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Gretchen A. Schlabach

The profession of athletic training has not identified and explicitly articulated shared professional values (PV). Shared PV are the seeds of professionalism, and deeply rooted motivators of professional action which support the social contract through self-regulation. The purpose of this exploratory study was to: (1) discover shared PV in athletic training, (2) examine how important PV are to the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) membership, and (3) how important is it for our association to explicitly articulate professional values. This study found that truth/honesty, integrity, and respect are significant athletic training PV. PV are important (96.8%), and it is important for the association to explicitly articulate PV (96.5%). The declaration of shared PV will promote values-based behaviors and internally motivate a duty to uphold the legal, ethical, and regulatory standards of the profession. Dedication to our professional responsibilities will sustain the social contract and encourage public trust.

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Xin Zhong, Shuhua Zhou and Guosong Shao

This article moves away from content-oriented studies on Olympics coverage by focusing on the producers of Olympic images. The study first explicates the concept of professionalism and the objectives of Olympics coverage. A survey questionnaire was designed accordingly to measure a sample of the Chinese professionals who were part of the production team of the international TV signal for the Beijing Olympics. Results indicated that the production professionals were well prepared and were in line with Olympic ideals. Less clear-cut were the concepts of motion and emotion in Olympic coverage. Implications are discussed.

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Column-editor : Neil Curtis

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Jill Manners and James Scifers

Column-editor : James M. Mensch

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M. Ann Hall

upon boxing, billiards, trotting, pedestrian races, and other public exhibitions of physical training or endurance.” 34 Any member discovered to have engaged in professionalism, which normally meant having accepted a cash prize, was expelled. Professionalism, when confined strictly within its own

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Christopher M. McLeod and Calvin Nite

formed alliances and political coalitions, they were forced to accept professionalism, which had become a normative and coercive logic. Professionalism changed how actors cooperated because economic capital replaced cultural and social capital as the key resource in rugby ( O’Brien & Slack, 2003

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Joseph Murphy

Column-editor : James M. Mensch