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Simulating Others’ Realities: Insiders Reflect on Disability Simulations

Jennifer Leo and Donna Goodwin

The purpose of this interpretative phenomenological analysis study was to explore the meaning persons who experience disability ascribed to disability simulations as a pedagogical tool. Reflective writing, one-on-one interviews, and field notes were used to gather information on disability simulation use in a required postsecondary kinesiology course. Seven people who use wheelchairs full time (3 men, 4 women), ranging in age from 28 to 44 yr (average age = 36) shared their perspectives. The thematic analysis revealed 3 themes. The theme “Disability Mentors Required” revealed the participants’ collective questioning of their absence from the design and implementation of disability simulations. “Life Is Not a Simulation” illustrated the juxtaposition of disability reality and disability simulations. “Why Are They Laughing?” contrasted the use of fun as a strategy to engage students against the risk of distracting them from deeper reflection. Through the lens of ableism, the importance of disability representation in the development and implementation of disability simulations was affirmed as a means to deepen pedagogical reflexiveness of their intended use.

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Negotiated Meanings of Disability Simulations in an Adapted Physical Activity Course: Learning From Student Reflections

Jennifer Leo and Donna Goodwin

Disability simulations have been used as a pedagogical tool to simulate the functional and cultural experiences of disability. Despite their widespread application, disagreement about their ethical use, value, and efficacy persists. The purpose of this study was to understand how postsecondary kinesiology students experienced participation in disability simulations. An interpretative phenomenological approach guided the study’s collection of journal entries and clarifying one-on-one interviews with four female undergraduate students enrolled in a required adapted physical activity course. The data were analyzed thematically and interpreted using the conceptual framework of situated learning. Three themes transpired: unnerving visibility, negotiating environments differently, and tomorrow I’ll be fine. The students described emotional responses to the use of wheelchairs as disability artifacts, developed awareness of environmental barriers to culturally and socially normative activities, and moderated their discomfort with the knowledge they could end the simulation at any time.

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High School Athletic Participation and Postsecondary Educational and Occupational Mobility: A Focus on Race and Gender

Donald Sabo, Merrill J. Melnick, and Beth E. Vanfossen

This study examines the impact of race and gender differences on the social mobility of high school athletes using the longitudinal, panel data of the High School and Beyond study. Regressions of educational and occupational attainment measures on sports participation were estimated for subgroups differentiated by race/ethnic status, gender, and school location (urban, suburban, and rural). It was found that participation in high school sports was most likely to affect the postsecondary status attainment of white males and, to a lesser extent, suburban white females and rural Hispanic females. High school athletic participation had almost no effect on the college-going behavior or educational expectations of black males and females. Interscholastic athletic participation was generally unrelated to postsecondary occupational status and aspirations.

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Incorporating E-learning to Enhance Instruction and Student Experiences in Collegiate Physical Activity Courses

Jared Russell, Danielle Wadsworth, Peter Hastie, and Mary Rudisill

The purpose of this paper is to describe the precursors to and development of the School of Kinesiology's portal, which is used to deliver multimedia content to the approximately 7,000 students annually enrolled in physical activity and wellness program courses. Grounded in research, the paper addresses the initial rationale for changing the physical activity program focus, the implementation of a new delivery system of course content, and the benefits to students and instructors that have been realized. Research possibilities are also outlined. The paper concludes with an examination of issues that faculty at other institutions might consider when developing an online component within their physical activity and wellness programs.

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Chapter 4: Pete Women’s Experiences of Being Mentored into Post-Secondary Faculty Positions

Patt Dodds

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A Resource for Promoting Personal and Social Responsibility in Higher Education: A Call to Action for Kinesiology Departments

Karisa L. Kuipers, Jennifer M. Jacobs, Paul M. Wright, and Kevin Andrew Richards

Over the last 100 years, there have been several calls to prioritize promoting personal and social responsibility (PSR) in higher education ( Association of American Colleges and Universities [AAC&U], 2002 ; Reason, 2013 ). Even before those calls, fostering PSR in postsecondary students served as

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Transforming Higher Education

Wojtek Chodzko-Zajko

all the answers or control, and although the larger common goal is social benefit, all partners must feel that their distinctive potential for contribution has a role in the work of the partnership. Public postsecondary institutions and high schools provide a powerful system for effecting the

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Healthy Campus 2010: Physical Activity Trends and the Role Information Provision

Diane E. Mack, Philip M. Wilson, Virginia Lightheart, Kristin Oster, and Katie E. Gunnell

Background:

The primary purpose of this investigation was to examine the frequency and type of self-reported physical activity behavior in postsecondary students with reference to Healthy Campus 2010 objectives. The secondary purpose was to explore the role of information provision in terms of promoting physical activity behavior in postsecondary students.

Methods:

Postsecondary students were assessed (N = 127360). Employing a trend survey design, the frequency and type of physical activity behavior was assessed along with physical activity/fitness information provision across a five year period between 2000 to 2004.

Results:

In 2004, respondents meeting Healthy Campus 2010 objectives for self-reported moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was 42.20% (95% CI = 41.75 to 42.65) and 48.60% (95% CI = 48.14 to 49.06) for strength (STRENGTH) training behavior. Progress quotients demonstrated that 12.93% and 7.87% of target objective for MVPA and STRENGTH respectively had been achieved from baseline. Those who received information reported engaging in more frequent physical activity behavior compared with those who did not (P < .001).

Conclusions:

Results suggest the need for continued commitment to increasing physical activity behavior. The provision of physical activity/fitness information may be one mechanism through which this can be achieved.

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Creating Interinstitutional Collaboration to Enhance Student Learning Outcomes and Potential Kinesiology Professionalization

Lara M. Duke and Cindy K. Piletic

This paper explores the use of collaboration theory and the consensus building framework to develop institutional strategic alliances at two North American postsecondary institutions. Collaboration between institutional and/or external partners offers rich opportunities to develop creative programming that provides students with opportunities for service learning situated in a well-planned curriculum. The collaboration development capitalizes on mutually beneficial outcomes for all partners and affords more informed decision making and impact than if partners were working individually. This paper highlights two successful partnerships and outlines the future direction of those collaborative alliances.

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Intercollegiate Athletic Success and Donations at NCAA Division I Institutions

Brad R. Humphreys and Michael Mondello

The authors tested the hypothesis that donations to universities vary with athletic success using a comprehensive panel data set drawn from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) over the period of 1976–1996. Estimation of a linear reduced-form model of the determination of donations to colleges and universities indicates that postseason football bowl-game and NCAA Division I men’s basketball-tournament appearances were associated with significant increases in restricted giving and no increases in unrestricted giving to public institutions the following year, whereas only postseason basketball appearances were associated with increases in restricted giving to private institutions.