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Emily M. Jones, Jun-hyung Baek and James D. Wyant

Purpose:

The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors influencing preservice teachers’ (PST) experiences integrating technology within a guided action-based research project in the context of student teaching.

Methods:

Participants were enrolled at a rural, mid-Atlantic university (N = 80, 53 male; 27 female). Researchers retrieved archived data from five semesters of physical education (PE) student teaching cohorts. Data sources included: Technology Action Research Project poster presentations (n = 75) and reflective journal entries (n = 234). All identifiable information was removed, and qualitative data were analyzed inductively.

Results:

Three themes and subthemes emerged Student Clientele, Self as Teacher, and Others as Systems of Support as contributing agents in PSTs’ experiences integrating technology.

Discussion/Conclusion:

Results of this study support technology-rich field-based experiences for PSTs that are guided by an action research framework. Findings enhance our understanding of factors that facilitate and hinder early career PE teachers use of technology in teaching and learning settings.

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Mats M. Hordvik, Ann MacPhail and Lars T. Ronglan

Purpose:

In this study, we articulate and share our knowledge and understanding of teaching and learning Sport Education in physical education teacher education (PETE): (a) How did the PETE faculty member experience teaching about teaching Sport Education? and (b) How did the PSTs experience learning about teaching Sport Education?

Method:

One PETE faculty member (the first author) and twelve PSTs took part in a university Sport Education unit. Data were collected through the PETE faculty member’s open-ended reflective diary and focus groups with three PST teams.

Results:

The PETE faculty member and PSTs experienced various challenges such as bridging theory and practice when learning about teaching Sport Education and articulating the “what”, “how” and “why” when teaching about teaching Sport Education.

Conclusion:

Sport Education is a complex curriculum and instructional model, encouraging further interrogation of the theoretical implications of the model.

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Jaimie McMullen, Hans van der Mars and Julie A. Jahn

The purpose of this study is to describe the experiences of physical education teacher education (PETE) majors enrolled in an internship course that provided them with authentic experiences promoting and facilitating a before-school physical activity (PA) program and to examine the associated implications for PETE programs within the Comprehensive School Physical Activity (CSPAP) framework. In this study, five PETE majors were recruited to participate. Data were collected from several sources including participant observation, interviews, systematic observation, and document analysis. The results show that preservice physical educators struggled with PA promotion as a consequence of perceptions of early programmatic success, feelings of nervousness and influences of their existing beliefs about the role of the physical educator. Therefore, when considering the role of the physical educator relative to a CSPAP, PETE programs should consider making adjustments to their curricula to include experiences that allow preservice teachers to practice skills associated with out-of-class PA promotion.

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Stefan Ward, Heidi Henschel Pellett and Mark I. Perez

Purpose:

The purpose of this study was to explore preservice teachers’ experiences of cognitive disequilibrium (CD) theory during a service-learning project in a study abroad experience.

Method:

A case study with 8 participants was used. Data sources consisted of: Formal interviews, videos of planning, videos of teaching, videos of reflection sessions, and informal interviews. Data were analyzed utilizing open and axial coding (Corbin & Strauss, 2008). Trustworthiness strategies included: prolonged engagement, multiple data source triangulation, and member checks.

Results:

Results indicated four themes: “We made it our own thing”, “Summer camp for teachers”, “Struggle and disequilibrium”, and “By the end it was a transformation”.

Discussion/Conclusions:

CD was ultimately positive for these students. The positive resolution of CD catalyzed a transformative effect on their perceptions of their teaching. This was supported by positive peer interaction.

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Natalie Jayne Lander, Lisa Michele Barnett, Helen Brown and Amanda Telford

The purpose of this study was to investigate instruction and assessment of fundamental movement skills (FMSs) by Physical Education (PE) teachers of Year 7 girls. Of 168 secondary school PE teachers, many had received little FMSs professional development, and although most assessed student FMSs proficiency, the quality of assessment was variable. Neither years of experience nor confidence influenced the quality of assessment tools used; however, greater FMSs training improved assessment practice regularity. Teachers more recently out of preservice were more confident in demonstrating FMSs. The results suggest that FMSs education for teachers should be a priority inclusion in both the training of preservice teachers and the ongoing professional development of in-service teachers.

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Jun-Hyung Baek, Emily Jones, Sean Bulger and Andrea Taliaferro

begun to consider how attitudes and beliefs related to technology use in the classroom are also constructed during this period ( Ertmer & Ottenbreit-Leftwich, 2010 ; Wyant, Jones, & Bulger, 2015 ). Wyant et al. ( 2015 ) suggested that existing beliefs of pre-service PE teachers that were constructed

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Louisa R. Peralta, Claire L. Marvell and Wayne G. Cotton

outstanding results, while the 5 km parkrun event recognizes participation, regardless of performance and ability. Recognising participation in physical activity within school is something I hope to bring to my current practice as a pre-service teacher. (Participant 8) Although these statements are not

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Carlos Capella-Peris, Jesús Gil-Gómez and Òscar Chiva-Bartoll

physical education teacher education: Recommendations for practice and research . Quest, 65 ( 3 ), 332 – 353 . doi:10.1080/00336297.2013.773533 10.1080/00336297.2013.773533 Chambers , D.J. , & Lavery , S. ( 2012 ). Service-learning: A valuable component of pre-service teacher education

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Jan-Erik Romar and Magnus Ferry

, T. , Mandigo , J. , & Kosnik , C. ( 2013 ). Elementary classroom teachers and physical education: Change in teacher-related factors during pre-service teacher education . Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, 18, 169 – 183 . doi:10.1080/17408989.2011.649723 10

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K. Andrew R. Richards, Colin G. Pennington and Oleg A. Sinelnikov

.1177/1356336X15596984 10.1177/1356336X15596984 * Chow , B.C. , & Fry , J. ( 1999 ). Teaching practice: Pre-service physical educators’ perspectives . International Sports Studies, 21 , 25 – 54 . * Chroinin , D.N. , & Coulter , M. ( 2012 ). The impact of initial teacher education on understandings