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John P. McGuire and Ray Murray

Print sport journalists are facing new demands in their jobs, including the need to work in front of the camera. This case study examined attitudes among sport reporters working with video at Oklahoma’s 2 largest daily newspapers. Qualitative in-depth interviews (N = 18) were used for data collection. The researchers identified 4 major themes: attitude, skills, training, and critiques. These sport journalists sought to maintain their print identities foremost despite recognizing the needs and expectations to adapt to a multimedia workforce. The researchers also concluded that the evolution toward multimedia journalism in these organizations remains a gradual process and that additional training and frequent professional critiques were needed as part of this evolution.

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Christoph G. Grimmer and Edward M. Kian

This article examines German print sport journalists’ perceptions, experiences, and relationships with Bundesliga clubs’ public relations (PR) staffers and each club’s designated press spokesperson, as well the impact of a competitive, multitier 21st-century media environment on their jobs. All Bundesliga clubs are now disseminating more multimedia content on their own through official Web sites and social media such as Twitter and Facebook. Meanwhile, the German newspaper industry is in a state of transformation and decreased prominence among mediums in German sport journalism. A survey of print journalists who cover Bundesliga clubs showed that these changes have affected the historic symbiotic relationship between the sporting press and Bundesliga clubs. Power and media autonomy have increased for Bundesliga clubs and their designated press spokespersons, while print reporters are more dependent on the clubs’ PR staffers to provide access. The surveyed journalists recognize the increasing power of television in German sport journalism, but nearly half do not consider this as negative for their jobs. These print sport journalists are called on to find new ways and types of media content to begin restoring the needed balance in a symbiotic relationship between independent press and PR, while also distinguishing their work from televised media content.

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Mark Lowes and Christopher Robillard

highlight some of the strengths of print sport journalists, as media consumers place greater credence and ascribe more journalistic independence to print journalists than those from other mediums. Due to the emergence of citizen journalism on Twitter, sport journalists have been forced to closely