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Hans Erik Næss

As commercial actors in the Formula 1 world championship have become political influencers in countries hosting F1 Grand Prix (races) the Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA), like other Global Sporting Governing Bodies (GSGBs) 1 such as the International Federation of Football

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Erin E. Redihan

Given the recent geopolitical implications attached to the 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympics, there are times when it seems as though politics should be a medal event at the Games. The politics surrounding the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi offer another recent example where the bureaucratic moguls

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Edward M. Kian

In 2013–14, Jason Collins and Michael Sam became the first 2 athletes from the 4 most popular professional leagues in the United States to publicly come out as gay during their playing careers. U.S. men’s pro team sports have historically been arenas where hegemonic masculinity flourishes and open homosexuality is nearly nonexistent. However, these athletes came out during a period when sexual minorities had won numerous civil rights and were gaining acceptance by a majority of Americans, particularly those who self-identify as politically liberal. A textual analysis examined framing of Collins’s and Sam’s coming out in articles published on the liberal political Web site MSNBC.com. Focus was placed on how these athletes, homosexuality, and masculinity were framed in the corresponding message-board comments posted in response to these articles. Five primary themes emerged from the data, showing that acceptable forms of masculinities and homosexuality in sport remain contested terrains, even on liberal message boards.

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Justin Leifso

legislative majorities. Wall’s popularity, however, was nothing new. For much of his tenure, Wall occupied the position of Canada’s most popular premier and the subject of speculation surrounding possible national political aspirations (e.g.,  Maclean’s, 2016 ). I argue that Wall’s popularity from his

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Trygve B. Broch and Eivind Å. Skille

This article highlights legitimacy as contingent upon actors’ ongoing maneuvering of meaning structures. Cultural sociology allows an alternative perspective on power struggles in modernity ( Alexander, 2011 , 2017 ) by centering our attention on the performance aspects of sport politics. We show

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Dan Goodley

condition: the biopsychological, the biopolitical, and, what I term, an in-between-all politics. It is my view that disability categories intervene in the world in some complex and often contradictory ways. It is up to us to work out how we live with these contradictions. The Biopsychological Let me start

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Steve Booth Marston

article addresses the racial politics of sport management through a discourse study of NBA gameplay governance. I focus on the 1990–2006 period, during which officials instituted a series of policies that narrowed permissible bodily contact and increased penalties for violations. The rule changes occurred

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Kyoung-yim Kim and Heejoon Chung

Scholarly debate is divided when it comes to sport mega-events like the Olympics. One camp argues that they open up a unique political opportunity for actors to exercise power in pursuit of their goals (e.g., Cottrell & Nelson, 2010 ). The other argues that these mega-events empower the state to

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Moss E. Norman, Michael Hart and LeAnne Petherick

Cultural genocide is the destruction of those structures and practices that allow the group to continue as a group. States that engage in cultural genocide set out to destroy the political and social institutions of the targeted groups, land is seized, and populations are forcibly transferred and

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M. Ann Hall and Bruce Kidd

Eva Dawes Spinks (1912–2009) was an outstanding Canadian high jumper in the 1930s. The present paper traces her early life, successful athletic career, and her decision in 1935 to join a group of athletes on a goodwill tour of the Soviet Union organized by the Workers’ Sports Association of Canada. Upon her return, Dawes was suspended by the Women’s Amateur Athletic Union of Canada. She retired from competition and became involved in the Canadian campaign to boycott the 1936 Berlin Olympics. Much later, Dawes adamantly denied any political involvement. The purpose of this paper is to examine and possibly explain the incongruity between the historical evidence and Dawes’s later denials. More broadly, it is a discussion about the relationship between history and individual memory.