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Adesola C. Odole, Olawale T. Agbomeji, Ogochukwu K.K. Onyeso, Joshua O. Ojo, and Nse A. Odunaiya

very familiar with physiotherapists, and their services as physiotherapists are usually attached to sport teams, with other members of the health care team. In such settings, athletes’ knowledge and perceptions toward physiotherapy services have an impact on their general attitude toward these services

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Margarita D. Tsiros, Emily J. Ward, Sophie Lefmann, and Susan Hillier

service for children with possible motor skill difficulties. Hence, the aim of this study was to describe the physiotherapy in preschools (PIPS) program and undertake an initial evaluation to see if the program was a feasible and sustainable option to assist children with possible motor skill difficulties

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Andy Marshall, Maggie Donovan-Hall, and Steve Ryall

Objective:

To explore athletes’ perceptions of the factors that they feel may affect their adherence to a physiotherapy intervention.

Design:

A qualitative design using semistructured interviews.

Setting:

Participants were interviewed at home or their athletic club.

Participants:

8 participants, 5 men and 3 women with a mean age of 30.4 y.

Results:

Thematic analysis revealed 2 main categories of themes. The first relates to the athlete’s perceptions of factors affecting his or her own adherence, with themes including the impact of injury, justification of adherence, and strategies used by the patient. The second relates to perceptions of the physiotherapist’s impact on adherence, with themes relating to characteristics of and strategies used by the physiotherapist.

Conclusions:

Findings demonstrate the importance of exploring patients’ perceptions of adherence. A number of factors that affect adherence are identified, and strategies that may enhance adherence suggested.

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Daniel L. Borges, Mayara Gabrielle Silva, Luan Nascimento Silva, João Vyctor Fortes, Erika Thalita Costa, Rebeca Pessoa Assunção, Carlos Magno Lima, Vinícius José da Silva Nina, Mário Bernardo-Filho, and Danúbia Sá Caputo

Background:

Physical activity is beneficial in several clinical situations and recommended for patients with ischemic heart disease, as well as for those undergoing cardiac surgery.

Methods:

In a randomized controlled trial, 34 patients underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. A randomized control group (n = 15) submitted to conventional physiotherapy. The intervention group (n = 19) received the same protocol plus additional aerobic exercise with cycle ergometer. Pulmonary function by spirometry, respiratory muscle strength by manovacuometry, and functional capacity through 6-minute walking test was assessed before surgery and at hospital discharge.

Results:

There was significant reduction in pulmonary function in both groups. In both groups, inspiratory muscle strength was maintained while expiratory muscle strength significantly decreased. Functional capacity was maintained in the intervention group (364.5 [324.5 to 428] vs. 348 [300.7 to 413.7] meters, P = .06), but it decreased significantly in control group patients (320 [288.5 to 393.0] vs. 292 [237.0 to 336.0] meters, P = .01). A significant difference in functional capacity was also found in intergroup analyses at hospital discharge (P = .03).

Conclusion:

Aerobic exercise applied early on coronary artery bypass grafting patients may promote maintenance of functional capacity, with no impact on pulmonary function and respiratory muscle strength when compared with conventional physiotherapy.

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Noureddin Nakhostin Ansari, Soofia Naghdi, Hadi Karimi-Zarchi, Zahra Fakhari, and Scott Hasson

Context:

Whole-body vibration (WBV) is a type of weight-bearing exercise used in the field of sport and rehabilitation. There is no study on the effects of WBV on muscle recovery after a fatiguing activity.

Objective:

To determine the effects of a single WBV session on lower-extremity fatigue.

Design:

Randomized controlled pilot study.

Setting:

University Physiotherapy Clinic.

Subjects:

A total of 13 healthy young men volunteered to participate in this study. Subjects were randomly assigned into the WBV group (n = 7, mean age: 21 y) or control group (CG; n = 6, mean age: 20 y).

Intervention:

Subjects in the WBV group participated in a single-session WBV (30 Hz, amplitude 4 mm, 2 min) after lower-extremity fatigue.

Main Outcome Measures:

Peak force of quadriceps muscle, single leg hop test, and Y-test were measured before inducing muscle fatigue (T0), immediately after completing the fatigue protocol (T1), after WBV (T2), and 15 min following the application of WBV (T3). The same method was applied in the CG while the WBV machine was turned off.

Results:

Repeated-measure ANOVA revealed no significant differences between groups in any of the outcomes.

Conclusions:

The findings indicated that WBV was not effective in the recovery of lower-extremity fatigue in healthy young men.

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Andrea Kay Bailey, Claire Minshull, James Richardson, and Nigel P. Gleeson

Context:

Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) aims to restore hyaline cartilage. Traditionally, ACI rehabilitation is prescribed in a concurrent (CON) format. However, it is well known from studies in asymptomatic populations that CON training produces an interference effect that can attenuate strength gains. Strength is integral to joint function, so adopting a nonconcurrent (N-CON) approach to ACI rehabilitation might improve outcomes.

Objective:

To assess changes in function and neuromuscular performance during 48 wk of CON and N-CON physical rehabilitation after ACI to the knee.

Setting:

Orthopedic Hospital NHS Foundation Trust.

Design:

Randomized control, pilot study.

Participants:

11 patients (9 male, 2 female; age 32.3 ± 6.6 y; body mass 79.3 ±10.4 kg; time from injury to surgery 7.1 ± 4.9 mo [mean ± SD]) randomly allocated to N-CON:CON (2:1).

Interventions:

Standardized CON and N-CON physiotherapy that involved separation of strength and cardiovascular-endurance conditioning.

Main Outcome Measures:

Function in the single-leg-hop test, patient-reported outcomes (Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score [KOOS], International Knee Documentation Committee subjective questionnaire [IKDC]), and neuromuscular outcomes of peak force (PF), rate of force development (RFD), electromechanical delay (EMD), and sensorimotor performance (force error [FE]) of the knee extensors and flexors of the injured and noninjured legs, measured presurgery and at 6, 12, 24, and 48 wk postsurgery.

Results:

Factorial ANOVAs with repeated measures of group by leg and by test occasion revealed significantly superior improvements for KOOS, IKDC, PF, EMD, and FE associated with N-CON vs CON rehabilitation (F 1.5, 13.4 GG = 3.7−4.7, P < .05). These results confirm increased peak effectiveness of N-CON rehabilitation (~4.5−13.3% better than CON over 48 wk of rehabilitation). N-CON and CON showed similar patterns of improvement for single-leg-hop test and RFD.

Conclusions:

Nonconcurrent strength and cardiovascular-endurance conditioning during 48 wk of rehabilitation after ACI surgery elicited significantly greater improvements to functional and neuromuscular outcomes than did contemporary concurrent rehabilitation.

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Eleftherios Paraskevopoulos, Georgios Gioftsos, Georgios Georgoudis, and Maria Papandreou

( Strean, 1998 ). Thus, conducting a study using a qualitative approach in this population would help researchers to investigate and understand PVA experiences and perceptions from physiotherapy treatment that include possible barriers to and facilitators of ERA both in the short and longer term. Moreover

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Amanda L. Ager, Dorien Borms, Magali Bernaert, Vicky Brusselle, Mazarine Claessens, Jean-Sébastien Roy, and Ann Cools

cord injuries, nerve, or plexus injuries) Connective tissue disorders (Ehlers–Danlos syndrome and Marfan syndrome) Systematic disorders (diabetes, lupus, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, and chronic fatigue syndrome) Healthy population Intervention Physiotherapy/conservative rehabilitation

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Natalia Romero-Franco, Juan Antonio Montaño-Munuera, Juan Carlos Fernández-Domínguez, and Pedro Jiménez-Reyes

-analysis . Physiotherapy . 2014 ; 100 ( 3 ): 187 – 195 . PubMed ID: 24690442 doi:10.1016/j.physio.2013.11.002 10.1016/j.physio.2013.11.002 24690442 5. Romero-Franco N , Martnez-López EJ , Hita-Contreras F , Lomas-Vega R , Martnez-Amat A . Short-term effects of anaerobic lactic exercise on knee

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Georde Vuillermin, Kelly-Ann Bowles, Ross Iles, and Cylie Williams

hospital, subacute hospital, and community health). All persons employed across allied health (∼n = 650) were eligible to participate. Allied health were considered by the health service to encompass the following professions: physiotherapy, podiatry, speech pathology, occupational therapy, social work