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Richard J. Boergers, Thomas G. Bowman, Nicole Sgherza, Marguerite Montjoy, Melanie Lu and Christopher W. O’Brien

sport activity, the second leading cause in patients younger than 30 years of age. 7 It is critical for ATs to not only be familiar with protective equipment, but also with how to remove it to gain emergency access to patients. The goal of prehospital clinical care is to stabilize patients and prepare

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Jenna Ratka, Jamie Mansell and Anne Russ

efficacy of preventative strategies. Protective equipment affords the greatest potential for mitigation of injury in full-contact collision sports (e.g., American football, ice hockey). 1 , 4 In some of these sports, helmets and mouthguards are mandated as a strategy to reduce head injuries 5 , 6

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reviewed? a. Australia, Denmark, and Norway b. Australia, Denmark, and Sweden c. Australia, Norway, and Sweden d. Denmark, Norway, and New Zealand 3. Of the seven studies reviewed, how many were cohort studies? a. 4 b. 5 c. 6 d. 7 4. As mentioned by Ratka et al, in rugby, the use of protective equipment

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Hideyuki E Izumi and Masaaki Tsuruike

the appropriate course of action (e.g., treatment, return to play). 3. Assessment Identify safety hazards associated with physical activities, facilities, and protective equipment by following accepted procedures and guidelines to make appropriate recommendations and to minimize the risk of injury and

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Cynthia J. Wright, Nico G. Silva, Erik E. Swartz and Brent L. Arnold

possible airway obstruction, amongst other pathologies. 1 , 2 In the event of injury, protective equipment (e.g., helmet, shoulder pads) can pose a barrier to effective emergency care. 3 – 5 Thus, due to the risks of the sport and potential for equipment to inhibit care, athletic trainers responsible for

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Mitchell Naughton, Joanna Miller and Gary J. Slater

. Given this finding and the current lack of evidence for the utility of these strategies, more research is necessary to establish whether anti-inflammatory strategies improve recovery following IIMD. Preventive Interventions The use of preventive interventions like protective equipment has been evaluated

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John Strickland and Grant Bevill

review of biomechanics literature demonstrates that only the protective equipment available to batters and catchers have been evaluated, 5 – 9 whereas, to the authors’ knowledge, no tests have been performed for the facemasks available for fielders. Data from studies examining catcher’s masks are

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Rebecca M. Hirschhorn, Cassidy Holland, Amy F. Hand and James M. Mensch

risk of injury and illness of the athletic population through awareness, education, and intervention. 4.38 ± 0.85 3 Minimize the risk of injury and illness through proper utilization of preparticipation physicals and other screening tools. 3.97 ± 1.22 4 Properly fit personal protective equipment and

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Zachary Y. Kerr, Andrew E. Lincoln, Shane V. Caswell, David A. Klossner, Nina Walker and Thomas P. Dompier

. As a result, efforts to reduce the incidence of concussion in women’s lacrosse have focused on coaching techniques, officiating, education, rule changes, and protective equipment to address all potential mechanisms of injury. 13 Though unconfirmed, initiatives for better rules enforcement and

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Emanuele D’Artibale, Maheswaran Rohan and John B. Cronin

service during circuit and open-road competitions. 4 , 16 – 21 Periodical changes in technical regulations, 3 , 22 evolution of protective equipment, 23 – 25 and improvements in circuit safety standards (ie, gravel traps, tarmac run-offs, air-fences, etc) have aimed at increasing the safety of this