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Sandra Silva-Santos, Amanda Santos, Michael Duncan, Susana Vale and Jorge Mota

feet, and locomotor skills, such as walking and hopping to describe goal-directed human movement ( Barnett, Salmon, & Hesketh, 2016 ; Sanchez et al., 2017 ), that are ideally learned during preschool and early school years ( Barnett, Salmon, et al., 2016 ) and which are associated with the practice of

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Megan A. Kirk and Ryan E. Rhodes

Preschoolers with developmental delay (DD) are at risk for poor fundamental movement skills (FMS), but a paucity of early FMS interventions exist. The purpose of this review was to critically appraise the existing interventions to establish direction for future trials targeting preschoolers with DD. A total of 11 studies met the inclusion criteria. Major findings were summarized based on common subtopics of overall intervention effect, locomotor skill outcomes, object-control outcomes, and gender differences. Trials ranged from 8 to 24 weeks and offered 540–1700 min of instruction. The majority of trials (n = 9) significantly improved FMS of preschoolers with DD, with a large intervention effect (η2 = 0.57–0.85). This review supports the utility of interventions to improve FMS of preschoolers with DD. Future researchers are encouraged to include more robust designs, a theoretical framework, and involvement of parents and teachers in the delivery of the intervention.

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Sofiya Alhassan, Christine W. St. Laurent and Sarah Burkart

could potentially reduce the detrimental impact of physical-inactivity-related health outcomes as children age. Therefore, experts have recommended that physical activity interventions be initiated as early as possible (i.e., preschool age; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2008 ). Due to

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Sofiya Alhassan, Christine W. St. Laurent, Sarah Burkart, Cory J. Greever and Matthew N. Ahmadi

Obesity-related health behaviors (ORHBs) have been identified as risk factors for increased unhealthy weight gain in preschoolers (2.9–5 y). 1 – 3 ORHBs include low physical activity (PA), obesogenic dietary intake patterns (lower fruit and vegetable consumption, greater consumption of energy

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Mirko Brandes, Berit Steenbock and Norman Wirsik

what extent the published METs can also be applied to preschoolers. 1 Although some research has been done on predicting EE for different activities in preschoolers, it is, however, limited due to the use of direct observation (and again rigid estimates of METs) as the criterion measurement, as was

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Ali Brian, Adam Pennell, Ryan Sacko and Michaela Schenkelburg

proficient MC and participate in PA during early childhood to combat the negative developmental trajectories associated with an unhealthy weight status. In response to these concerns, multiple organizations have established guidelines or standards that address motor skill development and PA in preschools. In

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Yvonne G. Ellis, Dylan P. Cliff, Steven J. Howard and Anthony D. Okely

intensity) ( 31 ). Preschoolers appear to spend ∼64% of their waking time sedentary, predominantly sitting ( 12 , 19 ). Spending prolonged periods in SB seems to be negatively associated with health and developmental outcomes in children, particularly children who are obese ( 7 , 24 , 32 ). In preschoolers

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Berit Steenbock, Marvin N. Wright, Norman Wirsik and Mirko Brandes

, and are increasingly being used in studies with very young children ( Hills et al., 2014 ). However, traditional linear model equations developed for activity count-based data do not provide accurate estimates of EE in preschoolers ( Janssen et al., 2013 ; Reilly et al., 2006 ). Because the

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Haixia Guo, Michaela A. Schenkelberg, Jennifer R. O’Neill, Marsha Dowda and Russell R. Pate

children, participation in a greater amount and variety of PAs is conducive to long-term healthy weight maintenance ( 19 ). Many children of preschool age (3–5 y) are insufficiently active ( 14 , 30 , 31 ) and do not meet new PA guidelines ( 14 , 29 ). Understanding the correlates of PA in young children

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Sharon E. Taverno Ross

This paper provides an overview of the growing U.S. Latino population, the obesity disparity experienced by this population, and the role of parents and physical activity in promoting a healthy weight status in Latino preschool children. The main portion of this paper reviews seven intervention