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Pedro C. Hallal, Pitágoras T. Machado, Giovâni F. Del Duca, Inácio C. Silva, Tales C. Amorim, Thiago T. Borges, Airton J. Rombaldi, Mario R. Azevedo and Alan G. Knuth

Purpose:

To evaluate the prevalence of physical activity advice, the source of the information, and the types of recommendation in a population-based sample of adults living in South Brazil.

Methods:

Population-based study including 972 adults living in Pelotas, Brazil. The outcome variable was based on the following question: “Has anyone ever recommended you to practice physical activity”? If the answer was positive, we asked who was responsible for the prescription (an open question, which was categorized later) and which recommendation was done.

Results:

The prevalence of physical activity advice was 56.2% (95% CI 52.3−60.1). Physical activity advice was mostly done by physicians (92.5%). Walking was, by far, the most frequent recommendation. Females were more likely to receive advice for physical activity practice than males (OR 1.74; 95% CI 1.30−2.31). Age, economic level, body mass index and leisure-time physical activity were positively associated with physical activity advice, while self-reported health presented an inverse association with the outcome.

Conclusions:

The prevalence of physical activity advice was high in this sample, suggesting that the Brazilian health system is incorporating physical activity in its routine.

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Nicola W. Burton, Gavin Turrell and Brian Oldenburg

Background.

This study assessed item nonresponse (INR) in a population-based mail survey of physical activity (PA).

Methods.

A questionnaire was mailed to a random sample, with a 57% response rate (n = 2532). The magnitude and type of PA INR and the association with sociodemographic variables was examined using logistic regression.

Results.

Among survey respondents, 28% had incomplete PA data; 11% missed 1 item, 11% missed 2 items, and 5% missed all 3 items. Respondents missing 3 items tended to be female, less educated, low income, in poor health, and current smokers. The walking item was missed by 8% of respondents, and 18% and 23% missed the vigorous-intensity and moderate-intensity PA items respectively. These groups were sociodemograpically different from those without INR. Incomplete PA data was also associated with sociodemographic INR.

Conclusions.

Mail surveys may underrepresent individuals insufficiently active for health, in particular those of low socioeconomic position.

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Clare Stevinson, Katia Tonkin, Valerie Capstick, Alexandra Schepansky, Aliya B. Ladha, Jeffrey K. Vallance, Wylam Faught, Helen Steed and Kerry S. Courneya

Background:

Regular physical activity is associated with quality of life and other health-related outcomes in ovarian cancer survivors, but participation rates are low. This study investigated the determinants of physical activity in ovarian cancer survivors.

Methods:

A population-based, cross-sectional, mailed survey of ovarian cancer survivors in Alberta, Canada, was conducted. Measures included self-reported physical activity, medical and demographic factors, and social-cognitive variables from the theory of planned behavior (TPB).

Results:

A total of 359 women participated (51.4% response rate), of whom 112 (31.1%) were meeting physical activity guidelines. Variables associated with meeting guidelines were younger age, higher education and income, being employed, lower body-mass index, absence of arthritis, longer time since diagnosis, earlier disease stage, and being disease free. Analysis of the TPB variables indicated that 36% of the variance in physical activity guidelines was explained, with intention being the sole independent correlate (β = .56; P < .001).

Conclusion:

Various demographic and medical factors can help identify ovarian cancer survivors at risk for physical inactivity. Interventions should attempt to increase physical activity intentions in this population by focusing on instrumental and affective attitudes, as well as perceptions of control.

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Andrea Wendt Böhm, Grégore Iven Mielke, Maurício Feijó da Cruz, Virgílio Viana Ramires and Fernando C. Wehrmeister

Background:

Physical inactivity in elderly is a public health problem. The purpose of this study is to describe and test the association between social support and leisure-time physical activity among the elderly.

Methods:

A cross-sectional, population-based study with 1,285 subjects (60+ years old) living in a city in southern Brazil was carried out in 2014. Physical activity practice was measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire [leisure domain: at least 150 minutes per week of walking + moderate physical activity + 2(vigorous physical activity)], while social support was measured using the Physical Activity Social Support Scale.

Results:

The prevalence of elderly who reached the recommendations of leisure-time physical activity was 18.4%. The elderly persons who had the company of family or friends to walk had a 2.45 times higher prevalence of reaching the recommendations of physical activity in leisure than those who did not. Those who had company of friends to practice moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were 3.23 times more likely to reach physical activity recommendations than their counterparts. The least common social support was the joint practice for walking and for MVPA.

Conclusions:

Strategies that incentivize family members and friends to provide social support to the elderly for physical activity focusing on joint practice must be encouraged.

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Marui Weber Corseuil Giehl, Pedro Curi Hallal, Claudia Weber Corseuil, Ione J. Ceola Schneider and Eleonora d’Orsi

Background:

Understanding the built environment influence on specific domains of walking is important for public health interventions to increase physical activity levels among older adults.

Purpose:

The purpose was to investigate the association between built environment characteristics and walking among older adults.

Methods:

A population-based study was performed in 80 census tracts in Florianópolis, Brazil, including 1,705 older adults (60+ years old). Walking was measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Built environment characteristics were assessed through a geographic information system. All analyses were conducted through a multilevel logistic regression.

Results:

Individuals living in neighborhoods with a higher population density (odds ratio [OR]: 2.19; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.40–3.42), with a higher street connectivity (OR: 1.85; 95% CI, 1.16–2.94), a higher sidewalk proportion (OR: 1.77; 95% CI, 1.11–2.83), and paved streets (medium tertile: OR: 1.61, 95% CI, 1.04–2.49; highest tertile: OR: 2.11; 95% CI, 1.36–3.27) were more likely to walk for transportation. Regarding walking for leisure, only 2 predictors were associated, area income (OR: 1.48; 95% CI, 1.04–2.12) and street density (OR: 1.47; 95% CI, 1.02–2.10).

Conclusions:

Improving the neighborhood built environment is an important step for achieving higher levels of walking in the elderly population in a middle-income country.

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Thiago T. Borges, Pedro C. Hallal, Inacio Crochemore Mohnsam da Silva, Grégore Iven Mielke, Airton J. Rombaldi and Fernando C. Barros

Background:

The aim of the current study was to evaluate the association between knowledge about physical activity (PA) recommendations (in terms of duration and frequency) and physical activity practice in a population-based sample of adults and adolescents.

Methods:

Crosssectional survey, conducted in Pelotas, Brazil. Participants (10+ years) were included in the sample and reported their perception about the minimum number of days and duration of PA to achieve health benefits. Those who reported PA practice ≥ 150 min/wk (adults) and ≥ 300 min/wk (adolescents) were considered active.

Results:

The sample included 1696 adults and 399 adolescents. More than one-third (38.6%) of the adult population reported that < 150 minutes of PA per week would be sufficient to obtain health benefits. Moreover, 76.1% of the adolescents reported that < 300 minutes per week were sufficient to obtain health benefits. Among adolescents, those who were active tended to report that higher amounts of PA were needed to obtain health benefits.

Conclusions:

Despite global recognition of the role of PA for improving health, knowledge about the minimum frequency and duration for achieving health benefits is still low in Brazil, particularly among adolescents.

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Dianne Neumark-Sztainer, Richard F. MacLehose, Allison W. Watts, Marla E. Eisenberg, Melissa N. Laska and Nicole Larson

reasons for engaging in yoga among overweight and nonoverweight people. The practice of yoga appears to be increasingly popular in the United States, although population-based research studies are limited and there is some variation in prevalence estimates across extant studies, probably due to

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Justin A. Haegele, Carrie J. Aigner and Sean Healy

face numerous barriers that inhibit PA participation ( Haegele & Porretta, 2015 ; Kozub & Oh, 2004 ). However, the existing literature tends to neglect ST and SLD, and population-based studies examining prevalences of meeting these health-enhancing-behavior guidelines among those with VIs are absent

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Pedro Ángel Latorre-Román, Felipe García-Pinillos and David Mora-López

Purpose:

The purpose of this study was to examine age and sex differences in standing long jump (SLJ) and to determine norm-referenced values for Spanish preschool children.

Method:

A total of 3555 children, aged 3–6 years, participated in this study (1746 girls and 1809 boys). To measure explosive leg power, the SLJ was used.

Results:

In the analysis of reliability using test-retest with 86 children (48% boys, age = 56.22 ± 10.34 months), the following descriptive results were obtained (mean, SD): at pretest = 76.53 ± 20.20 cm, at retest = 74.56 ± 21.12 cm (p = .124), and an intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.913 (95% confidence interval = 0.866–0.943). Boys exhibited a greater performance than girls at 3- to 5-years old, but no significant differences were found at 6 years old. In whole group, the SLJ performance was higher with increased age. However, no significant differences were found between boys aged 5 and 6 years.

Conclusion:

This study provides references values for muscle strength assessment through SLJ test carried out on a large sample of Spanish preschoolers.

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Rosenda Murillo, Maya J. Lambiase, Bonny J. Rockette-Wagner, Andrea M. Kriska, Jeffrey P. Haibach and Rebecca C. Thurston

Background:

This study examined associations between physical activity (recreational, nonrecreational) and sleep duration among a nationally representative diverse sample of U.S. adults.

Methods:

We used cross-sectional data from 9,205 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007 to 2012 participants aged 20 to 65 years who identified as White, Black, or Hispanic. Activity (ie, recreation, occupation, and transportation activity) was categorized into quartiles. Sleep duration was categorized as short (≤6 hours/night) or normal (>6 to ≤9 hours/night). Logistic regression was used to estimate associations of activity with sleep duration.

Results:

Recommended levels of recreation activity and moderate levels of transportation activity were associated with normal sleep duration [Odds Ratio (OR): = 1.33, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 1.08, 1.65; OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.02, 1.62, respectively]. High occupation physical activity was associated with shorter sleep duration (OR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.49, 0.71). Differences were observed by race/ethnicity in associations of recreation and occupation activity with sleep duration.

Conclusions:

White individuals who engaged in some recreation activity, relative to being inactive, had more favorable sleep duration; whereas, high levels of occupation activity were associated with worse sleep duration among White and Black individuals. Physical activity was not associated with sleep duration among Hispanics.