages for youth and adults and additional

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Kenneth E. Powell, Abby C. King, David M. Buchner, Wayne W. Campbell, Loretta DiPietro, Kirk I. Erickson, Charles H. Hillman, John M. Jakicic, Kathleen F. Janz, Peter T. Katzmarzyk, William E. Kraus, Richard F. Macko, David X. Marquez, Anne McTiernan, Russell R. Pate, Linda S. Pescatello, and Melicia C. Whitt-Glover

Services convened the 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee (PAGAC) to review and summarize the current scientific evidence regarding the relationship between physical activity and health. The committee’s report serves as the basis for the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans , 2nd

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Andrea Torres, Bethany Tennant, Isabela Ribeiro-Lucas, Alison Vaux-Bjerke, Katrina Piercy, and Bonny Bloodgood

Physical activity is a leading modifiable risk factor for chronic diseases 1 , 2 that are major drivers of morbidity, disability, and health care costs in the United States. 2 The US Department of Health and Human Services released the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (guidelines

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Eric T. Hyde, John D. Omura, Kathleen B. Watson, Janet E. Fulton, and Susan A. Carlson

Engaging in regular physical activity is one of the most important things people of all ages can do to improve their health. 1 , 2 In 2008, the US Department of Health and Human Services released the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (Guidelines) , which contain separate physical

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James F. Sallis and Kevin Patrick

The International Consensus Conference on Physical Activity Guidelines for Adolescents convened to review the effects of physical activity on the health of adolescents, to establish age-appropriate physical activity guidelines, and to consider how these guidelines might be implemented in primary health care settings. Thirty-four invited experts and representatives of scientific, medical, and governmental organizations established two main guidelines. First, all adolescents should be physically active daily or nearly every day as part of their lifestyles. Second, adolescents should engage in three or more sessions per week of activities that last 20 min or more and that require moderate to vigorous levels of exertion. Available data suggest that the vast majority of U.S. adolescents meet the first guideline, but only about two thirds of boys and one half of girls meet the second guideline. Physical activity has important effects on the health of adolescents, and the promotion of regular physical activity should be a priority for physicians and other health professionals.

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Malorie Polster, Erin E. Dooley, Kate Olscamp, Katrina L. Piercy, and April Oh

Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (Guidelines), 2nd edition, released in 2018, recommends that adults get a mix of aerobic and muscle strengthening physical activity each week. 1 To attain the most health benefits from physical activity, adults need at least 150 to 300 minutes of moderate

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Frances Bevington, Katrina L. Piercy, Kate Olscamp, Sandra W. Hilfiker, Dena G. Fisher, and Elizabeth Y. Barnett

change. 3 , 4 Further, as the 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee concluded in its Scientific Report, “Strong evidence shows that behavior change theories and techniques are effective for increasing physical activity levels.” 3 In an effort to increase the number of Americans working