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Reflections on Kinesiology: Persistent Issues and Contemporary Challenges

Karl M. Newell

In this paper I discuss briefly some traditional and contemporary issues that challenge the academic structure of the field of Kinesiology. These include the long-standing polemics of the profession-discipline debate and the fragmentation of the academic content knowledge, together with the more recent challenges of education or health as the umbrella construct and the relation of kinesiology to physical and occupational therapy. It appears that the essence of our persistent problems remains, but it is augmented with related and more contemporary issues. Thus, these continue to be challenging times in kinesiology, as they are for higher education in general, reinforcing the long-held notion that change is the one constant.

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A Question of the Head and the Heart: From Physical Education to Kinesiology in the Gymnasium and the Laboratory

Patricia Vertinsky

In this paper I view the history of kinesiology in America through the lens of a shifting academic landscape where physical culture and building acted upon each other to reflect emergent views concerning the nature of training in physical education and scientific developments around human movement. It is also an organizational history that has been largely lived in the gymnasium and the laboratory from its inception in the late nineteenth century to its current arrangements in the academy. Historians have referred to this in appropriately embodied terms as the head and the heart of physical education, and of course the impact of gender, class, and race was ever present. I conclude that the profession/discipline conundrum in kinesiology that has ebbed and flowed in the shifting spaces and carefully organized places of the academy has not gone away in the twenty-first century and that the complexities of today’s training require more fertile and flexible collaborative approaches in research, teaching, and professional training.

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Whither (or Wither) the Humanities in Kinesiology?

Jaime Schultz

perspectives. Humanistic Tendencies The scientific emphasis in kinesiology is nothing new, and there is no need to rehash its history (see Park, 1989, 1994 ; Schultz, 2018 ; Torres, 2014 ; Vertinsky, 2017 ; Wrynn, 2003 ). It is well-trod territory, typically associated with the profession-discipline and