Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 36 items for :

  • "professional learning" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Becky W. Pissanos and Pamela C. Allison

The purpose of this topical life history was to gain insight into the individual and socializing conditions that influenced an experienced elementary school physical education teacher’s perceptions and actions regarding continued professional learning. The teacher was interviewed in a series of five interviews over a 3-year period. The audiotaped transcriptions were subjected to the constant comparison data analysis technique, with the emergent patterns reported as results. Continued professional learning was valued as an essential concept associated with being a professional because it ultimately increased the teacher’s potential for helping students learn. Professional development experiences associated with the teacher’s undergraduate professional preparation institution and participation in a national curriculum project contributed most significantly to the teacher’s continued professional learning. The teacher’s continued professional learning was influenced by (a) students, (b) status, (c) administrative support, (d) community perceptions of sport, and (e) personal/professional interactions.

Full access

Tim Fletcher, Ken Lodewyk, Katie Glover and Sandra Albione

implementation, change efforts are seemingly doomed for failure or at the very least, disappointment ( Baird & Clark, 2018 ; Goodyear & Casey, 2015 ). Moments of curriculum change therefore offer critical periods to support teachers through targeted efforts to sustain their ongoing professional learning and

Restricted access

Kathleen M. Armour and Martin Yelling

This paper reports data from the third phase of a 2-year investigation into continuing professional development (CPD) for physical education teachers in England. The purpose of this phase was to examine the ways in which 10 case study teachers engaged in professional learning over the course of 1 academic year. Data were collected from a series of individual interviews with the teachers, learning diaries, field notes, and a final focus group interview. The findings suggest that these teachers identified CPD as “going on a course,” but, in reality, they learned in a variety of ways. The most striking finding was the high value they placed on learning informally (yet strategically) with and from each other. We argue, therefore, that the traditional relationship between teachers and CPD provision needs to be altered such that teachers in their professional learning communities or networks play a leading role.

Restricted access

Hayley Morrison and Doug Gleddie

see how PD for teachers’ and EAs’ together, who work as an instruction team, might support their experiences, professional learning communities, and mentorship for IPE. Inquiry into practitioners’ IPE-PD opportunities, past experiences with IPE and PD, and current challenges with IPE that PD could

Restricted access

John Williams and Shane Pill

cultures. The two main aims of this article are (a) to show how self-study can operate as an effective professional learning opportunity and (b) to demonstrate how a Game Sense Approach (GSA) can be used to teach the traditional Australian Aboriginal game, Buroinjin ( Australian Sports Commission [ASC

Restricted access

Becky W. Pissanos

The purpose of this inquiry was to gain insight into the influence of the three primary providers of continued professional education—educational institutions, professional associations, and employers—on teachers’ continued professional learning. Four experienced elementary school physical education teachers were selected as participants using the typical case purposeful sampling technique. Participants were asked to share their constructed perceptions regarding the providers through a series of three semistructured, open-ended interviews. Data were inductively analyzed using the constant comparative analytic strategy. The result indicated that the teachers did not perceive educational institutions, professional associations, or employers to be contributing significantly to their continued professional learning. They concluded that continued professional learning is more closely related to the teacher’s motivation and commitment levels and to the teaching realities of marginality, isolation, and monotony that influence those levels.

Restricted access

Ben P. Dyson, Rachel Colby and Mark Barratt

The purpose of this study was to investigate generalist classroom elementary teachers’ implementation of the Cooperative Learning (CL) pedagogical model into their physical education classes. The study used multiple sources of data drawing on qualitative data collection and data analysis research traditions (Miles, Huberman, & Saldana, 2014). Data were gathered from teacher post-lesson reflections, researcher journals, field notes, emails, and documents (such as lesson plans, school physical education programs, meeting transcripts), and on-going interviews with 12 teachers from four schools. The research team drew four categories from the data: Teachers’ lack of physical education preparation, Social skills needed for Cooperative Learning, Teachers’ understanding of Cooperative Learning, and Changing pedagogy to a student focus. An important feature in this study was the on-going, embedded support teachers received from a critical friend and their collaboration in the school’s CL Professional Learning Group. The findings suggest that with this type of support, generalist classroom teachers can learn to teach CL in their physical education classes. We found that teacher professional learning should be hands-on, take place in a social context, and be embedded in teachers’ own school context.

Open access

Rachael Bertram and Wade Gilbert

Continuing professional development (CPD) for sport coaches has been defined as all kinds of professional learning that occurs after initial certification (Nelson et al., 2006), and includes both non-formal and informal learning situations. Despite the fact that within the past decade there has been an increasing number of studies on these learning situations, learning communities as a type of CPD have received little attention. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to share initial observations and lessons learned from creating and implementing sport coach learning communities. In addition, this paper extends the dialogue on learning community implementation and assessment. Our learning community efforts were formulated around five key guidelines: (1) Stable settings dedicated to improving instruction and learning, (2) Job-alike teams, (3) Published protocols that guide but do not prescribe, (4) Trained peer facilitators, and (5) Working on student learning goals until there are tangible gains in student learning.

Restricted access

Kevin Patton, Melissa Parker and Erica Pratt

The purpose of this study was to examine the pedagogy of facilitation within physical education professional development (PD). Specific research questions were: 1) What were the self-identified pedagogical strategies employed by facilitators in PD?, and 2) From the perspective of the participants, what strategies contributed to their growth as learners? Participants included fifteen PD facilitators and 88 teachers from eight selected professional learning communities in the U.S. and Europe. Data sources included interviews, artifacts, and field notes. Three participant-centered pedagogical strategies reflected facilitators’ methods and teachers’ perceptions: (a) learning as doing: providing structure without dictating, (b) learning as trying: creating and testing new ideas, and (c) learning as sharing: public presentation of work. By teaching without telling, purposeful facilitator actions contributed to the development of an environment that encouraged teachers to become active participants in the creation of knowledge and development of professional capital.

Restricted access

K. Andrew R. Richards, Andrew D. Eberline and Thomas J. Templin

Secondary professional socialization is a phase of occupational socialization theory that focuses on graduate education in preparation for a career in academia. Due to the need to present and publish research and make professional contacts, professional organizations likely serve an important socializing function during graduate education. The purpose of this exploratory study was to understand graduate students’ perspectives of participating in professional organizations. Participants included 16 health and physical education graduate students who shared their experiences in focus group interviews. Data were analyzed using constant comparison and inductive analysis. Results indicate graduate students become involved in professional organizations primarily due to faculty encouragement. Participants highlighted networking as a benefit of involvement, and viewed professional learning and opportunities to present research as important to their career development. Results are discussed through the lens of occupational socialization theory, and limitations and implications for graduate student training are shared.