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Haiko B. Zimmermann, Débora Knihs, Fernando Diefenthaeler, Brian MacIntosh, and Juliano Dal Pupo

improvement in voluntary performance, known as postactivation performance enhancement (PAPE). 3 – 5 Physical performance may be affected after a CA either positively or negatively, depending on the balance between fatigue and potentiation. 6 From this perspective, several studies have been conducted over the

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Thomas I. Gee, Paul Harsley, and Daniel C. Bishop

the same training session. 4 Programming exercises in this paired manner provides an efficient mode of training both higher-load and lower-load training exercises in the same session and can provide an additional benefit by invoking postactivation performance enhancement. 4 , 6 Postactivation

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Daniel Boullosa, Marco Beato, Antonio Dello Iacono, Francisco Cuenca-Fernández, Kenji Doma, Moritz Schumann, Alessandro Moura Zagatto, Irineu Loturco, and David G. Behm

performance has been recently debated with the proposal of an alternative term, referred to as postactivation performance enhancement (PAPE). 9 The reasons behind this dualism (PAP vs PAPE) refer to the association of PAP with evoked twitch verification, which, in turn, would be related to MLC

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Ian C. Smith and Brian R. MacIntosh

In their recent commentary, Boullosa et al 1 present a discussion about the terminology “postactivation potentiation” (PAP) and “postactivation performance enhancement” (PAPE), but they do not, apparently, understand these terms. In fact, their misinterpretation of PAP is the very reason the term

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Daniel Boullosa, Marco Beato, Antonio Dello Iacono, Francisco Cuenca-Fernández, Kenji Doma, Moritz Schumann, Alessandro Moura Zagatto, Irineu Loturco, and David G. Behm

postactivation performance enhancement [PAPE]) and that there is no possibility for alternative terminologies. The proposed taxonomy highlights the conditioning activity, testing activity and population, factors causally related to the onset, and magnitude of potentiation effects. For instance, the rationale for

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Wing-Chun V. Yeung, Chris Bishop, Anthony N. Turner, and Sean J. Maloney

, this is perhaps more correctly termed as postactivation performance enhancement as electrically evoked contractile properties are not typically assessed. 2 , 3 As the performance of heavy resistance exercise is likely to be contraindicated prior to competition in most instances, the performance of

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Antonio Dello Iacono, Marco Beato, and Israel Halperin

Postactivation performance enhancement (PAPE) refers to a short-term improvement in athletic tasks, such as jumping, sprinting, and throwing, induced by a previous conditioning activity. 1 The onset and magnitude of PAPE effects are influenced by a number of variables and their interactions 2

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Helmi Chaabene, Yassine Negra, Senda Sammoud, Jason Moran, Rodrigo Ramirez-Campillo, Urs Granacher, and Olaf Prieske

that the performance of strength exercises before jump exercises has the potential to acutely enhance subsequent jump performance, a phenomenon known as postactivation performance enhancement (PAPE). 3 The inclusion of sequenced exercises that elicit acute PAPE effects into long-term training programs