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Jenna D. Gilchrist, David E. Conroy and Catherine M. Sabiston

). Unique emotional experiences relate to differential outcomes. For example, pride results from an individual engaging in, or presenting with, valued behaviors and/or characteristics and provides feedback that the individual is competent and warrants high status ( Pekrun, Elliot, & Maier, 2006 ; Tracy

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Philip Furley, Fanny Thrien, Johannes Klinge and Jannik Dörr

of distinct emotions that are autonomously (or automatically) expressed and understood in a universal manner. For example, humans are assumed to express happiness ( Shiota et al., 2017 ) and/or pride ( Tracy & Matsumoto, 2008 ) with universal nonverbal signals following pleasant experiences and

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Heather Sykes

A new form of sporting settler homonationalism emerged in the Pride Houses at the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics. For the first time ever, Pride Houses were set up where gay and lesbian supporters watched and celebrated the Olympic events. Drawing on poststructuralism, queer and settler colonial studies, the paper analyzes how the Pride Houses were based on settler colonial discourses about participation and displacement. A settler discourse about First Nations and Two-Spirit participation in the Pride Houses allowed gay and lesbian Canadian settlers to both remember and forget the history of settlement. Another settler discourse took for granted the displacement of Two-Spirit youth from their community center and Indigenous people from their traditional territories in order for the Olympics and the Pride Houses to take place. The paper suggests that queering settler politics in sport means confronting, rather than disavowing, colonialism and challenging homonational forms of gay and lesbian inclusion in sport mega- events.

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Ted B. Peetz

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Ryan King-White

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James G. Thompson

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Brian Wilson and Philip White

This paper examines the development of a grassroots movement to revive the defunct Ottawa Rough Riders CFL franchise. Particular attention is paid to the theoretical implications of this movement for understanding social processes of collective action in sport-related contexts, the political economic forces that guide/structure these processes, and relationships between sport-related interest groups, the state and mass media. This historical inquiry and theoretical discussion is based on interviews that were conducted with key members of the revival movement (in 1999 and 2000) and on a content and textual analysis of mass media coverage of the group (from February 1998 until July 2000). The paper concludes with some comments about the potential relevance of this study for broader work on community, identity, and sport and with recommendations for future research on sport-related grassroots movements.

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Thomas Curran and Andrew P. Hill

because self-conscious emotions are activated by threats to self-worth in the achievement and interpersonal contexts and are core affective features of anxiety and depression ( Kim, Thibodeau, & Jorgensen, 2011 ). Three self-conscious emotions are especially notable here, namely, pride, guilt, and shame

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Yonghwan Chang, Yong Jae Ko and Brad D. Carlson

pleasure–arousal theory ( Russell & Pratt, 1980 ) and the cognitive theory of pride ( Davidson, 1976 ), the three emotional profiles of pleasure, arousal, and pride are identified as explicit affective attitudes. We test the feasibility and predictive validity of the AEI in the context of athlete

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Jan Haut, Freya Gassmann, Eike Emrich, Tim Meyer and Christian Pierdzioch

game, in which elite-sports success triggers pride and happiness at home, but also raises suspicions concerning its legitimacy abroad. Thus, the achievement of different policy goals of elite-sports investments may be “more distinct than implied in much of the policy announcements and requires more