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Jennifer K. Sansom and Beverly D. Ulrich

affects energy efficiency in children with MMC. Most research studies examining energy expenditure during use of the set of ADs we tested here (i.e., walker, crutches, poles) have involved individuals who had extensive practice using the AD prior to testing. For this pilot study, we wanted to know how

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Jennifer L. Etnier, William B. Karper, Jennifer I. Gapin, Lisa A. Barella, Yu Kai Chang and Karen J. Murphy

Background:

This pilot study was designed to test the efficacy of a physical activity program for improving psychological variables and fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) symptoms and to provide preliminary evidence regarding the effects on perceived cognitive symptoms and objectively measured cognitive performance by FMS patients.

Methods:

Sixteen women diagnosed with FMS were randomly assigned to an 18-week physical activity program or to a control condition. Psychological measures, FMS symptoms, perceived cognitive function, objective measures of cognition, and walking capacity were assessed at baseline and post-test.

Results:

At posttest, there were significant differences in fatigue (effect size, ES = 1.86), depression (ES = 1.27), FMS symptoms (ES = 1.56), self-reported cognitive symptoms (ES = 1.19), and delayed recall performance (ES = 1.16) between the physically active group and the control group, indicating that the FMS patients benefited from physical activity. Beneficial effects were also observed for 6 of the 7 objective measures of cognition and ranged from small to large (ESs = 0.26 to 1.06).

Conclusions:

Given that all FMS patients do not respond well to conventional treatments, these beneficial effects of physical activity are important. Future studies with larger samples are warranted to test the reliability of the findings for the objective measures of cognition.

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Christine W. St. Laurent, Brittany Masteller and John Sirard

can be easily tailored to each individual and may activate greater core and stabilizing musculature. However, no prior studies have examined the efficacy of suspension training in children. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the efficacy of a 6-week movement program mainly based in

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Noureddin Nakhostin Ansari, Parisa Alaei, Soofia Naghdi, Zahra Fakhari, Shiva Komesh and Jan Dommerholt

with atraumatic knee pain. 27 The purpose of this preliminary study was to determine if a single session of DN would improve hamstring flexibility in healthy subjects with shortened hamstrings. Methods Study Design This pilot study, conducted in the physiotherapy clinic of Tehran University of Medical

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Raviraj Nataraj, Musa L. Audu, Robert F. Kirsch and Ronald J. Triolo

This pilot study investigated the potential of using trunk acceleration feedback control of center of pressure (COP) against postural disturbances with a standing neuroprosthesis following paralysis. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) were trained to use three-dimensional trunk acceleration as input to predict changes in COP for able-bodied subjects undergoing perturbations during bipedal stance. Correlation coefficients between ANN predictions and actual COP ranged from 0.67 to 0.77. An ANN trained across all subject-normalized data was used to drive feedback control of ankle muscle excitation levels for a computer model representing a standing neuroprosthesis user. Feedback control reduced average upper-body loading during perturbation onset and recovery by 42% and peak loading fby 29% compared with optimal, constant excitation.

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Edgar R. Vieira, Ruth Tappen, Sareen S. Gropper, Maria T. Severi, Gabriella Engstrom, Marcio R. de Oliveira, Alexandre C. Barbosa and Rubens A. da Silva

simulations combined with knee flexion and dorsiflexion strength may be sensitive to capture adaptations as a result of exercise programs. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility of delivering an OEP-based group exercise program to a sample of older Caribbean Americans, and to assess

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Karim Korchi, Frédéric Noé, Noëlle Bru and Thierry Paillard

in older adults. Consequently, this pilot study was undertaken to explore the feasibility and effects of increased somatosensory information from the foot by exercising barefoot on balance, gait, and plantar cutaneous sensitivity in institutionalized older adults involved in multimodal exercise

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V. Marie Fox, Valorie A. Lawlor and Marvin W. Luttges

A novel test instrument was designed to objectively quantify the progress of persons who participated in therapeutic horseback riding programs. Nineteen handicapped children, ages 7 to 14 years, with heterogeneous impairments were evaluated before and after riding. For measures of sitting balance and coordination, and hand, hip, knee, and ankle strength, marked improvements were noted for most children. Clinical impressions of therapists and parents suggested concomitant progress in characteristics such as self-confidence and interaction with others. Results from this pilot study appeared to support the use of the apparatus in that field setting.

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Marie-Louise Bird, Cecilia Shing, Casey Mainsbridge, Dean Cooley and Scott Pedersen

Background:

Sedentary behavior is related to metabolic syndrome and might have implications for the long-term health of workers in a low activity environment. The primary aim of this pilot study was to determine activity levels of adults working at a University during work hours. A secondary aim was to determine the relationship between actual and perceived activity levels.

Methods:

Activity levels of university staff (n = 15, male = 7, age = 53 ± 7 years, BMI = 26.5 ± 2.5kg·m2) were monitored over 5 consecutive workdays using SenseWear accelerometers, then participants completed a questionnaire of their perception of workplace sedentary time.

Results:

Each participant spent 71.5 ± 13.1% (358 ± 78 min) of their workday being sedentary (< 1.5 METs), 15.6 ± 9.0% involved in light activity (1.5–3 METs), 11.7 ± 10.0% in moderate activity (3–5 METs), and 1.1 ± 1.3% in vigorous activity (> 5 METs) (P < .0001). The mean difference between actual (SenseWear < 1.5 METs) and perceived sitting time was –2 ± 32%; however, perceived sedentary time was reported with a range of under-to-over estimation of –75% to 51%.

Conclusion:

This pilot study identifies long periods of low metabolic activity during the workday and poor perception of individual sedentary time. Interventions to reduce sedentary time in the workplace may be necessary to ensure that the work environment does not adversely affect long-term health.

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Erik A. Wikstrom and Robert B. Anderson

The purpose of this investigation was to determine if stereotypical patterns of gait initiation are altered in those with posttraumatic ankle osteoarthritis. Ten subjects, five with unilateral ankle osteoarthritis and five uninjured controls, participated. Subjects completed the SF-36 and Ankle Osteoarthritis Scale to quantify self-reported disability as well as 10 dual-limb static stance trials and 10 gait initiation trials with each leg. Center of pressure outcomes were calculated for static balance trials while the peak center of pressure excursions were calculated for each phase of gait initiation. The results indicate greater self-reported disability (P < .05) and worse static postural control (P < .05) in the ankle osteoarthritis group. Nonstereotypical patterns were also observed during the first and third phases of gait initiation in those with ankle osteoarthritis. The results of this pilot study suggest that supraspinal motor control mechanisms may have changed in those with posttraumatic ankle osteoarthritis.