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Michelle Smith, Hayley McEwan, David Tod and Amanda Martindale

The research team explored UK trainee sport psychologists’ perspectives on developing professional judgment and decision-making (PJDM) expertise during their British Psychological Society (BPS) Qualification in Sport and Exercise Psychology (QSEP; Stage 2). An assorted analysis approach was adopted to combine an existing longitudinal qualitative data set with the collection and analysis of a new qualitative data set. Participants (female, n = 1; and male, n = 6) were interviewed 4 times over a 3-year training period, at minimum yearly intervals. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, and reflexive thematic analysis applied to transcripts using the theoretical concepts of PJDM. Experience, analytical reasoning, and observation of other practitioners’ practice was useful for developing PJDM expertise. PJDM expertise might be optimised through the use of knowledge elicitation principles. For example, supervisors could embed critical cues within the anecdotes they share to expand the experience base that trainees can draw from when making decisions.

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Gerald R. Ferris and Pamela L. Perrewé

The sport management field has witnessed tremendous growth just in the past couple of decades, with more programs in universities at the undergraduate, masters, and doctoral levels. Because there is keen competition for jobs at all levels, but particularly at the Ph.D. level in university faculty positions, and the lack of material published on how best to train, develop, and prepare doctoral students, this article focused on developing a combined apprenticeship and mentoring perspective on Ph.D. training, and discussed some of the specific features of that pedagogical approach. Hopefully, these ideas will help educators in sport management doctoral programs with their educational endeavors.

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Collin A. Webster, Diana Mindrila, Chanta Moore, Gregory Stewart, Karie Orendorff and Sally Taunton

), this study explored the role of educational background (primarily CSPAP professional training and CSPAP knowledge), perceived school support for a CSPAP, and demographic variables in physical education teachers’ DSI and CSPAP adoption behavior. Although no previous studies have specifically

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Peter W. Grandjean, Burritt W. Hess, Nicholas Schwedock, Jackson O. Griggs and Paul M. Gordon

Kinesiology programs are well positioned to create and develop partnerships within the university, with local health care providers, and with the community to integrate and enhance the activities of professional training, community service, public health outreach, and collaborative research. Partnerships with medical and health care organizations may be structured to fulfill accreditation standards and the objectives of the “Exercise is Medicine®” initiative to improve public health through primary prevention. Barriers of scale, location, time, human resources, and funding can be overcome so all stakeholder benefits are much greater than the costs.

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Hannah Butler-Coyne, Vaithehy Shanmuganathan-Felton and Jamie Taylor

Equestrian media is showing an increasing interest in the impact of mental health on performance and general wellbeing of equestrian athletes. This study explores the awareness of mental health difficulties and psychological wellbeing within equestrian sport from the perspectives of equestrian athletes, instructors/coaches and parents. The exploratory nature of the research offered opportunity to use a dual approach including e-surveys and semi-structured interviews. Analysis of the qualitative data identified five key themes (Emotional Wellbeing in Balance; Emotional Wellbeing Imbalance; Wellbeing Imbalance—Impact on Equestrian Sportspeople; Impact of Equestrian Sport on Wellbeing; Regaining Balance) and 22 sub-themes. The findings determine a compelling need for education, promotion of sharing experiences, facilitation of specialist (clinical and sport) professional training and intervention as well as a review of regulations from equestrian Governing Bodies.

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Alisa G. Anderson, Zöe Knowles and David Gilbourne

Current training models appear ill equipped to support sport psychology trainees in learning the requisite humanistic skills to provide athlete-centered services (Petitpas, Giges, & Danish, 1999). The aim of this paper is to build a case for the value of reflective practice as an approach to professional training and development that can assist practitioners in effectively managing themselves in practice. In developing the case for reflective practice, we discuss the nature of professional knowledge (Schön, 1987), define reflection, and present popular models of the reflective process from “educare” professions. In addition, we consider the application of reflective practice within sport psychology practice and highlight how reflective practice can benefit the professional and personal development of practitioners. Finally, discussion on appropriate outlets for the dissemination of reflective narratives is undertaken.

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Denis H. Stott, Sheila E. Henderson and Fred A. Moyes

This article describes the approach to testing that guided the recent revision of the Test of Motor Impairment (TOMI). Traditional attempts to measure intrinsic ability lent themselves to the labeling of children as defective. A test score should be regarded rather as a record of available capabilities. Performance depends on the abilities a child brings into play; the use of abilities and the development of skills depend in turn on motivational-emotional factors. Moreover, a composite score does not provide information about the reasons for failure. These considerations led to the compilation of qualitative diagnostic aids. The first directs the tester’s attention to the nature of a child’s failure of motor control, the second to behavioral sources of poor performance. The third checklist is a task-by-task, process-oriented analysis of motor faults designed for clinical diagnosis and professional training. In providing a detailed picture of a child’s performance, the TOMI bridges the gap between assessment and therapy and provides instrumentation for systematic, measurable therapy.

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Ellen J. Staurowsky and Jessica DiManno

As the American public is confronted with a more established female sport presence at all levels, the potential for girls to consider a career in sport media has expanded exponentially. Girls growing up in the age of ‘GRRL Power’ envision themselves as professional basketball players, world champion soccer stars, women who run like the wind, and as sports broadcasters. However, the dawn of a new age has also brought with it increasing complexity with regard to the issues aspiring young women seeking careers in sport media encounter. The overall purpose of this study was to extend the frame of our understanding about gender, sport, and the media by documenting the experiences, concerns, and attitudes of undergraduate females who hope to pursue careers as sports journalists, sports broadcasters, and sport media professionals. Based on interviews with ten undergraduate women, the next generation of women in sport media are more than prepared to take on with confidence, assertiveness, and a great deal of solid professional training the challenges that await them. However, even as undergraduates, these women have had to deal with, and make sense, of sexual objectification and sexism in the workplace. The article concludes with recommendations for how to support young women in their quest to pursue careers in sport media.

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Frank C. Mendel, Michael G. Dolan, Dale R. Fish, John Marzo and Gregory E. Wilding

Context:

High-voltage pulsed current (HVPC), a form of electrical stimulation, is known to curb edema formation in laboratory animals and is commonly applied for ankle sprains, but the clinical effects remain undocumented.

Objective:

To determine whether, as an adjunct to routine acute and subacute care, subsensory HVPC applied nearly continuously for the first 72 h after lateral ankle sprains affected time lost to injury.

Design:

Multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

Setting:

Data were collected at 9 colleges and universities and 1 professional training site.

Participants:

50 intercollegiate and professional athletes.

Interventions:

Near-continuous live or placebo HVPC for 72 h postinjury in addition to routine acute and subacute care.

Main Outcome Measure:

Time lost to injury measured from time of injury until declared fit to play.

Results:

Overall, time lost to injury was not different between treated and control groups (P = .55). However, grade of injury was a significant factor. Time lost to injury after grade I lateral ankle sprains was greater for athletes receiving live HVPC than for those receiving placebo HVPC (P = .049), but no differences were found between groups for grade II sprains (P = .079).

Conclusions:

Application of subsensory HVPC had no clinically meaningful effect on return to play after lateral ankle sprain.

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Jill Tracey

Context:

Health professionals (ie, physical therapists, athletic trainers) can play an integral role in the psychological recovery from injury.

Objective:

To examine health professionals’ perceptions of the roles they play and their influence on the psychological recovery of their clients.

Design:

A qualitative design using semistructured interviews that were transcribed and analyzed using interpretational analyses to reveal themes.

Setting:

4 rehabilitation clinics specializing in sport- and physical-activity-related injuries.

Participants:

18 participants (17 physical therapists, 1 athletic trainer) with a mean age of 36 years.

Results:

Using thematic coding of the interview data, general-dimension data themes identified were centered on the roles of rapport builder, educator, and communicator. Health professionals perceive that they play important roles in the psychological recovery of their clients in spite of a lack of professional training in psychology and strive to create a caring and supportive environment. Results demonstrate the perceptions of the roles they play and the influence they have on the psychological component of the recovery process.