Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 219 items for :

  • "physiotherapists" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Alana Ninedek and Gregory S. Kelt

Context:

Recent literature has focused on the role of physiotherapists in addressing psychological sequelae of sport injury and rehabilitation.

Objective:

The study investigated sports physiotherapists' views of psychological characteristics that distinguished athletes who cope well with injury from those who cope poorly. Physiotherapists' opinions on the role of psychological skills in rehabilitation were also examined.

Design:

A questionnaire-based study.

Participants:

Participants were 150 physiotherapists who had completed, or were completing, a postgraduate sports physiotherapy program.

Main Outcome Measures:

The test instrument used was the Sports Physiotherapists' Views on Psychological Strategies questionnaire (adapted from Wiese et al1).

Results:

The physiotherapists reported communication skills, a positive attitude, intrinsic motivation, and realistic goal setting as important aspects of effective rehabilitation.

Conclusions:

The findings are discussed in relation to physiotherapists' roles in addressing basic psychological aspects of injury.

Restricted access

Claudia Meyer, Susan Williams, Frances Batchelor and Keith Hill

Introduction:

The aim was to identify barriers and opportunities facing community health physiotherapists in delivering a home-based balance exercise program to address mild balance dysfunction and, secondly, to understand the perspectives of older people in adopting this program.

Method:

Focus groups, written surveys, and data recording sheets were used with nine older people and five physiotherapists. Focus groups were audio taped, transcribed, and coded independently by two researchers.

Results:

Thematic content analysis was undertaken. Emerging themes were: engaging in preventive health (various benefits, enhancing independence); adoption of strategies (acceptable design and implementation feasibility); exercising in context (convenience, practicality, and safety); and broader implementation issues (program design, proactive health messages, and a solid evidence base).

Conclusion:

The views of older people and physiotherapists were sought to understand the adoption of a previously successful home-based program for mild balance dysfunction. Understanding the unique context and circumstances for individuals and organizations will enhance adoption.

Restricted access

Ailsa Niven

Context:

Athlete’s adherence behavior can influence the outcome of a rehabilitation program.

Objective:

To draw on sport physiotherapists’ expert knowledge to increase understanding of adherence issues in practice and identify factors that influence adherence and strategies that can be used to enhance adherence.

Design:

An interview design with inductive content analysis.

Participants:

Nine (6 women and 3 men) experienced sports physiotherapists.

Results:

Under-adherence and over-adherence were issues in practice for some practitioners, and adherence was viewed as important for successful recovery from injury. Three higher order themes emerged relating to the influence of athlete characteristics, situational characteristics, and characteristics of the injury and rehabilitation on both facilitating and preventing rehabilitation adherence. Strategies to improve adherence in practice emerged from the data and broadly addressed the key determinants of adherence.

Conclusion:

Adherence to rehabilitation is influenced by a number of factors and strategies to enhance adherence are identified.

Restricted access

Monna Arvinen-Barrow, Brian Hemmings, Caryl A. Becker and Lynn Booth

To gain an insight to the existing suggestions and recommendations on chartered physiotherapists’ preferred methods of delivery for further training in sport psychology.

Restricted access

Monna Arvinen-Barrow, Brian Hemmings, Daniel Weigand, Caryl Becker and Lynn Booth

Objective:

To assess, on a national level, the views of chartered physiotherapists with regard to the psychological content of physiotherapy practice.

Design:

A postal survey to a national list of sport injury and physiotherapy clinics was employed.

Participants:

A total of 361 responses were included in the descriptive statistical and qualitative analyses.

Measurements:

The Physiotherapist and Sport Psychology Questionnaire (PSPQ).

Results:

On average, physiotherapists felt that athletes were psychologically affected 83% of the time when injured. Key psychological characteristics were also identified in athletes who cope/do not cope successfully with their injuries. Physiotherapists reported using psychological techniques in their work and expressed the need for further training in the field. Only 24.1% of the physiotherapists stated having accesses to accredited sport psychologists.

Conclusions:

Results suggest that UK physiotherapists possess practical experiences and good awareness for psychological aspects of injuries and acknowledge the importance of treating a range of psychological conditions.

Restricted access

Jeroen de Bruijn, Henk van der Worp, Mark Korte, Astrid de Vries, Rick Nijland and Michel Brink

strength and balance exercises under personal supervision of the physiotherapist. Moving forward through the process, rehabilitation tends to gradually get more specific and the clinical setting is often traded for a sport-specific setting. The emphasis during the last phase of rehabilitation is on

Restricted access

Margarita D. Tsiros, Emily J. Ward, Sophie Lefmann and Susan Hillier

). Furthermore, clinical assessment is still needed (e.g., by a physiotherapist, occupational therapist, etc.), especially for children with coexisting developmental problems that may be missed by questionnaires, and who are likely to require multidisciplinary assessment/referrals ( Green et al., 2005

Restricted access

Andy Marshall, Maggie Donovan-Hall and Steve Ryall

Objective:

To explore athletes’ perceptions of the factors that they feel may affect their adherence to a physiotherapy intervention.

Design:

A qualitative design using semistructured interviews.

Setting:

Participants were interviewed at home or their athletic club.

Participants:

8 participants, 5 men and 3 women with a mean age of 30.4 y.

Results:

Thematic analysis revealed 2 main categories of themes. The first relates to the athlete’s perceptions of factors affecting his or her own adherence, with themes including the impact of injury, justification of adherence, and strategies used by the patient. The second relates to perceptions of the physiotherapist’s impact on adherence, with themes relating to characteristics of and strategies used by the physiotherapist.

Conclusions:

Findings demonstrate the importance of exploring patients’ perceptions of adherence. A number of factors that affect adherence are identified, and strategies that may enhance adherence suggested.

Restricted access

Samuele Contemori, Andrea Biscarini, Fabio M. Botti, Daniele Busti, Roberto Panichi and Vito E. Pettorossi

joint, and predispose it to acute or overuse injuries. Therefore, this study may be helpful for athletic trainers and physical/physiotherapists to prevent shoulder injuries and to create specific proprioceptive and neuromuscular training programs for athletes with IIMA. References 1. Escamilla RF

Restricted access

Pia Thomeé, Peter Währborg, Mats Börjesson, Roland Thomeé, Bengt I. Eriksson and Jon Karlsson

Context:

The Knee Self-Efficacy Scale (K-SES) has good reliability, validity, and responsiveness for patients’ perceived knee-function self-efficacy during rehabilitation after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Preoperative knee-function self-efficacy has also been shown to have a predictive ability in terms of outcome 1 y after ACL reconstruction.

Objective:

To evaluate a new clinical rehabilitation model containing strategies to enhance knee-function self-efficacy.

Design:

A randomized, controlled study.

Setting:

Rehabilitation clinic and laboratory.

Patients:

40 patients with ACL injuries.

Intervention:

All patients followed a standardized rehabilitation protocol. Patients in the experimental group were treated by 1 of 3 physiotherapists who had received specific training in a clinical rehabilitation model. These physiotherapists were also given their patients’ self-efficacy scores after the initial and 4-, 6-, and 12-mo follow-ups, whereas the 5 physiotherapists treating the patients in the control group were not given their patients’ self-efficacy scores.

Main Outcome Measures:

The K-SES, the Tegner Activity Scale, the Physical Activity Scale, the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, and the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control.

Results:

Twenty-four patients (12 in each group) completed all followups. Current knee-function self-efficacy, knee symptoms in sports, and knee quality of life improved significantly (P = .05) in both groups during rehabilitation. Both groups had a significantly (P = .05) lower physical activity level at 12 mo than preinjury. No significant differences were found between groups.

Conclusion:

In this study there was no evidence that the clinical rehabilitation model with strategies to enhance self-efficacy resulted in a better outcome than the rehabilitation protocol used for the control group.