Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 10 items for :

  • "power–duration relationship" x
Clear All
Restricted access

David Giles, Joel B. Chidley, Nicola Taylor, Ollie Torr, Josh Hadley, Tom Randall and Simon Fryer

power–duration relationship for all-out exercise . Eur J Appl Physiol . 2012 ; 112 ( 7 ): 2467 – 2473 . doi:10.1007/s00421-011-2214-7 10.1007/s00421-011-2214-7 24. Burnley M , Davison G , Baker JR . Effects of priming exercise on VO 2 kinetics and the power-duration relationship . Med Sci

Restricted access

Bettina Karsten, Jonathan Baker, Fernando Naclerio, Andreas Klose, Antonino Bianco and Alfred Nimmerichter

parameter of the power–duration relationship, W-prime (W′), represents the amount of work that can be performed above CP. At a magnitude-dependent rate, W′ is reduced when PO > CP. During severe-intensity exercise (ie, >CP), W′ is predictably expended at a rate that is related to the development of a V ˙ O

Restricted access

Len Parker Simpson and Mehdi Kordi

Purpose:

Typically, accessing the asymptote (critical power; CP) and curvature constant (W′) parameters of the hyperbolic power–duration relationship requires multiple constant-power exhaustive-exercise trials spread over several visits. However, more recently single-visit protocols and personal power meters have been used. This study investigated the practicality of using a 2-trial, single-visit protocol in providing reliable CP and W′ estimates.

Methods:

Eight trained cyclists underwent 3- and 12-min maximal-exercise trials in a single session to derive (2-trial) CP and W′ estimates. On a separate occasion a 5-min trial was performed, providing a 3rd trial to calculate (3-trial) CP and W′.

Results:

There were no differences in CP (283 ± 66 vs 282 ± 65 W) or W′ (18.72 ± 6.21 vs 18.27 ± 6.29 kJ) obtained from either the 2-trial or 3-trial method, respectively. After 2 familiarization sessions (completing a 3- and a 12-min trial on both occasions), both CP and W′ remained reliable over additional separate measurements.

Conclusions:

The current study demonstrates that after 2 familiarization sessions, reliable CP and W′ parameters can be obtained from trained cyclists using only 2 maximal-exercise trials. These results offer practitioners a practical, time-efficient solution for incorporating power–duration testing into applied athlete support.

Restricted access

Dajo Sanders, Mathieu Heijboer, Ibrahim Akubat, Kenneth Meijer and Matthijs K. Hesselink

Purpose:

To assess if short-duration (5 to ~300 s) high-power performance can accurately be predicted using the anaerobic power reserve (APR) model in professional cyclists.

Methods:

Data from 4 professional cyclists from a World Tour cycling team were used. Using the maximal aerobic power, sprint peak power output, and an exponential constant describing the decrement in power over time, a power-duration relationship was established for each participant. To test the predictive accuracy of the model, several all-out field trials of different durations were performed by each cyclist. The power output achieved during the all-out trials was compared with the predicted power output by the APR model.

Results:

The power output predicted by the model showed very large to nearly perfect correlations to the actual power output obtained during the all-out trials for each cyclist (r = .88 ± .21, .92 ± .17, .95 ± .13, and .97 ± .09). Power output during the all-out trials remained within an average of 6.6% (53 W) of the predicted power output by the model.

Conclusions:

This preliminary pilot study presents 4 case studies on the applicability of the APR model in professional cyclists using a field-based approach. The decrement in all-out performance during high-intensity exercise seems to conform to a general relationship with a single exponential-decay model describing the decrement in power vs increasing duration. These results are in line with previous studies using the APR model to predict performance during brief all-out trials. Future research should evaluate the APR model with a larger sample size of elite cyclists.

Restricted access

Alan Chorley, Richard P. Bott, Simon Marwood and Kevin L. Lamb

of the power-duration relationship . J Appl Physiol . 2010 ; 108 ( 4 ): 866 – 874 . PubMed ID: 20093659 doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.91425.2008 10.1152/japplphysiol.91425.2008 20093659 8. Vanhatalo A , Fulford J , DiMenna FJ , Jones AM . Influence of hyperoxia on muscle metabolic

Restricted access

Mehdi Kordi, Campbell Menzies and Andy Galbraith

Human physiology in linear energetics can be characterized by the hyperbolic power–duration relationship. 1 , 2 Much of the literature in this area has focused on cycling, using power measurements, because it is controlled, accurate, negates environmental conditions, and the mechanical output is

Restricted access

Jason C. Bartram, Dominic Thewlis, David T. Martin and Kevin I. Norton

on the parameters of the power–duration relationship . J Appl Physiol . 2010 ; 108 ( 4 ): 866 – 874 . PubMed ID: 20093659 doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.91425.2008 10.1152/japplphysiol.91425.2008 20093659 5. Skiba PF , Chidnok W , Vanhatalo A , Jones AM . Modeling the expenditure and

Restricted access

M. Travis Byrd, Jonathan Robert Switalla, Joel E. Eastman, Brian J. Wallace, Jody L. Clasey and Haley C. Bergstrom

.1007/BF00717953 10.1007/BF00717953 1555562 6. Vanhatalo A , McNaughton LR , Siegler J , Jones AM . Influence of induced alkalosis on the power–duration relationship of all-out exercise . Med Sci Sports Exerc . 2010 ; 42 ( 3 ): 563 – 570 . PubMed doi:10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181b71a4a 19952817 10

Restricted access

Eva Piatrikova, Ana C. Sousa, Javier T. Gonzalez and Sean Williams

exhaustive exercise on the parameters of the power–duration relationship . J Appl Physiol . 2010 ; 108 ( 4 ): 866 – 874 . PubMed ID: 20093659 doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.91425.2008 10.1152/japplphysiol.91425.2008 20093659 18. Green S , Dawson B . Measurement of anaerobic capacities in humans

Restricted access

Mark Kramer, Mark Watson, Rosa Du Randt and Robert W. Pettitt

.1.2.137 35. Burnley M , Jones AM . Power–duration relationship: physiology, fatigue, and the limits of human performance . Eur J Sport Sci . 2018 ; 18 ( 1 ): 1 – 12 . PubMed ID: 27806677 doi:10.1080/17461391.2016.1249524 10.1080/17461391.2016.1249524 27806677 36. Jones AM , Poole DC