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Amanda L. Hyde, David E. Conroy, Aaron L. Pincus and Nilam Ram

Physical activity is a widely accessible and effective tool for improving well-being. This study aimed to unpack the feel-good effects of free-time physical activity. Multilevel models were applied to repeated measures of daily free-time physical activity and four types of feeling states obtained from 190 undergraduate students. Physical activity was not associated with pleasant–deactivated, unpleasant–activated, or unpleasant–deactivated feelings. People who were more physically active overall had higher pleasant–activated feelings than people who were less physically active, and on days when people were more physically active than was typical for them, they reported higher levels of pleasant–activated feelings. Both the between- and within-person associations remained significant after controlling for day of week, sleep quality, and carryover effects of previous day free-time physical activity and feeling states. Results suggest that both increases in overall levels and acute bouts of free-time physical activity are associated with increases in feelings of pleasant-activation.

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Andreas Schwerdtfeger, Ragna Eberhardt, Andrea Chmitorz and Eva Schaller

There is converging evidence that physical activity influences affective states. It has been found that aerobic exercise programs can significantly diminish negative affect. Moreover, among healthy individuals, moderate levels of physical activity seem to increase energetic arousal and positive affect. However, the predictive utility of affective states for bodily movement has rarely been investigated. In this study, we examined whether momentarily assessed affect is associated with bodily movement in everyday life. Using a previously published data set (Schwerdtfeger, Eberhardt, & Chmitorz, 2008), we reanalyzed 12-hr ecological momentary assessment (EMA) data from 124 healthy volunteers. Electronic momentary positive-activated affect (EMA-PAA) and negative affect (EMA-NA) were assessed via handheld computers, and bodily movement was recorded via accelerosensors. Generalized linear mixed models were calculated. Results indicated that EMA-PAA increases were accompanied by bodily movement increases of varying intensity. EMA-NA was also positively associated with increases in certain kinds of bodily movement. In light of previous research, this finding suggests that affect and bodily movement may have circular effects on each other.

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John B. Nezlek, Marzena Cypryańska, Piotr Cypryański, Karolina Chlebosz, Karolina Jenczylik, Joanna Sztachańska and Anna M. Zalewska

general) will be next week?” Our measure of affect was based on a circumplex model (e.g.,  Feldman Barrett & Russell, 1998 ) that distinguishes the valence (positive or negative) and arousal (activated or deactivated) of affect. Positive activated affect (PA) was measured with the items happy, proud

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Paul E. Yeatts, Ronald Davis, Jun Oh and Gwang-Yon Hwang

.1097/00001504-200503000-00013 Reed , J. , & Buck , S. ( 2009 ). The effect of regular aerobic exercise on positive-activated affect: A meta-analysis . Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 10 ( 6 ), 581 – 594 . doi:10.1016/j.psychsport.2009.05.009 10.1016/j.psychsport.2009.05.009 Ryska , T.A. ( 2002 ). The effects of

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Kazuhiro Harada, Kouhei Masumoto, Ai Fukuzawa, Michiko Touyama, Koji Sato, Narihiko Kondo and Shuichi Okada

older adults: Recommendation from the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Heart Association . Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 39 ( 8 ), 1435 – 45 . doi: 10.1249/mss.0b013e3180616aa2 Reed , J. , & Ones , D.S. ( 2006 ). The effect of acute aerobic exercise on positive

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Nicola Brown and Yasmin Bowmer

). The effect of regular aerobic exercise on positive-activated affect: A meta-analysis . Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 10 ( 6 ), 581 – 594 . doi:10.1016/j.psychsport.2009.05.009 10.1016/j.psychsport.2009.05.009 Reiner , M. , Niermann , C. , Jekauc , D. , & Woll , A. ( 2012 ). A. Long

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Renee Engeln, Margaret Shavlik and Colleen Daly

physique anxious females . Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 8 , 463 – 476 . doi:10.1016/j.psychsport.2006.10.005 10.1016/j.psychsport.2006.10.005 Reed , J. , & Ones , D.S. ( 2006 ). The effect of acute aerobic exercise on positive activated affect: A meta-analysis . Journal of Sport and Exercise

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Anthony G. Delli Paoli, Alan L. Smith and Matthew B. Pontifex

). The effect of acute aerobic exercise on positive activated affect: A meta-analysis . Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 7 , 477 – 514 . doi: 10.1016/j.psychsport.2005.11.003 Roig , M. , Nordbrandt , S. , Geertsen , S.S. , & Nielsen , J.B. ( 2013 ). The effects of cardiovascular exercise on

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Jennifer Brunet, Eva Guérin and Nicolas Speranzini

, J. , & Ones , D.S. ( 2006 ). The effect of acute aerobic exercise on positive activated affect: A meta-analysis . Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 7 , 477 – 514 . doi:10.1016/j.psychsport.2005.11.003 10.1016/j.psychsport.2005.11.003 Rhodes , R.E. , & Kates , A. ( 2015 ). Can the

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Gorden Sudeck, Stephanie Jeckel and Tanja Schubert

version]. doi:10.1093/acrefore/9780190236557.013.231 10.1093/acrefore/9780190236557.013.231 Reed , J. , & Ones , D.S. ( 2006 ). The effect of acute aerobic exercise on positive activated affect: A meta-analysis . Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 7 , 477 – 514 . doi:10.1016/j.psychsport.2005