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Michael W. Metzler and Bonnie L. Tjeerdsma

This paper describes a development, research, and improvement (DRI) framework for conducting comprehensive program assessment in physical education teacher education (PETE) programs. The DRI model has three main stages: development, research, and decision-making for improvement. Each stage is comprised of a series of questions that allow a PETE faculty to proceed through program assessment to arrive at a “custom made” plan. The framework functions mainly on the collection of valid and reliable data gathered by using existing systematic observation instruments, qualitative techniques, and psychometric instruments from the current sport pedagogy literature. The resulting data are then used to monitor students’ acquisition of the program’s intended pedagogical skills, content knowledge, performance knowledge, beliefs-attitudes, and professional dispositions. Having become a “learning organization,” the PETE faculty is then able to make more systematic decisions about improving selected program components.

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Bryan McCullick, Mike Metzler, Seref Cicek, Josephine Jackson and Brad Vickers

An ever-increasing focus on accountability in teacher education has augmented the importance of physical education teacher education (PETE) programs to develop procedures for assessing their candidates and completers—the student teachers (STs). Finding out what students think, know, and feel about STs’ teaching ability is yet another valuable source of data that can assist in the assessment process. The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to examine students’ perspectives of STs’ effectiveness as a window into the effectiveness of a PETE program, and (b) to identify students’ ability to provide valuable feedback to PETE programs on how well STs meet the NASPE National Standards for Beginning Physical Education Teachers (NSBPET). Using the NASPE/NCATE standards as a framework, a set of interview questions was developed to elicit students’ perspectives of the STs’ performance. Findings were inductively analyzed and indicated that STs were able to meet some of the NASPE/NCATE standards and that students can be valuable data sources regarding STs’ competence in Content Knowledge, Diverse Learners, Communication, Management and Motivation, Planning and Instruction, Student Assessment, and Reflection. Students were less able to provide insight into STs’ performance in Growth and Development, Technology, and Collaboration. Overall, these findings suggest that students can be counted on as a source of evidence to complement a thorough and fruitful program assessment.

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Malissa Martin and Darla Vale

Column-editor : Malissa Martin

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Michael W. Metzler and Bonnie L. Tjeerdsma

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Michael W. Metzler and Bonnie L. Tjeerdsma

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Ashley Walker, Jody L. Langdon, Gavin Colquitt and Starla McCollum

There is limited research that includes democratic practices to evaluate the PETE program in its ability to prepare preservice teachers (PTs). In other areas such as community health, methodologies have been used to provide a voice to individuals living the experience. The purpose of this study was to examine PTs’ perceptions of a teacher education program during the student teaching experience using Photovoice. A group of PTs (N = 16) from a university in southeast Georgia were given 14 days to capture the strengths and weakness of their teacher preparation program through photography. The PTs then discussed their photographs during two focus groups with the researcher. The focus groups were audio recorded and transcribed. Data analysis included an evaluation of interview transcripts and photographs using content analysis to identify significant themes that emerged. An action plan to promote curricular change was created by the PTs and presented to PETE faculty.

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Christian J. Thompson and Wayne H. Osness

Substantial research has indicated the beneficial effect of physical activity on physical fitness and activities of daily living in older adults, but none have investigated the effects on performance of recreational activities. This investigation studied the effect of an exercise program on fitness and golf-clubhead speed in older men. Thirty-one golfers (mean age 65.1 ± 6.2 years) were randomly assigned to a treatment (n = 19) or control (n = 12) group. The treatment group completed an 8-week strength and flexibility program. Assessments included 10-RM muscle strength; selected range-of-motion (ROM) measurements; and golf-clubhead speed (CHS). ANCOVA revealed significant differences between groups (p < .005) for all strength measurements and several ROM measurements. CHS was significantly different (p < .05) between groups after the intervention. Mean CHS improved from 85.0 to 87.1 miles/hr (136.8 to 140.2 km/hr). These results indicate that a strength and flexibility program can improve golf performance in older adults.

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Carrie W. LeCrom, Brendan Dwyer and Gregory Greenhalgh

The scholars of sport for development (SFD) suggest the need for advancements in theory development and stronger connections between practice and theory. This article outlines some of the challenges and barriers to theory development in SFD and suggests ways to move forward. The authors state that theories and frameworks in SFD are underdeveloped as a result of methodological and contextual challenges due to the variance in SFD programming. The SFD programs are being implemented across the globe in a myriad of countries and contexts, addressing varying social issues that make theory development challenging. Suggestions are put forward to help scholars and practitioners overcome these challenges, including creativity in methodology, collaborations in program assessment, and the need for patience required of fields focusing on social and behavioral change.

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Catrine Tudor-Locke and Catherine B. Chan

Background:

We examined participant characteristics related to pedometer program adherence and completion.

Methods:

Participants (n = 177, age = 43 ± 9 y, BMI = 29.5 ± 6.2 kg/m2) were from sedentary workplaces. Baseline steps/day for women (n = 153) was 7230 ± 3447 versus men (n = 24) 8265 ± 2849 (P < 0.05). Records included pedometer use, days/week goals were achieved, and steps/day. Program completers (n = 104) fulfilled pre- and post-program assessments and at least 8 wk of recording. Non-completers (n = 53) met neither requirement, but pre-program data were available.

Results:

There were no significant differences in sex, age, education, or time at work between completion strata. The only significant baseline difference was an initial “worry about completing the program” (completer < non-completer; P < 0.05). The pedometer-based program was most successful in increasing physical activity in overweight or class I obese individuals. Participants with lower baseline steps/day were also more likely to complete the program.

Conclusion:

The study findings have potential to inform effective health promotion planning.