Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 18 items for :

  • "population surveillance" x
Clear All
Restricted access

MeLisa Creamer, Heather R. Bowles, Belinda von Hofe, Kelley Pettee Gabriel, Harold W. Kohl III and Adrian Bauman

Background:

Computer-assisted techniques may be a useful way to enhance physical activity surveillance and increase accuracy of reported behaviors.

Purpose:

Evaluate the reliability and validity of a physical activity (PA) self-report instrument administered by telephone and internet.

Methods:

The telephone-administered Active Australia Survey was adapted into 2 forms for internet self-administration: survey questions only (internet-text) and with videos demonstrating intensity (internet-video). Data were collected from 158 adults (20–69 years, 61% female) assigned to telephone (telephone-interview) (n = 56), internet-text (n = 51), or internet-video (n = 51). Participants wore an accelerometer and completed a logbook for 7 days. Test-retest reliability was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Convergent validity was assessed using Spearman correlations.

Results:

Strong test-retest reliability was observed for PA variables in the internet-text (ICC = 0.69 to 0.88), internet-video (ICC = 0.66 to 0.79), and telephone-interview (ICC = 0.69 to 0.92) groups (P-values < 0.001). For total PA, correlations (ρ) between the survey and Actigraph+logbook were ρ = 0.47 for the internet-text group, ρ = 0.57 for the internet-video group, and ρ = 0.65 for the telephone-interview group. For vigorous-intensity activity, the correlations between the survey and Actigraph+logbook were 0.52 for internet-text, 0.57 for internet-video, and 0.65 for telephone-interview (P < .05).

Conclusions:

Internet-video of the survey had similar test-retest reliability and convergent validity when compared with the telephone-interview, and should continue to be developed.

Restricted access

Stacy A. Clemes, Beverley M. David, Yi Zhao, Xu Han and Wendy Brown

Background:

In light of evidence linking sedentary behaviors to health outcomes, there have been calls for the measurement of sedentary behavior in surveillance studies. This study examined the convergent validity of 2 self-report measures of sitting time and accelerometer-determined sedentary time (minutes/day of <100 counts/minute).

Methods:

44 adults wore an ActiGraph accelerometer for 7 days, during which they also recorded daily sitting time in a diary, in response to a single-item question. After 7 days, participants completed a new domain-specific questionnaire to assess usual weekday and weekend-day sitting time. Total sitting times recorded from the self-report measures were compared with accelerometer-determined sedentary time.

Results:

Total sitting time calculated from the domain-specific questionnaire did not differ significantly from accelerometer-determined sedentary time on weekdays (mean difference [±SE] = –14 ± 28 mins/day) and weekend days (–4 ± 45 mins/day, both P > .05). Sitting time was significantly underestimated using the single-item specific-day question on weekdays (–173 ± 18 mins/day) and weekend days (–219 ± 23 mins/day, both P < .001).

Conclusions:

When assessed via self-report, the estimation of total sitting time is improved by summing sitting times reported across different domains. The continued improvement of self-report measures of sitting time will be important if we are to further our understanding of the links between sedentary behavior and health.

Restricted access

Claire L. Cleland, Sara Ferguson, Paul McCrorie, Jasper Schipperijn, Geraint Ellis and Ruth F. Hunter

potentially raise critical questions over population surveillance figures ( Aadland et al., 2018 ; Migueles et al., 2017 ; Pedisic & Bauman, 2015 ; Strath et al., 2012 ). Aims The aim of the study was to assess the impact of different accelerometer criteria (LFE, nonwear time, and cut point thresholds) on

Restricted access

Dori E. Rosenberg, Fiona C. Bull, Alison L. Marshall, James F. Sallis and Adrian E. Bauman

Purpose:

This study explored definitions of sedentary behavior and examined the relationship between sitting time and physical inactivity using the sitting items from the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ).

Methods:

Participants (N = 289, 44.6% male, mean age = 35.93) from 3 countries completed self-administered long- and short-IPAQ sitting items. Participants wore accelero-meters; were classified as inactive (no leisure-time activity), insufficiently active, or meeting recommendations; and were classified into tertiles of sitting behavior.

Results:

Reliability of sitting time was acceptable for men and women. Correlations between total sitting and accelerometer counts/min <100 were significant for both long (r = .33) and short (r = .34) forms. There was no agreement between tertiles of sitting and the inactivity category (kappa = .02, P = .68).

Conclusion:

Sedentary behavior should be explicitly measured in population surveillance and research instead of being defined by lack of physical activity.

Restricted access

Dori E. Rosenberg, Gregory J. Norman, Nicole Wagner, Kevin Patrick, Karen J. Calfas and James F. Sallis

Background:

Sedentary behavior is related to obesity, but measures of sedentary behaviors are lacking for adults. The purpose of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of the Sedentary Behavior Questionnaire (SBQ) among overweight adults.

Methods:

Participants were 49 adults for the 2 week test-retest reliability study (67% female, 53% white, mean age = 20) and 401 overweight women (mean age = 41, 61% white) and 441 overweight men (mean age = 44, 81% white) for the validity study. The SBQ consisted of reports of time spent in 9 sedentary behaviors. Outcomes for validity included accelerometer measured inactivity, sitting time (International Physical Activity Questionnaire), and BMI. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) assessed reliability and partial correlations assessed validity.

Results:

ICCs were acceptable for all items and the total scale (range = .51–.93). For men, there were significant relationships of SBQ items with IPAQ sitting time and BMI. For women, there were relationships between the SBQ and accelerometer inactivity minutes, IPAQ sitting time, and BMI.

Conclusions:

The SBQ has acceptable measurement properties for use among overweight adults. Specific measures of sedentary behavior should be included in studies and population surveillance.

Restricted access

. Bassett * Christopher R. Cherry * 8 2014 11 11 6 6 1105 1105 1110 1110 10.1123/jpah.2012-0444 Utility of Computer-Assisted Approaches for Population Surveillance of Physical Activity MeLisa Creamer * Heather R. Bowles * Belinda von Hofe * Kelley Pettee Gabriel * Harold W. Kohl III * Adrian

Open access

Juana Willumsen and Fiona Bull

health and well-being were recognized by the Commission on Ending Childhood Obesity, which called for clear guidance on physical activity, sedentary behavior, and sleep in young children. 4 By establishing such guidelines, it will be possible to conduct population surveillance of movement behaviors

Restricted access

Jordan Andre Martenstyn, Lauren Powell, Natasha Nassar, Mark Hamer and Emmanuel Stamatakis

METs) on the direction and magnitude of PA–mortality associations using an established pooled data set of population cohorts. 15 Methods Participants We used data collected from the Health Survey for England (HSE) and the Scottish Health Survey (SHS). The HSE and SHS are household-based population

Restricted access

William Bellew, Ben J. Smith, Tracy Nau, Karen Lee, Lindsey Reece and Adrian Bauman

-level programs in Australia across health and nonhealth sectors • Conduct an audit of prevalence measures used for population surveillance, and a discussion of additional measures and indicators needed for ongoing monitoring of the “PA system” • Undertake a distillation of evidence to guide current best practice

Restricted access

Pasmore Malambo, Andre P. Kengne, Estelle V. Lambert, Anniza De Villiers and Thandi Puoane

fefb 21694556 26. World Health Organization . Global Recommendations on Physical Activity for Health. Geneva, Switzerland : World Health Organization ; 2010 . 27. Hallal PC , Andersen LB , Bull FC , Guthold R , Haskell W . Physical activity levels of the world’s population