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Zachary Wahl-Alexander and Matthew D. Curtner-Smith

The classroom ecology paradigm ( Doyle, 1979 , 1986 ) has proven to be a useful theoretical lens through which physical education teacher education (PETE) faculty can help preservice teachers (PTs) learn to teach. PETE faculty who have used this lens have either drawn from the limited amount of

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Zachary Wahl-Alexander, Matthew D. Curtner-Smith and Oleg A. Sinelnikov

secure compliance with their managerial and instructional systems ( Tousignant & Siedentop, 1983 ; Wahl-Alexander & Curtner-Smith, 2014 ). In addition, inexperienced inservice teachers and preservice teachers (PTs) often make the mistake of compromising with students when faced with persistent negative

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Tan Leng Goh and Kristin Scrabis-Fletcher

implemented as part of course curriculum with school partnerships in a university PETE program to prepare preservice teachers to be effective PALs ( Ciotto & Fede, 2017 ). Although more universities are increasingly integrating CSPAP training into their PETE curriculum, research on the effectiveness of

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Christine Galvan, Karen Meaney and Virginia Gray

new knowledge to an existing framework of knowledge. Constructivism assists preservice teachers in their ability to select and transform newly acquired information, reflect, construct ideas based on their experiences, and make decisions grounded in cumulative experiences ( Richardson, 2003 ). In the

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Louisa R. Peralta, Claire L. Marvell and Wayne G. Cotton

to provide evidence of their effectiveness and their impact on preservice teachers’ learning. In 2012, the Commonwealth Government’s Productivity Commission highlighted the need for an evidence base to evaluate teacher preparation and track the subsequent performance of graduating preservice teachers

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Kelsey McEntyre, Matthew D. Curtner-Smith and K. Andrew R. Richards

The classroom ecology paradigm ( Doyle, 1977 , 1979 , 2005 ) has provided a theoretical lens that can be used to help both inservice and preservice teachers (PTs) improve their effectiveness. The key objective of the paradigm is to discover how order and cooperation are established between

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Jenn M. Jacobs, K. Andrew R. Richards, Zach Wahl-Alexander and James D. Ressler

Guided by the Society of Health and Physical Educators America ( 2017 ) standards for initial licensure, physical education teacher education (PETE) programs are tasked with preparing preservice teachers (PTs) with the knowledge and skills needed to teach effectively ( Graber, Killian, & Woods

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Jayne M. Jenkins, Alex Garn and Patience Jenkins

The purpose of this study was to identify what and how preservice teachers observe when peer coaching during an early field experience. Twenty-three male and 14 female preservice teachers trained in peer coaching participated in the study. Coaches observed a peer partner teach five 40-min lessons to small groups of elementary or junior high school students in a semester-long second practicum experience. During observation, coaches completed a Peer Coaching Form that included a praise statement and observation notes. A total of 169 Peer Coaching Forms containing 946 statements were collected and analyzed using traditional, naturalistic methods of inductive analysis. Three themes emerged: (a) systematic observation, (b) theory to practice, and (c) students as individuals. Observation changes occurring across the semester suggest peer coaching needs to occur over an extended period of time emphasizing the role of coach as observer for optimal teacher knowledge development.

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Jayne M. Jenkins and Mary Lou Veal

Peer coaching has recently been incorporated into teacher training programs in order to help novice teachers learn theory and incorporate teaching skills, models, and methods into the classroom. Although recent research on peer coaching has identified an increase in the reflective practice of preservice teachers (PTs), few researchers have examined how teacher knowledge develops in the coaching experience. The purpose of this study was to describe the kinds of knowledge exhibited by 8 PTs during coaching activities, and how the roles of teacher and coach contributed to knowledge development during an elementary physical education field-based methods course. Data collection included observations, postlesson conferences, and daily written reports. Results revealed that pedagogical content knowing (PCKg) developed differently in the roles of teacher and coach. Growth in the teaching role resulted initially from interaction of two knowledge components (i.e., students and pedagogy), and later from interaction of three or more components (subject matter, environmental context, and general pedagogical knowledge).

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Dana Perlman

The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of an intervention grounded in Self-Determination Theory on preservice teachers’ instructional behaviors and the motivational responses of their students. A total of 62 preservice physical education teachers enrolled in a secondary physical education content and methods course were randomly assigned to either a treatment (n = 31) or a control group (n = 31). The study employed a pretest/posttest design and data were collected through: (a) observation of preservice teachers’ instruction, (b) a survey measuring preservice teachers’ perceptions of their autonomy support, and (c) a survey measuring secondary students’ motivation. Data analysis used repeated-measures ANOVAs to examine differences between the groups. Results indicated significant changes in autonomy-support for both teachers and students exposed to the intervention.