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A Resource for Promoting Personal and Social Responsibility in Higher Education: A Call to Action for Kinesiology Departments

Karisa L. Kuipers, Jennifer M. Jacobs, Paul M. Wright, and Kevin Andrew Richards

primary concern of postsecondary education. As educational priorities have shifted throughout the generations, the emphasis placed on PSR has fluctuated ( Rudolph, 1962 ). However, as the importance of social consciousness has grown in the last three decades, a renewed emphasis has been placed on

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Transforming Higher Education

Wojtek Chodzko-Zajko

higher level strategies, and reflect each institution’s distinctive identity and capabilities. Our Commitment to Transformational Change Addressing these new areas of need and opportunity will require institutional innovation and reform, for us, and for the postsecondary education sector generally. We

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Intercollegiate Athletic Success and Donations at NCAA Division I Institutions

Brad R. Humphreys and Michael Mondello

The authors tested the hypothesis that donations to universities vary with athletic success using a comprehensive panel data set drawn from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) over the period of 1976–1996. Estimation of a linear reduced-form model of the determination of donations to colleges and universities indicates that postseason football bowl-game and NCAA Division I men’s basketball-tournament appearances were associated with significant increases in restricted giving and no increases in unrestricted giving to public institutions the following year, whereas only postseason basketball appearances were associated with increases in restricted giving to private institutions.

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Children's Organized Physical Activity Patterns From Childhood into Adolescence

Leanne C. Findlay, Rochelle E. Garner, and Dafna E. Kohen

Background:

Few longitudinal studies of physical activity have included young children or used nationally representative datasets. The purpose of the current study was to explore patterns of organized physical activity for Canadian children aged 4 through 17 years.

Methods:

Data from 5 cycles of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth were analyzed separately for boys (n = 4463) and girls (n = 4354) using multiple trajectory modeling.

Results:

Boys' and girls' organized physical activity was best represented by 3 trajectory groups. For boys, these groups were labeled: high stable, high decreasing, and low decreasing participation. For girls, these groups were labeled: high decreasing, moderate stable, and low decreasing participation. Risk factors (parental education, household income, urban/rural dwelling, and single/dual parent) were explored. For boys and girls, having a parent with postsecondary education and living in a higher income household were associated with a greater likelihood of weekly participation in organized physical activity. Living in an urban area was also significantly associated with a greater likelihood of weekly participation for girls.

Conclusions:

Results suggest that Canadian children's organized physical activity is best represented by multiple patterns of participation that tend to peak in middle childhood and decline into adolescence.

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Life Transitions in the Waning of Physical Activity From Childhood to Adult Life in the Trois-Rivières Study

Richard Larouche, Louis Laurencelle, Roy J. Shephard, and Francois Trudeau

Background:

Several studies have reported an age-related decline of physical activity (PA). We examined the impact of 4 important transitional periods—adolescence, the beginning of postsecondary education, entry into the labor market, and parenthood—on the PA of participants in the Trois-Rivières quasi-experimental study.

Methods:

In 2008, 44 women and 42 men aged 44.0 ± 1.2 years were given a semistructured interview; the frequency and duration of physical activities were examined during each of these transition periods. Subjects had been assigned to either an experimental program [5 h of weekly physical education (PE) from Grades 1 to 6] or the standard curriculum (40 min of weekly PE) throughout primary school.

Results:

The percentage of individuals undertaking ≥ 5 h of PA per week decreased from 70.4% to 17.0% between adolescence and midlife. The largest decline occurred on entering the labor market (from 55.9% to 23.4%). At midlife, there were no significant differences of PA level between experimental and control groups. Men were more active than women at each transition except for parenthood.

Conclusions:

Our results highlight a progressive nonlinear decline of PA involvement in both groups. Promotion initiatives should target these periods to prevent the decline of PA.

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Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion—Utilizing Student Voices During Strategic Decision-Making Processes

Jared Russell, Matt Beth, Danielle Wadsworth, Stephanie George, Wendy Wheeler, and Harald Barkhoff

Act. The band office attempts to act as an interface between Canadian systems of government and Indigenous traditional systems of governance. Indigenous systems do not yet apply to postsecondary education in a way that is overseen by a federal or provincial governing body. I am the direct descendent

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Sociodemographic Factors Associated With Meeting the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines Among Adults: Findings From the Canadian Health Measures Survey

Scott Rollo, Karen C. Roberts, Felix Bang, Valerie Carson, Jean-Philippe Chaput, Rachel C. Colley, Ian Janssen, and Mark S. Tremblay

61.9 61.5 64.7  1 23.4 23.5 22.6  2+ 14.7 15.0 12.6 Race, %  White 79.8 78.5 88.8  Nonwhite 20.2 21.5 11.2 a Highest household education, %  Less than secondary school graduation 5.4 3.5 18.9  Secondary school graduation 12.1 11.5 16.3  Postsecondary education 82.5 85.0 64.8 Movement behaviors  Daily

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Work-Integrated Learning in the Development of a Kinesiology Degree

Kyle Guay and Carey L. Simpson

and recommendations that students enter into postsecondary education to enhance aspects of their employability ( Canadian University Survey Consortium, 2019 ). A report prepared by the Royal Bank of Canada in 2018 noted that many of Canada’s postsecondary institutions are focusing solely on content

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Longitudinal Analysis of Patterns and Correlates of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Women From Preconception to Postpartum: The Singapore Preconception Study of Long-Term Maternal and Child Outcomes Cohort

Anne H.Y. Chu, Natarajan Padmapriya, Shuen Lin Tan, Claire Marie J.L. Goh, Yap-Seng Chong, Lynette P. Shek, Kok Hian Tan, Peter D. Gluckman, Fabian K.P. Yap, Yung Seng Lee, See Ling Loy, Jerry K.Y. Chan, Keith M. Godfrey, Johan G. Eriksson, Shiao-Yng Chan, Jonathan Y. Bernard, and Falk Müller-Riemenschneider

postsecondary education or below. Those with a postgraduate education had with less screen time during pregnancy compared to those with a postsecondary education or below. Figure 5 Associations of correlates with screen time from preconception to pregnancy and postpartum in women. Screen time includes TV time

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The Future of Work: What It Is and How Our Resilience in the Face of It Matters

Suri Duitch

, educators must think broadly about the skills and knowledge their current and future students will require to be successful in their careers. While kinesiology programs already offer technical skills and disciplinary knowledge, there are other requisite and fundamental components of a postsecondary